Welcome to the Straightbourbon.com Forums.
Page 1 of 4 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 36

Thread: Banker's Club

  1. #1
    Enthusiast
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    virginia
    Posts
    441

    Banker\'s Club

    We were in Pittsburgh this week and found a bottle of this. Anyone know it's story? I searched here but found nothing. Anybody ever seen it/had it? It was very inexpensive where I found it.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  2. #2

    Re: Banker\'s Club

    Banker's Club 80-proof bourbon is currently sold online here:
    T.R.T. International, Ltd.
    which notes its warehouses in New York, St. Petersburg (Russia, I presume) and Moscow. It appears to be an all-purpose brand, since they also list Banker's Club vodka, Scotch and rum.


  3. #3
    Bourbonian of the Year 2002 and Guru
    Join Date
    Sep 1999
    Location
    Chicago
    Posts
    12,375

    Re: Banker\'s Club

    Scobeyville, New Jersey, is the home of Laird & Co., which makes Laird's Applejack. Presumably, they are the bottler if not also the actual owner of the Banker's Club brand, which is doubtless bulk bourbon from some Kentucky producer. The TRT price list shows the BC bourbon being available in liter and 1.75 sizes only, meaning it is intended as a well bourbon on-premise and a bottom-shelf "heavy user" bourbon off-premise. In other words, a commodity; probably the low price leader in the market. I mean, look at those prices (which are case prices, by the way). Local bottlers of commodity spirits, like everything else local, have really disappeared in recent years. I wonder how old that bourbon is? See if there is an age statement hidden somewhere, probably on the back. It will say something like "aged thirty-six months."

    Then go back to TRT's home page and order me some wet blue leather.

  4. #4
    Enthusiast
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    virginia
    Posts
    441

    Re: Banker\'s Club

    I looked over the bottle pretty thoroughly and couldn't find an age statement anywhere. The back label just has the Banker's Club logo with a UPC symbol. It doesn't show well on my photo, but the neck has a crest with the motto "Dieu avec Nous." Now, my French is rusty, but doesn't that mean "God with Us?" I'm not sure how to take that on a bourbon bottle.

    We'll probably break this out for a tasting today. Just out of curiosity, can you get a rough idea of age by comparing color of known aged bourbon to it, assuming similar proof? In the bottle, compared to JB white, it looks a little dark to be only 36 months, but, at that price, it's hard to imagine it's much older.

    I like the euphemism "heavy user" bourbon. Never heard that one. I guess it's a little more pleasant at a marketing strategy meeting to say you're targeting the "heavy user" demographic than the "alcoholic" demographic!

  5. #5

    Re: Banker\'s Club

    If my remembrance of 'bourbon law' is aright, the lack of an age statement means it must be at least 4 years old.

  6. #6
    Bourbonian of the Year 2004 and Guru
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    Nelson County, Kentucky
    Posts
    2,734

    Re: Banker\'s Club

    The UPC tells alot. Heaven Hill has two of them. The most common one (the first 5 numbers) 96749...

    Usually, (but not all the time) if a age statement is not present it is considered four years old...That's on "Cat and Dog" bottlings. I will state that this is Heaven Hill's practice on labeling of product. I don't know the rules that other distilleries use.



    Bettye Jo

  7. #7
    Enthusiast
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    virginia
    Posts
    441

    Re: Banker\'s Club

    Thanks, Bettye Jo. For what it's worth, this UPC is 84848 20120. Any help with IDing the source?

    So, if I understand this correctly, there is at least a potential for a bargain, right? If a distiller sells someone reasonable quality whiskey (albeit young) at a bulk rate, and it gets bottled as is without tampering, you've just avoided paying for the logo?

    For example, if JB sold this bottler bulk rate rate 4 yo whiskey, could I have purchased JB white for $8.50/liter? (I guess that's only a bargain if you like JB white, but you get the idea.)

  8. #8
    Bourbonian of the Year 2002 and Guru
    Join Date
    Sep 1999
    Location
    Chicago
    Posts
    12,375

    Re: Banker\'s Club

    By law, any straight whiskey aged less than four years must carry an age statement. If a bottle doesn't carry an age statement, especially if it is a "bottom shelf" brand, the assumption is that it meets that requirement, but just barely.

    A producer who is selling bulk bourbon, especially on price, will use that opportunity to unload whiskey that meets all legal requirements (which are no assurance of quality) but isn't up to the company's standards for its normal brands. In other words, it will be the worst whiskey they make. In the case of Beam, don't compare to Jim Beam white. Instead, compare to Old Crow.

    Production standards being what they are today, there is very little bad bourbon produced but the worst of what is produced finds its way into bottom shelf distributor brands that are sold on price. The product is targeted to a customer who is highly price sensitive and doesn't care about quality. In the not too distant past, when there was a bourbon glut, you could get lucky and find something decent on the bottom shelf. For the most part, that no longer is the case.

  9. #9
    Enthusiast
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    virginia
    Posts
    441

    Re: Banker\'s Club

    As always, thanks for the lesson, Chuck!

    I tasted the Banker's Club on Sunday. Over ice, it was not horrible, just kind of lackluster. Funny you made the Old Crow analogy because it reminded me of Old Crow while I was having it - simple, light, slightly sweet with a little bite at the end, a harsh finish. I like the label, though!

    So, to use Beam as an example again, how does this work? They have a batch of whiskey at some phase of production that is supposed to turn into Old Crow, a bulk order is placed, and it is diverted to become Banker's Club instead?

    Or is Old Crow a "default" brand for the whiskey that doesn't make the JB white grade and, therefore, no whiskey is predestined to be Old Crow, but a certain predictable quantity winds up in a bulk order/Old Crow category?

    Or is there a batch of suboptimal whiskey that doesn't even make Old Crow standards laying around waiting for a bulk order to come?

  10. #10
    Bourbonian of the Year 2002 and Guru
    Join Date
    Sep 1999
    Location
    Chicago
    Posts
    12,375

    Re: Banker\'s Club

    I agree about the label.

    As for your question, I can't really answer it. For the most part, except as there are specific recipes for certain products, a given barrel of bourbon isn't predestined to be a certain brand. In the case of Jim Beam, something like 90 percent of their output is sold as standard Jim Beam white label, so there isn't a lot that slips through either below or above that, and yet Old Crow is clearly not the same as Jim Beam white. The difference is most likely age.

    Aging costs money, so the younger you can sell a whiskey the better off you are financially. If a buyer is looking only for the cheapest thing he can get that is legally bourbon, the seller probably just selects some barrels that are barely legal. I don't think they deliberately go looking for crap or have a few barrels already designated as crap to go to when the time comes, but I'm making a few assumptions here.

    Maybe those are some insights but not a full answer.

 

 

Similar Threads

  1. Canadian Club 12 yr. Reserve
    By wrbriggs in forum Foreign Whiskey
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 11-14-2004, 04:31

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Back to top