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  1. #21
    Advanced Taster
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    May 2013
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    HTFD, CT
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    166

    Re: "Bourbon" in used barrels

    Quote Originally Posted by Andre28 View Post
    oddly I haven't really liked the Canadian Whiskeys I have tried. Pretty much was just after a classic bourbon mash bill, aged in used casks for a length of time comparable to some of the nicer scotches. In my book that is 15-21 years, but it seems such a beast is quite rare.
    The Hirsch 20 mentioned above is exactly what you are looking for. Bourbon mash, used cooperage, 20 years old. Not crazy expensive and can be found since most bourbon diehards won't touch the stuff.

    http://caskers.com/product/hirsch-20/

    Sold out there but it is still on shelves around me.

  2. #22

    Re: "Bourbon" in used barrels

    Cheers, you are right, that fits the ticket. Getting one in Australia will now be the challenging part! Thanks for all the responses.

  3. #23
    Connoisseur
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    Oct 2010
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    Brooklyn, NY
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    678

    Re: "Bourbon" in used barrels

    Quote Originally Posted by squire View Post
    That's because whisky ages faster in the warm climate of Kentucky than the cold climate of Scotland. Combine that with new charred barrels and 8-10 years become close to optimum before the barrel influence becomes strong enough to throw the Bourbon out of balance. Older Bourbons can have the wood effect softened by selective filtering but the presence is still prominent.
    Squire's comment about some bourbons (i.e. TN whiskeys) using filtering to soften the palate made me wonder if one of the special/older Dickels might be something you'd be interested in. I think it was Mike Veach who I heard say that Dickel 12 really was 12-16 years old until recently, but now I don't think that's the case. But it's still probably 8-10 yrs (maybe?) and their are some special store select bottlings that are up to 14 years old. Anyway, I think the Lincoln County Process does aim to mellow and subdue the whiskey in a way that might fit what you are describing. Personally, I like Dickel 12 quite alot, though it is pretty idiosyncratic, as has been discussed on this board at length.
    There are two ways of getting home; and one of them is to stay there. - GK Chesterton

  4. #24
    Apprentice
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    Dec 2012
    Location
    Montreal, Quebec
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    49

    Re: "Bourbon" in used barrels

    Howdy!

    I'm not entirely certain about the mash bills, but you might want to seek out Canadian Club 20 year old, Canadian Club 12 year old, Danfield's 21 year old, Wiser's 18 year old, Century Reserve 21 year old, and Gibson's Finest 12 Years Old (Gibson also has some older whisky, but I have not tried any of it).


    While the percentage, and types of grains used in Canadian whisky similar to American whiskey. One of the main differences of Canadian whisky is that each grain is distilled separately. Then depending on the company/label/expression they are "married" before or after aging. There is also likely to be some grain neutral spirit and possibly caramel coloring. The rules are extremely lax when it comes to making Canadian whisky - basically, aged three years, and made on this side of the border.

    That all being said, there are quite a few great to superlative Canadian whiskies that compare favorably to some of the finer bourbons and scotches available.

  5. #25
    Guru
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    Apr 2012
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    Atlanta, GA
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    2,771

    Re: "Bourbon" in used barrels

    Greenore Irish whiskey is mostly corn (90-95% masbill I think with the rest malted barley) that is aged in used bourbon barrels. More like a corn whiskey I suppose. The previously mentioned Hirsch 20 probably is the best fit though.
    That yella whiskey runnin' down my throat like honey dew vine water and I took another slash…

    Nullum Gratuitum Prandium
    Ne Illegitimi Carborundum

  6. #26
    Guru
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    Sep 2004
    Location
    Jackson, MS
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    12,445

    Re: "Bourbon" in used barrels

    I wouldn't say I'm past the age of exploration but I am at an age where I'll take it the way they make it and be glad for the opportunity.
    We're Bourbon Geeks, it's who we are, it's what we do.

  7. #27

    Re: "Bourbon" in used barrels

    Thanks again for all the replies guys. I will keep an eye out for many of the products mentioned. If the price is halfway decent I will give them a go, but depending on who is importing it into Australia it can go for 2x-10x retail stateside!

  8. #28
    Virtuoso
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    Apr 2011
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    Sutton, Massachusetts
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    1,286

    Re: "Bourbon" in used barrels

    What about some of the grain distilleries in Scotland, Carsebridge or North British? Might find something there to your taste.
    Mark

  9. #29
    Connoisseur
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Louisville, Ky.
    Posts
    731

    Re: "Bourbon" in used barrels

    Actually what i said was that Dickel 12 was 10yo when I was at UD but may have risen to as much as 12-16 years of age before they shut down the distillery and and gotten their overstock problem under control.

    Mike Veach

  10. #30
    Bourbonian of the Year 2002 and Guru
    Join Date
    Sep 1999
    Location
    Chicago
    Posts
    12,634

    Re: "Bourbon" in used barrels

    Aging in new barrels creates a different style of whiskey. It's not a matter of quality and it's not a short cut or accelerated aging. It's a different style of whiskey that emphasizes wood extractives. Whiskeys aged in used barrels aren't a little lower in extractives, they are a lot lower. You can't get a bourbon flavor profile from used cooperage, no matter how long you age it or what else you do. It won't taste like bourbon because most of the flavors we associate with bourbon come from that fresh, charred barrel. In a second use barrel they simply are not there.

    Mellow Corn and Early Times are two interesting examples. The distillate used for Mellow Corn would be considered bourbon if it was aged in new, charred barrels so comparing Mellow Corn BIB, which is aged four years in used barrels, to a young bourbon like Jim Beam will show you the difference. Beam has a little bit more rye but essentially the distillates are the same, the main difference is used v new barrels.

    Early Times is interesting because it has a bourbon profile even though 20 percent of the cooperage is used. At 20 percent, it doesn't change the taste very much. ET is also only 3 years old.

    This is why Diageo's disinformation campaign is so pernicious, it's planting ideas like that. It's also interesting how what Mike said was so broadly misconstrued. Many of us started getting into bourbon during the glut period, so we got a lot of old whiskey in NAS bottles where we didn't expect it. Lucky for us to have that experience, which you can still have by dusty hunting, but the heyday of that was a long time ago.
    Last edited by cowdery; 04-21-2014 at 15:07.

 

 

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