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  1. #11
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    Re: Paying for a Recipe

    Used to be, now it seems mashbills are below 60 or well above.

  2. #12

    Re: Paying for a Recipe

    Quote Originally Posted by squire View Post
    I can't tell from the website, was this whisky made at Mt. Vernon or by someone using George's well publicized recipe.
    Looks like its made at the Hillrock Distillery in New York, with a portion made at Mt Vernon. Looks like Mt Vernon may be partnering with these guys? http://www.drinkupny.com/SearchResul...x=0&Submit.y=0

  3. #13

    Re: Paying for a Recipe

    The entire booze industry is based on smoke, mirrors and inflated brand images.

    Nearly every company out there uses some form of creative back story for their products.

    Bourbon and whiskey is not excluded either. Makers mark brands itself as a small family run company out in little old loretto. Hand dipped the old fashioned way. The hand dipping is true but little else is done the old fashioned way.

    Not to mention that all distilleries use the same recipe for numerous "distinct" product lines.

    Big beer companies are the masters of this practice. Offer nearly identical products with different brand names at different price points to different segments of the market.

  4. #14
    Connoisseur
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    Re: Paying for a Recipe

    Quote Originally Posted by VAGentleman View Post
    Looks like its made at the Hillrock Distillery in New York, with a portion made at Mt Vernon. Looks like Mt Vernon may be partnering with these guys? http://www.drinkupny.com/SearchResul...x=0&Submit.y=0
    Good catch. I hope the historical society share of the proceeds justifies whatever itty-bitty of authenticity they add to the partnership.
    If God made anything better than bourbon he must have kept it for Hisself.

  5. #15
    Bourbonian of the Year 2002 and Guru
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    Re: Paying for a Recipe

    Taken from the "Drink Up NY" site linked above, this is Hillrock's description of the product.

    "Located in the heart of the historic Hudson Valley, Hillrock Estate Distillery is proud to be one of the few 'field-to-glass' whiskey producers in the world, as well as the first U.S. distillery since before Prohibition to floor malt and handcraft whiskey on site from estate-grown grain. Led by owner Jeffrey Baker and renowned Master Distiller Dave Pickerell, Hillrock's commitment to quality embodies the rich history of craft distilling in the Hudson Valley.

    "George Washington was not only the successful commanding general of the American Revolution and the first President of the United States, he was also responsible for creating one of the largest whiskey-making operations in 18th century America. Based on Washington's original whiskey recipe, Hillrock's George Washington Rye is an unaged spirit brimming with notes of fresh grain, peppery spice and a touch of dried herbs. Each bottle contains a portion of whiskey made on Washington's stills in the newly reconstructed distillery on the museum grounds in Mount Vernon, Virginia."


    The connection here is Dave Pickerell, former master distiller at Maker's Mark. Many master distillers have participated in distilling events at Mount Vernon (as have I) but Dave has been the most active, returning year after year. Tom McKenzie, a participant here, has also participated in those events. The restored distillery at Mount Vernon runs water most of the time, but occasionally they bring in people like Dave and Tom to distill spirits in the restored distillery, which is set up as nearly as they can determine exactly like Washington had it. Everything they do is as historically accurate as possible. They even wear 18th century-style clothes.

    The recipe, i.e., mash bill, is based on the volumes of grain sent from the estate's mill to the distillery in 1797, according to estate records. This is a serious historical project that has been going on for nearly 20 years. It has largely been funded by the beverage alcohol industry but the project has been under the control of the scholars at Mount Vernon.

    What I assume is that, wanting a product to sell in the gift shop at Mount Vernon but not being able to generate enough volume from the replica distillery, Dave and the Mount Vernon folks came up with this idea. Dave will make the same recipe on the equipment at Hillrock and mix in a little of the spirit made on the replica distillery at Mount Vernon, thereby giving both Mount Vernon and Hillrock something to sell.

    Because of all that background, you can't really compare this to any other product. It's one of a kind. Yes, it's a novelty, but it's also a pretty good recreation of what Washington's distillery made, as nearly as we know. If you like that sort of thing, this is the sort of thing you will like.

  6. #16
    Enthusiast
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    Apr 2013
    Location
    Harrisburg, Oregon
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    455

    Re: Paying for a Recipe

    Quote Originally Posted by P&MLiquorsEric View Post
    The entire booze industry is based on smoke, mirrors and inflated brand images.

    Nearly every company out there uses some form of creative back story for their products.

    Bourbon and whiskey is not excluded either. Makers mark brands itself as a small family run company out in little old loretto. Hand dipped the old fashioned way. The hand dipping is true but little else is done the old fashioned way.

    Not to mention that all distilleries use the same recipe for numerous "distinct" product lines.

    Big beer companies are the masters of this practice. Offer nearly identical products with different brand names at different price points to different segments of the market.
    I remember seeing this originally when I was like 10 and honestly not a week has gone by that I have not thought about it

  7. #17
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    Jun 2012
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    390

    Re: Paying for a Recipe

    Good info, Chuck. I guess the next question is whether the method and tradition merit the price, which is purely subjective. From my perspective, I see a 375ml unaged rye for $65 at my local store and I can't help but think its a marketing ploy to sell something at an insanely inflated price.
    Justin

  8. #18
    Enthusiast
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Southwest MI
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    378

    Re: Paying for a Recipe

    As Chuck pointed out, it's not so much the recipe, it's the fact that at least some of it is made at the reconstructed Mt Vernon distillery the old-fashioned way: backbreaking manual labor.
    Seeing is believing: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x4CGAS8F3SU
    Pete

    I hate scotch.

  9. #19
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    May 2012
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    Charleston, WV
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    Re: Paying for a Recipe

    Chuck's info certainly helped put this product, and its back story, in prospective ... I wouldn't pay the price, but I can see the novelty value.
    Sto lat!!!

    bllygthrd

  10. #20
    Advanced Taster
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    Apr 2010
    Location
    Loveland CO
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    173

    Re: Paying for a Recipe

    [QUOTE=cowdery;353460]Taken from the "Drink Up NY" site linked above, this is Hillrock's description of the product.

    "Located in the heart of the historic Hudson Valley, Hillrock Estate Distillery is proud to be one of the few 'field-to-glass' whiskey producers in the world, as well as the first U.S. distillery since before Prohibition to floor malt and handcraft whiskey on site from estate-grown grain. Led by owner Jeffrey Baker and renowned Master Distiller Dave Pickerell, Hillrock's commitment to quality embodies the rich history of craft distilling in the Hudson Valley.

    "George Washington was not only the successful commanding general of the American Revolution and the first President of the United States, he was also responsible for creating one of the largest whiskey-making operations in 18th century America. Based on Washington's original whiskey recipe, Hillrock's George Washington Rye is an unaged spirit brimming with notes of fresh grain, peppery spice and a touch of dried herbs. Each bottle contains a portion of whiskey made on Washington's stills in the newly reconstructed distillery on the museum grounds in Mount Vernon, Virginia.

    Good info, thanks Chuck. I love a good historical link. With it being the 150th anniversary of Gettyburg I can't believe someone hasn't partnered with Terressentia to make General Lee "Uh oh" Unaged White Dog.
    dumb question: was the rye washington produced unaged? If not, dumb question 2: are they barreling to produce an aged version?
    Last edited by mark fleetwood; 07-02-2013 at 20:03.
    Mark
    "...that we here highly resolve that these empty bottles shall not have been drunk in vain..."

 

 

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