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  1. #31
    Connoisseur
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Manheim, PA 17545
    Posts
    762

    Re: Who's tried Dad's Hat? What did you think?

    Was down at the distillery yesterday with Dave Ziegler. I told Herman about the conversation on here, so hopefully he stops by and reads it.

    As for duplication of Monongahela ryes- You have to keep in mind there are many styles and Herman has taken years to come up with his whiskey's profile and distillation process. I still rank it as one of the best craft whiskeys on the market. And look out for Dad's Hat that's aged in traditional 53 gallon barrels- They've been aging whiskey in that size now for about a year and a half and once the 2 year mark is reached, they will begin the sampling process to determine when they will be ready to dump.
    If you have anything Michter's or Pennco and would like to sell it or share it with me, please let me know.

  2. #32
    Guru
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Jackson, MS
    Posts
    11,736

    Re: Who's tried Dad's Hat? What did you think?

    I wish he would read our posts Ethan, and add some comments of his own. Speaking for myself, and I believe most of the others here, we appreciate a hands on maker joining in the conversation.
    We're Bourbon Geeks, it's who we are, it's what we do.

  3. #33
    Connoisseur
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Manheim, PA 17545
    Posts
    762

    Re: Who's tried Dad's Hat? What did you think?

    Yep. That's why I mentioned this site to him. He's been quite busy recently down there, so I don't know if/when he will have some time to read it.
    If you have anything Michter's or Pennco and would like to sell it or share it with me, please let me know.

  4. #34
    Guru
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Jackson, MS
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    11,736

    Re: Who's tried Dad's Hat? What did you think?

    Well he's welcome anytime.
    We're Bourbon Geeks, it's who we are, it's what we do.

  5. #35
    Advanced Taster
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Lakewood, CO
    Posts
    141

    Re: Who's tried Dad's Hat? What did you think?

    I am Very curious about this Dad's Hat Pennsylvania Rye.
    It is allegedly one of few old school Pennsylvania ryes from a time when there were many more 'distinct' regional styles.
    I believe it is termed Monongahela Rye. Which is allegedly 90+% Rye in the Mashbill.
    Could be completely wrong about all this.
    Seems very tempting.
    But I have only had RR BIB so far which I enjoy. and it retails here for $46 - $50 ish before tax.

    One review I read said that they will certainly make amazing rye once the age comes up a bit. I generally take all reviews exceedingly lightly myself.

  6. #36
    Guru
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    Sep 2004
    Location
    Jackson, MS
    Posts
    11,736

    Re: Who's tried Dad's Hat? What did you think?

    I believe the traditional mashbill as developed by the late 1800s contained close to 60% rye. Early Colonists used the grains at hand of course but as the industry grew grains were chosen for specific properties and the truth is rye whisky, while quite flavorful, can be a bit thin if there isn't some corn in the mash to beef up the texture.
    We're Bourbon Geeks, it's who we are, it's what we do.

  7. #37
    Advanced Taster
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Lakewood, CO
    Posts
    141

    Re: Who's tried Dad's Hat? What did you think?

    Squire, here's one place I read about the 90%+ Rye. not certain of its sources or reliability though.

    http://drinks.seriouseats.com/2012/1...de-brands.html

    "Originally, Pennsylvania-style rye, also known as Monongahela-style, was a full-on rye bomb of a whiskey, 100% rye. It was a blend of malted and unmalted rye, with no corn or barley. The malted rye served the same role that malting provides in making Scotch; malting prodded along the fermentation process by providing the enzymes that open up the grain kernels and convert starches to sugars.
    By the end of the 19th century, though, Pennsylvania distillers moved from malted rye to malted barley in their mash bills. Anywhere from 80–95% was unmalted rye, with malted barley as the remainder. Still no corn."

  8. #38
    Advanced Taster
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Lakewood, CO
    Posts
    141

    Re: Who's tried Dad's Hat? What did you think?

    Even if that 90%+ bill is phony, it sounds incredibly tempting. I would love to try a 100% rye whiskey aged to at least 4 years in new charred white oak.

  9. #39
    Advanced Taster
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Lakewood, CO
    Posts
    141

    Re: Who's tried Dad's Hat? What did you think?

    that article goes on to say about the Dad's Hat Mash bill:

    "Dad's Hat has a mash bill of 80% rye, 15% malted barley, and 5% malted rye. It's aged in small barrels (so-called quarter casks) for six months. The company is also reportedly working on a straight rye that will be aged in standard barrels for at least two years."

  10. #40
    Guru
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    Sep 2004
    Location
    Jackson, MS
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    11,736

    Re: Who's tried Dad's Hat? What did you think?

    As an historical reference I think Washington's mash bill (developed by his Scottish born distiller) is typical of the times. There are some early books on distilling (Samuel McHarry pub. 1809, M.L. Byrn pub. 1830) yet before we get into what might be called 'historically accurate' formulas we should be mindful that for the first two hundred years from Colonial times forward whisky wasn't aged prior to sale. Aging whisky in charred barrels was developed as a common practice along with the development of the column still in the 1830-1840s. Current Master Distillers have stated in recent interviews that the barrel contributes between 60 -80% of the flavor in whisky with the balance made up by the mash bill and yeast. An even more striking difference in flavor is determined by warehouse location.

    I understand the marketing aspects of a distiller claiming to return to a whisky formula as it was made in olden times but that presupposes there was some standard (100% malted rye for example, or 80/20 rye and barley) when in fact there was no such standard. Successful distillers were a practical bunch who developed their own mash bills, yeast culture and production techniques and used what worked most profitably.

    Fanciful stories might sell the first bottle but only by making a good product will you sell the second.
    We're Bourbon Geeks, it's who we are, it's what we do.

 

 

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