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  1. #11
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    Re: These are the Good Old Days

    Quote Originally Posted by squire View Post
    The internet, or, more precisely, the immediate availability of accurate information that makes us an informed consumer. A 22 year old grad student can go on Straightbourbon.com and over a weekend learn more about Bourbon than the liquor store owner who has been in business for 40 years.

    25 years ago an informed consumer was one that had learned to sort out brands by trial and error. Today the informed consumer is aware of the differences in mash bills, yeasts, barrel char, how location in the warehouse affects aging, and who (for the most part) actually made the whisky in the bottle. We are not impressed by claims of special water, only the choicest grains, of being hand made using a secret family recipe that no one else can duplicate or that old canard about being pot stilled when we know it damn well ain't.

    What we now have are marvelous whiskys because producers are willing to make them available with a label specifically identifying the whiskys used in the vatting, their mashbill, yeast,when, where and for how long they were aged in specific warehouses even down to rack and barrel numbers. These are the days of Bourbon made for connoisseurs who can appreciate them and are willing to pay for true premium goods.
    Couldn't have said it better myself Squire . And prior to, or even during the glut, the limited premium bourbons availabe, when inflation adjusted weren't cheap either. Eagle Rare 10 year 101, introduced in 1975, was at that time the equivalent of $40 a bottle today.
    Thad

    BTOTY-2011

  2. #12
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    Re: These are the Good Old Days

    I think the golden age is coming in the next ten years or so. The craze is on and they're putting some revolutionary stuff in barrels. There have been some BTEC that, if they could duplicate it and make it regularly available, would be a totally different product from anything on shelves today. I'm excited for what today's demand will mean in ten or fifteen years.

  3. #13
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    Re: These are the Good Old Days

    Quote Originally Posted by Trey Manthey View Post
    For example? True, you can't buy WT12 year anymore, but I've got a 14 year old WT sitting on the shelf down the street.
    And the last bottle of WTRB I bought was so young I had to pour it out.
    MM 6 summers in the wood, that's damn near white dog for a wheater.
    ovh

  4. #14
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    Re: These are the Good Old Days

    Well, my golden age is now, think I'll have another tot of Grand Dad.

  5. #15
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    Re: These are the Good Old Days

    Quote Originally Posted by ATXWhiskey View Post
    I think the golden age is coming in the next ten years or so. The craze is on and they're putting some revolutionary stuff in barrels. There have been some BTEC that, if they could duplicate it and make it regularly available, would be a totally different product from anything on shelves today. I'm excited for what today's demand will mean in ten or fifteen years.
    True, also they are just putting a heck of a lot of barrels on the ricks.
    There are more barrels of bourbon being aged right now than there are citizens of KY.
    Everyone has been ramping up production for a few years now and hopefully they are aging to much, this would mean they'll leave it in the wood longer and we'll get some good mature bourbon.
    I'd love to see another glut, maybe in ten years like you said.
    ovh

  6. #16
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    Re: These are the Good Old Days

    Quote Originally Posted by OscarV View Post
    And the last bottle of WTRB I bought was so young I had to pour it out.
    MM 6 summers in the wood, that's damn near white dog for a wheater.
    You can't complain about age statements dropping, and then bring up two NAS whiskeys as your proof.

    However, Maker's Mark is an interesting lynchpin in this discussion. On one hand, they have changed almost nothing about their production since the brand launched. However, the current whiskey renaissance drove even them to experiment with, and release, Maker's 46.

    According to sku, the Golden Age is OVER!

  7. #17
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    Re: These are the Good Old Days

    Quote Originally Posted by Trey Manthey View Post
    You can't complain about age statements dropping, and then bring up two NAS whiskeys as your proof.
    I'm not trying to sway a jury, fact is age staements are disapearing.
    And to my tastes the bourbons are to young, not saying at all what they taste like to anyone else.
    ovh

  8. #18
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    Re: These are the Good Old Days

    I think what you see right now is a surge in demand for older whiskies that is outpacing supply (and since you can't very well make a 12 year bourbon in less than 12 years, the spike in demand creates quite a problem for the producers). They could very well just start to ratchet up the price to curb demand to meet their supplies, but that very well might turn off too many consumers. Or, they could cut proofs with water to keep the age statements . . . or, they could "dilute" with some younger whiskey. Both changes the character some, but I think using younger juice has less of an impact.

    If push came to shove, would you rather have ORVW 10 yr/107 drop the age statement and stay at 107 proof (maybe having to put some small percentage of 6 or 8 yr juice to keep the flavor profile) - or keep the age statement but drop the proof to 90?

    As to the original question, I think squire nailed it
    Gary
    =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
    "Too much of anything is bad, but too much of good whiskey is barely enough." - Mark Twain
    "Because Whiskey Matters!" - David Perkins

  9. #19
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    Re: These are the Good Old Days

    Quote Originally Posted by darylld911 View Post
    (and since you can't very well make a 12 year bourbon in less than 12 years, the spike in demand creates quite a problem for the producers)
    Cleveland Whiskey can. :P

  10. #20
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    Re: These are the Good Old Days

    Quote Originally Posted by squire View Post
    Oscar I don't see where the distillerys are running out of good aged Bourbon. If you have solid inside information to the contrary I would like to hear it.
    Quote Originally Posted by OscarV View Post
    I'm just going by what's on the shelfs of retail outlets and the taste of current bourbons.
    Age statements are disapearing and the bourbons are tasting younger.
    Oscar you're spot on...you have your head in the sand if you don't see this...OWA, WSR, EC18, WTRR, WTR101, BH, ETL, RHF, BMH, NM, V21, V23, etc all getting younger or disappearing all together is a direct result of not enough aged bourbon/whiskey to continue the label. I've seen enough through my interactions to drive me to bunker for a reason!
    You can find me in chat most nights on days ending with the letter y!

 

 

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