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  1. #11
    Enthusiast
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    Sep 2007
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    VA
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    Re: Sediment In Old Whiskey

    Resurrecting an older thread....I was inspecting some of my older bottles sitting in my basement and noticed some small "clouds" in the bottom of a Rathskellar Rye and some in an old Michter's bottle. I don't intend on opening either any time soon, but wanted to figure out what may have caused this.
    Bourbon is sunshine held together by water....

  2. #12
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    Jul 2012
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    Honolulu, HI
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    Re: Sediment In Old Whiskey

    As a former student, I can say that a state of equilibrium in solutions can often require long periods of time to achieve, even decades. When the barrels are dumped and diluted, the juice simply isn't given sufficient time before bottling. So, precipitates often form in the bottle. This is general chemistry. [I once conducted an experiment that failed to achieve the proper results until the final solution sat for 3 months (which was 1 month beyond the semester's end).]

    As well, the equilibrium point may change with changes in temperature, and precipitates can form more easily than returning to solution.
    Last edited by MauiSon; 04-25-2013 at 13:11.

  3. #13
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    May 2012
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    Charleston, WV
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    324

    Re: Sediment In Old Whiskey

    While touring Buffalo Trace, and specifically the the Blanton's bottling line ... they pick up a QC sample bottle, then swirl (agitate) it ... then put it over a contrast light. The suspended solids disperse the light and clearly show the turbidity. Its my understanding that these suspended solids (fats/proteins) are present in all unfiltered bourbons and play a role in the flavor profile ... hence, the bartender's double pour to provide "mixing".
    Sto lat!!!

    bllygthrd

  4. #14
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    Apr 2011
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    Toledo, OH
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    802

    Re: Sediment In Old Whiskey

    Quote Originally Posted by bllygthrd View Post
    While touring Buffalo Trace, and specifically the the Blanton's bottling line ... they pick up a QC sample bottle, then swirl (agitate) it ... then put it over a contrast light. The suspended solids disperse the light and clearly show the turbidity. Its my understanding that these suspended solids (fats/proteins) are present in all unfiltered bourbons and play a role in the flavor profile ... hence, the bartender's double pour to provide "mixing".
    Sounds like Freddie gave us both the same demonstration.
    Deer turn into elk during the rut. (And you'd better stand back.)
    Yes, stars are just pinholes in the curtain of night.
    Rosey fingered Dawn, the child of Morning, drives them all away.
    If God made anything better than bourbon he must have kept it for Hisself.

  5. #15
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    Jan 2013
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    Dallas, TX
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    376

    Re: Sediment In Old Whiskey

    Over time precipitate can form in bottles of lower proof, non-chill filtered whiskey. This is actually an occurrence we have in bottles of Baby Blue and Rumble over time. There's nothing wrong with the whiskey, just a sign of rich oils and esters present in it.

 

 

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