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  1. #1
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    Single Pot Still Whiskey

    Is anyone producing it in the US?

  2. #2
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    Re: Single Pot Still Whiskey

    Balcones maybe along with several other "micro" distilleries..............? Why do you ask?
    I've never tried GTS with any sort of soda. Maybe I'm missing out; but I'm OK with that.

  3. #3
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    Re: Single Pot Still Whiskey

    Quote Originally Posted by kaiserhog View Post
    Is anyone producing it in the US?
    Single Pot Still Whiskey has a specific connotation to me as it is the name used for whiskey made with a combination of malted and unmalted barley that is typical of the older style of traditional Irish Whiskey. Used to be called Pure Pot Still Whiskey.

    In the US McKenzie was making a single pot still whiskey with 15% malted and 80% unmalted barley plus 5% oats (they were calling it by the older name, "Pure Pot Still Whiskey"). Now that they have moved to a column still it is unclear if they will continue to make the pure pot still whiskey in a pot still. Perhaps Tom McKenzie can provide an update.

    The other US made single pot still style that I know of is the Emerald 1865 made by Ransom Spirits which has a more traditional mashbill to something like Redbreast but with the addition of both oats and rye grain. Spendy and a little young but I found it very enjoyable.
    That yella whiskey runnin' down my throat like honey dew vine water and I took another slash…

    Nullum Gratuitum Prandium
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  4. #4
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    Re: Single Pot Still Whiskey

    Also depends on how you define a pot still. Most micros use a modified pot still with a rectifying column on top which actually makes it a column still no matter what the distiller calls it. My definition is simple, if it can make vodka it isn't a pot still.

    That said I agree with the definition of Pot Still or Pure Pot Still Whisky as using a mashbill consisting of malted and unmalted barley which combination came about from an unlikely source, the Irish Government, specifically the Inland Revenue service. Irish Whisky was originally 100% malted barley until the taxing authorities decided to increase revenue by raising the tax on malted barley causing the distillers to shift to predominately unmalted barley in the mashbill, which resulted in even less money to the government and the whisky style we are familiar with today.
    We're Bourbon Geeks, it's who we are, it's what we do.

  5. #5
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    Re: Single Pot Still Whiskey

    I am talking about the mix of malted and unmalted barley in the mashbill in the traditional Irish style. As I understand it, the use of oats and rye in the mashbill was quite common in the 19th Century. I am surprised not many craft distillers have tried this. Of course, I love Green Spot.

  6. #6
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    Cool Re: Single Pot Still Whiskey

    Quote Originally Posted by tanstaafl2 View Post
    Single Pot Still Whiskey has a specific connotation to me as it is the name used for whiskey made with a combination of malted and unmalted barley that is typical of the older style of traditional Irish Whiskey. Used to be called Pure Pot Still Whiskey.

    In the US McKenzie was making a single pot still whiskey with 15% malted and 80% unmalted barley plus 5% oats (they were calling it by the older name, "Pure Pot Still Whiskey"). Now that they have moved to a column still it is unclear if they will continue to make the pure pot still whiskey in a pot still. Perhaps Tom McKenzie can provide an update.

    The other US made single pot still style that I know of is the Emerald 1865 made by Ransom Spirits which has a more traditional mashbill to something like Redbreast but with the addition of both oats and rye grain. Spendy and a little young but I found it very enjoyable.
    Actually, the British Government imposed the malt tax throughout the UK. It caused riots in England. The Irish created a new style of whiskey in the process of defeating the tax. Absolutely brilliant.

  7. #7
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    Re: Single Pot Still Whiskey

    The Brits rioted over it, the Scots ignored it and the Irish defeated it.
    We're Bourbon Geeks, it's who we are, it's what we do.

  8. #8
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    Re: Single Pot Still Whiskey

    Quote Originally Posted by squire View Post
    The Brits rioted over it, the Scots ignored it and the Irish defeated it.
    I know Green Spot, Redbreat, and Powers John Lane use a combination of malted barley and unmalted barely but some older versions had rye and even some oats in the mashbill. I wonder if any craft distiller has tried this.

  9. #9
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    Re: Single Pot Still Whiskey

    Quote Originally Posted by kaiserhog View Post
    I know Green Spot, Redbreat, and Powers John Lane use a combination of malted barley and unmalted barely but some older versions had rye and even some oats in the mashbill. I wonder if any craft distiller has tried this.
    Yes, see the Emerald 1865 in post 3 above. That is exactly what it is. A recreation of an 1865 Irish Whiskey mash bill.
    That yella whiskey runnin' down my throat like honey dew vine water and I took another slash…

    Nullum Gratuitum Prandium
    Ne Illegitimi Carborundum

  10. #10
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    Re: Single Pot Still Whiskey

    Oats, rye, even bere (the original strain of barley) which is still grown in limited quantities in remote regions of the UK. They used the grains at hand and were frankly more interested in maximum alcohol production than adherence to any specific mashbill.

    I notice from the Ransom website they use that 1865 recipe "as a guide" actually making the whisky "according to our senses", so it's an interpretation of the style. Not a bad idea though and a way for a micro to compete by providing something different.

    Of course with an average list price of $90 it's hard to see who this 3 year old is competing with considering both Powers John Lane and Redbreast are four times older (12 years) and sell for 1/3 less (around $60).
    We're Bourbon Geeks, it's who we are, it's what we do.

 

 

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