Welcome to the Straightbourbon.com Forums.
Page 5 of 5 FirstFirst ... 345
Results 41 to 49 of 49
  1. #41
    Advanced Taster
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Northeast Ohio
    Posts
    233

    Re: Handling Increased Demand

    Quote Originally Posted by Cjen View Post
    Also, I did some posting/research here a while back on new distilleries in KY. While doing that, I also saw a (relatively) new distillery in SC that focused on using technology to "refine" spirits. One of the benefits was said to be rapid 'aging' of bourbon. I remember looking them up briefly and hearing good things, but you never know what to believe without sampling for yourself! Company was called Terrassentia.
    Cjen, I recommend reading the threads regarding Cleveland Whiskey who is also using a process to quickly "age" bourbon and have already released their first batch to the market.

  2. #42
    Guru
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Jackson, MS
    Posts
    12,457

    Re: Handling Increased Demand

    Methods to artificially age or speed aging of whisky have been published for over two centuries now and the only thing that has been proven is none of them work.

  3. #43

    Re: Handling Increased Demand

    Quote Originally Posted by cowdery View Post
    All 50 states have a 3-tier system, i.e., a layer between the producer and the retailer.
    Not necessarily. All states have tiers, but not necessarily 3. For example, control states could be said to really only have 2, as the producer sends product to the state liquor store, where people can buy it. And I think some states allow direct shipments now as well--but I'm not sure, as I have never lived in any state that (potentially) does. But you also have many states with "tasting room" laws, which allow a producer to sample and sell direct to the consumer at their facility. But I agree that these are exceptions, not the rule.

    But you are correct cowdery: the point is that the market will figure itself out in terms of pricing. And since spirit producers can't add an "msrp" or print a price right on the bottle like other industries (think potato chips), we will see the highest price consumers will bear (for mass market brands).

    Competition drives price down, but supply shortages force it up--hence my comment that, during this bourbon shortage, I bet many end consumers will explore alternative brands..

  4. #44
    Trippah and Admin
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Northeast Ahia
    Posts
    4,767

    Re: Handling Increased Demand

    Ohio is as controlled as it gets and there are 3 tiers here.

    The producers may ship liquor to the state warehouse, but the transaction is brokered by a distributor.
    My name is Joel Goodson. I deal in human fulfillment.
    I grossed over eight thousand dollars in one night. Time of your life, huh kid?

  5. #45

    Re: Handling Increased Demand

    Quote Originally Posted by squire View Post
    Methods to artificially age or speed aging of whisky have been published for over two centuries now and the only thing that has been proven is none of them work.
    True. But distillation has been going on for millennia and hasn't really changed much. Yes, I realize that there are hundreds of significant variables involved and everything from still shape and size to vapor pressures and running length to mash bills and barrel char make a difference in the final product, but the core concept is the same now as it was back in the day. After 2,000+ years of distilling and aging, I'd say someone ought to figure out how to do it more efficiently. Not necessarily better, but more efficiently. That way the mass market brands can stabilize their supply and the micros can garner more interest and get more creative without having to worry about achieving a certain scale to survive.

    I'd personally love to see more places like Corsair, where almost everything they make is "experimental." The downside to these types of micros is that they often can't afford to play around and have a great everyday bourbon (at least not in reasonable supply/circulation). But I know Corsair uses small barrels to "age" faster (which apparently works pretty well?), but "faster" still means a couple years. They can't keep up with demand as is, and I'd hate to see them slow their experimentation in favor of lots of traditional product because I think the industry needs more of the experimental stuff. So you have to take the lesser of two evils in cases like this, balancing innovation for extra supply of a more traditional product.


    In any case, I'm open to new ideas in this industry and will try anything once. Be it now or a hundred years from now, someone will probably look back on some of the things we do with bourbon today and compare it to the clay pot "stills" used in the earliest years of distillation. Will they still be honoring traditional distillation methods and barrel aging as they look back and reminiscence? Absolutely. That will never drop away--we won't let it! But will the bourbon most people drink everyday be produced the same way as today? Probably not. No clue how it will be made, but you've got to believe that in today's world of "disruption" and bourbon both being trendy, something going to happen sooner or later.

  6. #46
    Guru
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Jackson, MS
    Posts
    12,457

    Re: Handling Increased Demand

    Actually, I don't "got to believe" anything.

  7. #47

    Re: Handling Increased Demand

    Quote Originally Posted by squire View Post
    Actually, I don't "got to believe" anything.
    Just a playful expression.

    I'm not making a case or asking you to do anything. I'm just intrigued.

  8. #48
    Bourbonian of the Year 2002 and Guru
    Join Date
    Sep 1999
    Location
    Chicago
    Posts
    12,637

    Re: Handling Increased Demand

    Historically in Ohio, the state was both distributor and retailer, and actually performed both functions, though separately (so two, not one). Now the retailers are private owners who act as agents for the state; and even though the state is still technically the distributor, the actual work is done by a private, commercial distribution company. Since the state occupies two of the three tiers, you could argue that it's a two-tier system, but functionally it is a three-tier system, in that producers do not ship directly to retailers.

    The producers wish they could sell direct to major chains, both on- and off-premise. They do in a way, in that they can do everything except actually write the order. The order must go through a distributor.

    The system has broken down in the sense that prohibitions against the same person having ownership interest in more than one tier are easily gotten around, and the local companies distributors were supposed to be are now legal fictions, since most distribution is done by national or large regional companies. The idea was that a producer could be remote and hard to touch legally, but a distributor would be local and thus more readily brought before the law. It's still true in the sense that distributors are required to have in market assets. Therefore, a distributor who has business in both Ohio and Indiana can't supply Ohio entirely from its Indiana warehouse. At least, I don't think they've gotten around that one yet.

    Like a lot of Prohibition vestiges, the problems these systems were meant to solve don't seem like problems anymore, but the system doesn't change because there are people who have a powerful financial interest in keeping things the same.

  9. #49
    Trippah and Admin
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Northeast Ahia
    Posts
    4,767

    Re: Handling Increased Demand

    If you consider the state to be a distributor due to the regional warehouses, then Ohio has a 4th tier as the state buys through traditional distributors like Glazers and Southern Wine and Spirits.

    Also, Ohio DLC is the only liquor retailer as the local shop does not own the booze on their shelves. It belongs to the DLC until it is sold on a consignment basis by a retail permit holder. This is only true for liquor over 21% ABV and not other alcoholic beverages.

    Regardless, there are quite a few profit minded folks who touch the liquor between the distillery and the consumer.
    My name is Joel Goodson. I deal in human fulfillment.
    I grossed over eight thousand dollars in one night. Time of your life, huh kid?

 

 

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 49
    Last Post: 05-20-2014, 21:32
  2. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 06-16-2012, 05:12
  3. Can Proof In Bottled Bourbon Be Increased?
    By Gillman in forum General Bourbon Discussion
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: 03-28-2006, 23:50

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Back to top