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  1. #81
    Bourbonian of the Year 2004 and Guru
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    Nelson County, Kentucky
    Posts
    2,735

    Re: Weller Antique Error?

    I don't know for sure if it was created when my family of distillers worked for Pappy...Actually, Pop Beam and Elmo worked there at the same time in the early days. I have a picture of them standing in front of the distillery. Hell, all of the "7 sons" worked for the VanWinkle family

    I have a letter from Pappy sent to my Uncle Wilmer (Master Distiller, Yellowstone 1956). That letter was sent in regard to Pop Beams death. Pappy states in that letter that they made wonderful bourbon, with exception on the first day... That clue (in my opinion) told me that they were probably "inventing something" for Pappy He also went on to say that he was the Dean Distiller of his Age...

    I guess it's something we will never know for sure.

    Will McGill was my great Uncle. He was brother to my great-grandmother Katie McGill Beam

    Bettye Jo

  2. #82
    Connoisseur
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Louisville, Ky.
    Posts
    723

    Re: Weller Antique Error?

    Bettye Jo,
    I was basing the Elmo Beam information on a photo album that Julian Van Winkle owns and let us copy for the U D Archive. In that album it lists Elmo Beam as Master Distiller but there are several other Beams identified.
    I think you may be right about the "clue" in your letter - it certainly matches the time frame for the experimentation period I am talking about.

    We (myself included) often forget when we refer to distillery owners as "distillers" (people such as Pappy Van Winkle, E. H. Taylor, James E. Pepper, etc...) that the fact is they probably had a Beam, a Dant, a Wathen or a Medley working for them as the "Master Distiller". These are the people that often made the true discoveries and improvements, but never received the credit they deserved.
    Mike Veach

  3. #83
    Connoisseur
    Join Date
    Aug 2000
    Location
    Louisville, Kentucky
    Posts
    654

    Re: Weller Antique Error?

    Mike & Bettye Jo,
    Since I tend to prefer the wheaters, I'm impressed to know (after all this time) that it probably was a Beam! I have been interested in who actually pioneered the wheat mashbill, since MM started bragging about doing it in their advertising...
    the fact is they probably had a Beam, a Dant, a Wathen or a Medley working for them as the "Master Distiller". These are the people that often made the true discoveries and improvements, but never received the credit they deserved.
    I absolutely agree 100%! I remember telling Elmer T. Lee how honored I was to meet him. I told him I was a Master Distiller Groupie, and he laughed. He thought I was kidding.
    I wasn't...

  4. #84
    Enthusiast
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Central LA, Louisiana :-)
    Posts
    310

    Re: Best tasting inexpensive bourbon?

    EC 12YO best in the range

    WT and OF are good choices

    EW BIB is a nice 100 proof for about $12

    I take AA over Ezra unless I can get Old Ezra in that price.


  5. #85
    Apprentice
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Western PA
    Posts
    41

    Re: Best tasting inexpensive bourbon?

    My two favorite inexpensive bourbons have to be Old Grand Dad 86 and Elija Craig 12.

  6. #86
    Apprentice
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Indianapolis, IN
    Posts
    27

    Re: Best tasting inexpensive bourbon?

    For my tastes, AAA is the best inexpensive bourbon. Its about $15 a bottle and good to the last drop. I always have a least a couple bottles on hand.

    Ike

  7. #87
    Enthusiast
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Burlington VT, USA
    Posts
    336

    Re: Best tasting inexpensive bourbon?

    I can only get AAA 10 star, not AAA 10-year old... from what I've heard, this is the case everywhere outside of Kentucky. I've been told that the 10 star is probably not worth buying, but I might pick some up anyway (except I have to special order it).

  8. #88
    Bourbonian of the Year 2002 and Guru
    Join Date
    Sep 1999
    Location
    Chicago
    Posts
    12,609

    Re: Best tasting inexpensive bourbon?

    I can get the 10-year-old here in Chicago. I have a bottle now.

    The 10-star is 90 proof and six years old, so it's probably not too bad, it's just not 10 years old. I haven't had it, at least not recently. I suspect that at some point they went to this younger (hence cheaper) product in some markets, while still keeping the AAA name and a numeral "10" on the label. This is what Wild Turkey did a few years ago, when they removed the age statement, which was 8 years, but replaced it with a meaningless "No. 8 Brand" so no one would notice.

    The six-year-old age claim for AAA 10 Star comes from the website. I don't know if it's on the label or not.

    The standard AA is 80 proof and the last time I had it, it was three years old, and wasn't very good.

  9. #89
    Enthusiast
    Join Date
    Mar 2000
    Location
    Midland, MI
    Posts
    455

    wheat in whiskey, bourbon and canadian

    Being somewhat curious about the use of wheat, I stuck "wheat whiskey" into
    Google, and turned up a Canadian (!) distillery making "Cheltenham Wheat
    Whiskey" in 1848, and a picture of a barrel, circa 1860, from a Waterloo
    (Canada again!) distillery, marked "EXTRA RECTIFIED RYE AND WHEAT WHISKEY.
    HESPELER AND RANDALL". (Randall & Co would later become Seagrams).

    My guess is that the Canadians used wheat because it was produced nearby.

    I also turned up a "design patent" (early form of copyright?) for
    "Simon Crow's Pure White Wheat Whiskey" (1864). Also turned up
    an "Essence of Old Virginia Wheat Whiskey" advert (no date).

    So there's evidence of wheat being used in whiskey in the 1840s-1860s.

    I'd certainly like to hear form others who know more about early bourbon
    formulations in the early larger, commercial distilleries, and how
    their recipes developed and evolved.

    Tim Dellinger

 

 

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