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  1. #31
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    Jun 2012
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    Commonwealth of KY
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    2,971

    Re: One for the little guys!

    Thanks for the info. Sounds interesting and would love to try it one if these days.

  2. #32
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    Sep 2004
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    Jackson, MS
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    10,618

    Re: One for the little guys!

    Tom is your total rye production Sherry finished?
    We're Bourbon Geeks, it's who we are, it's what we do.

  3. #33
    Taster
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    Aug 2013
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    South Jersey/PHL
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    97

    Re: One for the little guys!

    Quote Originally Posted by tmckenzie View Post
    let me add to this, the rye you get from us today is 3 year old rye aged in standard 53 gallon barrels. Still finished in sherry barrels. When first released it was aged a year in small barrels. But the whole time, we were stacking it away in 53s as well.
    Thanks for the update, Tom.

  4. #34
    Advanced Taster
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    Jan 2012
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    156

    Re: One for the little guys!

    Quote Originally Posted by tmckenzie View Post
    let me add to this, the rye you get from us today is 3 year old rye aged in standard 53 gallon barrels. Still finished in sherry barrels. When first released it was aged a year in small barrels. But the whole time, we were stacking it away in 53s as well.
    Is there a way to tell which bottles are 1yr v 3yr?

  5. #35
    Advanced Taster
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    May 2013
    Location
    HTFD, CT
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    132

    Re: One for the little guys!

    I enjoy trying and supporting the micros. But, like others have said, they often don't match up to the tried and true distillers out there, especially at the prices the micros have to charge to sustain and grow their businesses. And then there is the other issue of NDPs posing as micros and whatnot.

    I have Balcones True Blue Cask Strength and have had their Brimstone. I have tasted McKenzie Bourbon & Rye at my restaurant where we carry both. I have a bottle of Dad's Hat vermouth finished rye, Ransom Spirits WhipperSnapper, Black Dirt bourbon and a King's County bourbon. We carry a few others at work (Berkshire, can't recall the others, we are a local/farm to table restaurant and like to carry regionally produced spirits) that I haven't tasted but not enough or recently enough to comment on them. I have tried Koval, Old Potrero and some other micros when traveling, but again, not enough to really make an assessment.

    I really enjoy the Balcones products, the WhipperSnapper and the Black Dirt. The Dad's Hat is pretty good but I haven't grown to love it, maybe I will. It is a fairly new addition to my bar.

    What I have noticed and what I was actually planning on asking this forum is a common thread between pretty much all of the micros I have tried. They all seem to have a sweet malt & cereal grain nose and flavor to them. Not sure if that is exactly what I would use to describe it...but it is as close as I can at the moment. Some of them have very very little of it (Balcones, WhipperSnapper), others have it by the boat load (McKenzie). Either way, I get this nose and flavor in all of these micros in ways I have never experienced in larger producers whiskey. It is not always bad, but sometimes I am not in the mood for it and it does not agree with me. Other times, I enjoy it quite a bit. Does anyone else know what I am referring to and would someone be able to tell me why the micros in particular are likely to have this nose/flavor?

  6. #36
    Connoisseur
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
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    916

    Re: One for the little guys!

    None of our stuff sets on store shelves long. I would venture to say anything on the shelf now is 3. We switched a while back. Really good rye. In standard barrels I prefer to drink it at 18 months. It ages faster as do all ryes, but since we barrel at 100 proof, it ones around fast. I was tasting through the first rye off the new continuous still the other day. Stuff from may really has spice coming through, with a heavier body to it. Should age very nicely.

  7. #37
    Taster
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    Aug 2013
    Location
    South Jersey/PHL
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    97

    Re: One for the little guys!

    Quote Originally Posted by tmckenzie View Post
    None of our stuff sets on store shelves long. I would venture to say anything on the shelf now is 3. We switched a while back. Really good rye. In standard barrels I prefer to drink it at 18 months. It ages faster as do all ryes, but since we barrel at 100 proof, it ones around fast. I was tasting through the first rye off the new continuous still the other day. Stuff from may really has spice coming through, with a heavier body to it. Should age very nicely.
    Mine was batch #12/2013

  8. #38
    Advanced Taster
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    May 2010
    Location
    Leopold Bros. Distillery
    Posts
    107

    Re: One for the little guys!

    Quote Originally Posted by JKLS View Post
    What I have noticed and what I was actually planning on asking this forum is a common thread between pretty much all of the micros I have tried. They all seem to have a sweet malt & cereal grain nose and flavor to them. Not sure if that is exactly what I would use to describe it...but it is as close as I can at the moment. Some of them have very very little of it (Balcones, WhipperSnapper), others have it by the boat load (McKenzie). Either way, I get this nose and flavor in all of these micros in ways I have never experienced in larger producers whiskey. It is not always bad, but sometimes I am not in the mood for it and it does not agree with me. Other times, I enjoy it quite a bit. Does anyone else know what I am referring to and would someone be able to tell me why the micros in particular are likely to have this nose/flavor?
    Two things. One, the larger distillers generally age their spirits longer. As you said, sometimes you are not in the mood for that, and sometimes you are. I'm the exact same way, and that's why we have two whiskies that are younger----because I like to taste the work I did in the mash tuns and the fermenters. Sometimes I want heavier oak influence, and that's why we're putting away BIB expressions that will be 4-15 years old when bottled.

    And secondly, recall that we use pot stills while the majors use continuous stills. So for our shop, we're putting all the solids from the fermenters into the pot, where it sits on a hot copper surface for several hours. The continuous stills are operated with live steam, and any contact with hot surfaces are only for a matter of seconds. Pot stills tend to give a more grainy and oily whiskey. I'm speaking in generalities, of course.

    You should have fun comparing tmckenzie's whiskey over the next few years. He's switched from pot stills to continuous. You will be able to see the difference in the finished whiskey for yourself. I'm sure he can speak to the change better than I.

  9. #39
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    Jan 2010
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    916

    Re: One for the little guys!

    Quote Originally Posted by SqueakScolari View Post
    Mine was batch #12/2013
    . Yep, you got the older stuff for sure. In fact that batch won best ny state spirit this year.

  10. #40
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    Join Date
    Jan 2010
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    916

    Re: One for the little guys!

    Quote Originally Posted by Leopold View Post
    Two things. One, the larger distillers generally age their spirits longer. As you said, sometimes you are not in the mood for that, and sometimes you are. I'm the exact same way, and that's why we have two whiskies that are younger----because I like to taste the work I did in the mash tuns and the fermenters. Sometimes I want heavier oak influence, and that's why we're putting away BIB expressions that will be 4-15 years old when bottled.

    And secondly, recall that we use pot stills while the majors use continuous stills. So for our shop, we're putting all the solids from the fermenters into the pot, where it sits on a hot copper surface for several hours. The continuous stills are operated with live steam, and any contact with hot surfaces are only for a matter of seconds. Pot stills tend to give a more grainy and oily whiskey. I'm speaking in generalities, of course.

    You should have fun comparing tmckenzie's whiskey over the next few years. He's switched from pot stills to continuous. You will be able to see the difference in the finished whiskey for yourself. I'm sure he can speak to the change better than I.
    . Yes Todd, you hit it on the head. In a pot, the mash boiling for hours degrades a bit releasing flavors that do not come from a continuous. I find the new stuff we are running to be fresher, it is more oily though in a good way, you get basically what smells and tastes like a concentrated fermenter. In our beer still, the temp in the middle of the column is about 200 degrees so really you are not boiling the mash, just vaporizing the flavor and alcohol components, unlike a pot still. I am extremely pleased with what we are making.

 

 

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