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  1. #11
    Bourbonian of the Year 2011
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    Re: CJ article Brown Forman

    Bobby, Budweiser does not age its beer in beechwood barrels. Rather, beechwood chips are added to tanks of newly fermented beer to precipitate out residual yeast and protein particles. The concept, in other words, is clarification, not maturation or imparting woody flavour. Sam Cecil has written that experiments were done in the 1940's to add wood chips to whiskey to hurry up the aging process, but it didn't work, so they went back to the old way of aging.

    Gary

  2. #12
    Bourbonian of the Year 2003 and Super Moderator
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    Re: CJ article Brown Forman

    Gary, I remember now , they only claim "Beechwood Aged".Without going too far afield here, In another post where discussing the vatting of light and overaged Bourbons sound intriguing. It's on the " to do" list

  3. #13
    Enthusiast
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    Re: CJ article Brown Forman

    Shame on the Candians? Althought they can add a variety of things, can you guess what they add most often? ...BOURBON! So give them SOME credit. (I think...)

  4. #14
    Bourbonian of the Year 2011
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    Re: CJ article Brown Forman

    Well, most Canadians live within 100 miles of the U.S. border, and we have the same general cultural background as Americans, and now we have NAFTA, so the differences are not as great as they once seemed..

    Bobby is right of course that Budweiser claims beechwood aging. Adding the wood chips (which I believe are sterilised to take out the wood taste) is part of the production process, so it is a type of aging, to produce a clear product. The beechwood method is an old European method of filtration of beer, still followed here and there around the world.

    Adding an older woody bourbon to a younger sharp/grainy one will impart some wood taste to the whole, so it is kind of a short cut, but it works to a degree, I have tried it before.

    Maybe adding charred oak wood chips to barrels of young whiskey did not fully copy the normal-aged product because while the char taste would get in faster to the young whiskey, the oxidation process (air converting congeners to fruity esters and other pleasing flavours) isn't speeded up in the same way.

    Gary

  5. #15
    Bourbonian of the Year 2009 and Virtuoso
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    Re: CJ article Brown Forman

    Could you imagine a future for a drink that picked up turpentine and Creosote flavors from the barrel?Maybe there's room in the future for an alcohol based drink with essense of oak added.
    The Greek wine trade makes a white wine called Retsina in which they add pine essence (tar). It tastes and smells like good 'ol PineSol. They say it helps digest the greasy lamb they like to eat. It is definitely a taste not to be acquired. It is a common practice around the world for the wine industry to add oak chips to large stainless steel tanks of wine in order to add oak flavors to less expensive wines. Enough about wine....back to bourbon.

 

 

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