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  1. #31
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    Re: An Instructive Story

    Quote Originally Posted by squire View Post
    Gary, blind tasting was the principle reason I stopped buying expensive whiskys.
    After that discovery, I pledged not to buy anything expensive unless I had tried it first. Before ECBP, I hadn't found anything that I enjoyed as much as a GTS or WLW (including PVW20). Of course, after making said pledge, I went to the KBF and bought a 25 yr rye that I hope (but don't expect) will improve with some air. I literally charted out my purchases of bottles over $50 which I had NOT tried before, and found that of the 8 I could recall - I was only really happy with 1 of them (THH). The rest I thought I would enjoy as much as items at half the price in most cases.

    Of course, I'm REALLY hoping the 2012 FRSmBLE becomes my second, as I hadn't tried it yet
    Gary
    =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
    "Too much of anything is bad, but too much of good whiskey is barely enough." - Mark Twain
    "Because Whiskey Matters!" - David Perkins

  2. #32
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    Re: An Instructive Story

    Quote Originally Posted by Flyfish View Post
    Squire makes me feel stupid for repeatedly violating my Nothing Over $30 vow. A blind tasting often reveals that I sometimes prefer the expensive bourbon about 10% more than my regular pours.
    If knowing that your bourbon costs a lot (or that you respect the distiller who made it, or like the history behind it, or whatever) makes the bourbon seem better to you, why not pay that premium? I seem to be disagreeing with most posts in the thread, but I like to do whatever I can to get the maximum entertainment out of my bourbon, and if that means paying a bit more for a bottle that's critically acclaimed, then so be it.

    I feel like not buying pricier bottles just because you sometimes can't tell the difference in blind tastings is taking a stance on principle that does not make too much sense to me. How often are you really drinking your whiskey blind?

  3. #33
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    Re: An Instructive Story

    Quote Originally Posted by Danger View Post
    I feel like not buying pricier bottles just because you sometimes can't tell the difference in blind tastings is taking a stance on principle that does not make too much sense to me. How often are you really drinking your whiskey blind?
    Valid point on the definition of value - it differs from one to another. For me, knowing that something is expensive doesn't make me enjoy it more - in fact the opposite tends to be a risk (as I expect it to be that much better). But, my "value" is my enjoyment of the nose and palate of a dram - rather than in knowing it is a premium label. It doesn't make sense to me to pay $30 for a can of Coke that is dressed up if you don't enjoy the contents of said can that much more than the $1 can. On the other hand, if you're paying the premium to collect something rare - I completely understand. I just enjoy drinking too much to collect it
    Gary
    =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
    "Too much of anything is bad, but too much of good whiskey is barely enough." - Mark Twain
    "Because Whiskey Matters!" - David Perkins

  4. #34
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    Re: An Instructive Story

    Blind tasting certainly levels the playing field. More and more .. for me anyway .. it leads me to beg the question of whether or not a pricey pour is really a value pour. Unfortunately, by the time I realize what I've bought .. the seller already has my money.
    Jon

  5. #35
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    An Instructive Story

    I'm in agreement that knowledge (of whatever) increasing personal enjoyment is A-ok. I call it the romance factor. It doesn't save everything, but often I enjoy something that was expensive and that I intended to enjoy. If we rode out the value pour hardline nobody would drink anything but HH white, Fitz BIB, EWB, Ritt BIB, etc. etc.

  6. #36
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    Re: An Instructive Story

    Quote Originally Posted by Gillman View Post
    Okay I watched it. Not my thing, the narration was rather crude and there were surely other factors at play such as people with their date not wanting probably to obtrude an off note. Also, even one drink can put someone's palate off, and had it been me at the table, likely I'd have had two before dinner out.

    I never really liked scenarios where people are misled, it's kind of a self-justifying prophecy.

    Does it prove something? Certainly, but only up to a point.

    Gary

    P.S. In my own case, I was entirely responsible for misleading myself!
    I think the point of it was there are more factors at play than flavor alone and we're all vulnerable to other influences on our perception. As Josh points out, the romance factor figures prominently in our experience and as long as we recognize that we're okay. We should remember that before passing judgment on someone who gets enjoyment out of something we feel is overpriced or below our standards.
    -Brian-

    "A person is smart. People are dumb, panicky, dangerous animals and you know it."
    -Agent Kay

  7. #37
    Bourbonian of the Year 2011
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    Re: An Instructive Story

    And I agree with that. There is simple sensory pleasure in handling a well-designed and labeled bottle, I know that. On the food side the equivalent is surroundings, ambiance, service. Of course it can't go too far off the track, e.g. you can't serve a Riesling as a Chardonnay to anyone familiar with those types, or a pilsner as a porter or malt as a bourbon. All I'm saying is, every time you increase the suggestibility factor, one is less likely to appraise accurately what you are eating or drinking. Distraction, including sometimes who your companions are, or having a palate dulled by a drink or two, or mistaking the context because someone has put you on, can make a big difference to accurate assessment. The only way IMO to taste properly with fairness to each product is blind tasting and even then with a relatively fresh palate.

    Gary

  8. #38
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    Re: An Instructive Story

    Quote Originally Posted by Danger View Post
    I feel like not buying pricier bottles just because you sometimes can't tell the difference in blind tastings is taking a stance on principle that does not make too much sense to me. How often are you really drinking your whiskey blind?
    Two things to clarify: 1) I can tell the difference but that difference often does not justify 3 or 4 times the price IMO; 2) I never drink my bourbon blind but my wife and I taste our bourbon blind quite frequently. She pours me two or three to sample and the next time I do the pouring. We try to minimize the influence of labels, wooden boxes, velvet bags, and cute little horsey stoppers on our assessment of what we are tasting.
    If God made anything better than bourbon he must have kept it for Hisself.

  9. #39
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    Re: An Instructive Story

    Quote Originally Posted by Yeti View Post
    I'm in agreement that knowledge (of whatever) increasing personal enjoyment is A-ok. I call it the romance factor. It doesn't save everything, but often I enjoy something that was expensive and that I intended to enjoy. If we rode out the value pour hardline nobody would drink anything but HH white, Fitz BIB, EWB, Ritt BIB, etc. etc.
    "The romance factor"??? So that means the retailer is going to kiss me before he ...??
    Jon

  10. #40
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    Re: An Instructive Story

    Don't be ridiculous. I mean romance like this...

    Last edited by Yeti; 05-03-2013 at 13:06.

 

 

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