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Thread: Describing Rye

  1. #11
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    Re: Describing Rye

    Yeah, those are essentially what we can get, too.

    The website for our state-run liquor monopoly lists availability as follows:

    Jim Beam Rye - commonly available at most stores
    Wild Turkey Rye - commonly available at most stores
    Old Overholt - commonly available at most stores
    Old Potrero (at $100.85) - 1 unit available in the entire state (!)
    Rittenhouse Rye 100° - 1 unit available in the entire state (!) an hour north of Seattle
    Rittenhouse Rye 80° - 9 units at the big downtown store

    I'm planning to try the Jim Beam next. My options are pretty limited, but I've wanted to try that one anyway.

  2. #12
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    Re: Describing Rye

    I paid close attention to the mouth-feel of the Scotch I was drinking (Ardbeg). If anything, it felt thicker and weightier than what I remembered of the WT rye feel. In any case, I certainly wouldn't have characterized this Scotch as "thin".
    Exactly. Ardbeg (and the other heavily-peated scothes) are my favorite scotch. Even the 10yo can't be described as "thin." I think scotch to bourbon/rye comparisons (regarding taste, body, flavor, etc.) are very difficult given the vast differences between ingredients, distilling methods and casking. For me, trying to compare the two would be like comparing beer to hard cider.

  3. #13
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    Re: Describing Rye

    In any case, I certainly wouldn't have characterized this Scotch as "thin".

    If you are drinking a scotch that is as full bodied as bourbon, give me a name, I'd love to try it.

  4. #14
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    Re: Describing Rye

    The Ardbeg 10 would be a good place to start. From my experience, most of the Islay heavyweights would hold up quite well against bourbon in terms of body. Laphroaig (esp the cask strength version) or Lagavulin would also be recommendations.

    These have very different flavor profiles from bourbon, of course, but if we're talking character and texture, I'd recommend trying them.

  5. #15
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    Re: Describing Rye

    Another good suggestion for something "hearty" to use in a bourbon / rye /
    scotch comparison would be Aberlour's Abunadh. Although it's aged in
    sherry casks, it's still got a big taste. It's on the "heavier" end
    of the scotch spectrum.

    Tim Dellinger

  6. #16
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    Re: Describing Rye

    I agree with you Clayton the Ardbeg 10 is a wonderful example of scotch being able to stand the test against bourbon. Other examples would be:

    Islay:

    Ardbeg 1977
    Laphroig 10 (cask strength edition)
    Lagavulin 12 (cask - what a rush)

    Orkney:

    Highland Park 18 and 25


    For starters I would recommend HP18. The Islay’s are some hefty things start with the Ardbeg 10 there.
    Hope I won't be excluded from the board for recommending scotch, but anyways you can't really compare the two.


  7. #17
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    Re: Describing Rye

    but anyways you can't really compare the two.
    Amen; totally different products.

  8. #18
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    Re: Describing Rye

    Although it's aged in
    sherry casks, it's still got a big taste.
    I don't understand the sherry cask appeal. I had some McCallen 18 a few days ago, and didn't think much of it. Very smooth light taste, but then this sour sherry hits you. Maybe 18 years is too long.

  9. #19
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    Re: Describing Rye

    In my opinion, the Macallan 12 is completely over-sherried. I just
    don't like the heavily sherried taste. I tend to like things like
    Glenmorangie's standard issue, aged only in ex-bourbon. Sometimes
    a mix of casks, or things like the Balvenie Doublewood are good, but
    in my opinion, sherry casks should only be used in moderation! Or
    perhaps heavy on the third-fill sherry casks...

    I don't think any of the Macallans could really hold up when tasted
    side-by-side with a rye. Sherry can sometimes help a lighter, fruitier
    style scotch, but that tends to come off as "weak" next to a rye.

    Tim Dellinger

  10. #20
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    Re: Describing Rye

    I haven't had a lot of experience with sherry finishes but have always been fond of Black Bush, which is a Bushmills Irish whiskey finished in sherry casks.

 

 

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