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  1. #11
    Advanced Taster
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    Re: Irish Whiskey Flight-Charlotte

    My one and only bottle of Green Spot was a bit of a disappointment. It had very little of the fruit I love in Irish whiskey and too much of the "wax." My bottles of Redbreast have been much better.

    Yes, Midleton is a blend. Way overpriced. They have released some older expressions in the last couple of years that have won praise. The only one of those I have tasted (thanks again, John) was a 26yo finished in port wood. IIRC, it was rather rich for an Irish with lots of mellow fruit flavors, enhanced, no doubt, by the port wood. Tasty.

    SpeedyJohn

  2. #12
    Bourbonian of the Year 2006
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    Re: Irish Whiskey Flight-Charlotte

    Bob,
    On the Tyrconnell.
    My visual impressions were very misleading. The pale straw color and aroma lead you to the conclusion that this whiskey is harsh and young, but you can't judge a whiskey by its cover. I was pleasantly surprised by the roundness and balance, but still that White Doggish flavor. Kind of one dimensional but pleasant. It was a step down from the older Bushmills that were considerably more woody and sweeter. Drinkable. Nice Pour.

  3. #13
    Bourbonian of the Year 2011
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    Re: Irish Whiskey Flight-Charlotte

    I had two bottles over the years of Green Spot. The first was fruity as in "juicy fruit", more peach, citrus and pear-like than ported or sherried, and I think it came from maturation or the distillate, not from using casks that had held sherry or port. The second bottle was dull and oaky. Neither was particularly waxy. So it seems as if this brand will vary a lot depending on the particular bottling. Redbreast (I have a bottle at home at the moment) strikes me as a little raw in terms of the waxiness. I think Jim Murray says that the current Redbreast is fresh and vibrant (what he also calls the "brittleness" of the pot still element) whereas the Redbreast of a few yaers ago was more musty-like due to "tired casks". Personally I liked it more in the old days. I think the key is not so much the casks but the aging. I think the Redbreast of about 10 years ago was likely older than the current one, that or it may have had pre-Midleton Irish Distillers (from Dublin) pot still in it because they were adding stray casks of the old stuff to such pot still formulations until recently (unless more such oldies turn up!).

    Back to what Chuck was saying about whiskeys produced by companies no longer in operation (or, I would add, the Irish Distillers companies before the merger), some are apparently still around and Murray gives fascinating taste notes on those. There are whiskeys from the late 1940's and early 1950's still to be had, at a price of course. Or he will comment on, say, a few stone jars of an ancient Jameson Dublin distillate found deep in a pub cellar under an arch. There, as here, the oldies (generally) seem to get the nod as having the best taste. He gives as one reason for that the point you made about oats and rye having been used as small grains (in very small amounts, though) until Midelton was built. The use of such exotic grains was dispensed with post-Midleton in that they were said to be not necessary or something like that. Still, if they had been added in the past it was for a reason, and therefore tasting these old ones is a way to see what those recipes were like. One old brand, Old Comber, dating from the early 1950's, still can be bought in good whiskey shops in Britian and Ireland but it is very costly. I have never had a taste of this one or any of the other oldies. I do however have a distinct reminiscence of tasting the regular Jameson in the 1970's. My step-dad used it to spike Orange Pekoe tea with. I recall that it was very waxy (and this was the regular Jameson, but clearly still very oriented to a pot still character). So I think the oldies might in fact taste like Redbreast does now or fairly close. Some surely tasted like Jameson 15 years old which is one of the great whiskeys in my view, the Lagavulin of Ireland.

    Gary


  4. #14
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    Re: Irish Whiskey Flight-Charlotte

    I have never heard of Old Bushmill's 12 or 18? I presume they are single malts? The standard US expressions are the blend, Black Bush (blend), the 10, 16, and 21yo single malts, and the current limited cask strength single malt expressions: rum, sherry, and bourbon (around 14yo I think). There is a Bushmills 12 for distillery sales, but I've never heard of an 18. Do you have any more info on these?

  5. #15
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    Re: Irish Whiskey Flight-Charlotte

    I'm glad you liked the Midleton 26yo.

    For the sake of the forum, it was made at the old Midleton distillery in the largest pot stills ever used. It is a pure pot still Irish (including some oats) combining bourbon and sherry casks for finishing in the port casks. I'm a big fan of Irish, expecially pure pot still, and IMHO this might be the best.

  6. #16
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    Re: Irish Whiskey Flight-Charlotte

    Good point. Erin Go Brah is the only Irish whiskey claiming to be a Midleton single malt. It has a significant similarity to Greenspot and seems to have some pot still character that is hard to explain in a single malt. Must be the stills...

  7. #17
    Bourbonian of the Year 2002 and Guru
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    Re: Irish Whiskey Flight-Charlotte

    I have gotten the 12 year old single malt in duty free, but haven't seen the 18 either.

  8. #18
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    Re: Irish Whiskey Flight-Charlotte

    I love all the PPS Irish and the Jameson 15 is one of the best IMHO. It is true that most Irish whiskey from before the mid 70's was PPS. I have an old bottle of Jameson 7yo PPS (Bow Street Distillery). The taste is startling. It is VERY heavy, medicinal and musty; nothing like the similar aged Greenspot. Based on a careful reading of Classic Irish Whiskey, I think traditional pure pot still (unlike the light, medium, and heavy PPS that currently make up most of the new Midleton's PPS production) did NOT have a middle cut. Triple distilling (and time in the wood) were needed to take the edge of the stuff that would normally be excluded in the foreshots and tails.

  9. #19
    Bourbonian of the Year 2006
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    Re: Irish Whiskey Flight-Charlotte

    First, I'll go back and check my notes.
    Secondly, I'll go back and check the whiskey list.
    It's more likely that I transcribed in error than Ri-Ra having a whiskey that nobody's ever heard of.

 

 

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