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  1. #1
    Novice
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    St. Louis MO.
    Posts
    2

    What will I end up with?

    Hi all first post here. I am a truck driver here in St. Louis the company I drive for hauls mostly booze and barrels. I bought a small barrel from Independent Stave Lebanon MO. it is made the same as the regular barrels chared inside. I filled it with inexpensive Old Crow. I plan to just let this sit around for a long time mostly a good conversation peice. Will this age this way or will I just have old Old Crow (ha ha) in say 10 years or so would I need to store it in an outdoor shed for the temp dif or can it just sit around inside? I put two 1.75 liter bottles in the barrel and then topped off with a little water. Anyone ever try this even if nothing happens its still kinda neat.

  2. #2
    Enthusiast
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Burlington VT, USA
    Posts
    336

    Re: What will I end up with?

    Well, I'm not really sure that additional aging will do much to improve the flavor of Old Crow. However, it'll definitely make a good conversation piece!

  3. #3
    Advanced Taster
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Park City, UT
    Posts
    198

    Re: What will I end up with?

    It may result in a smoother bourbon. If I remember correctly, Jack Daniels charcoal filters the Gentlemen Jack once, put it back in a barrel, then age it some more, charcoal again, then bottle it.

    It may also pick up additional flavors from the new barrel. However, you will need to store it outside year 'round, as it is the temperature change that draws the bourbon into the wood and forces it back out. In used barrels, you can take the individual slats apart and see how deep the bourbon got.

    It's an interesting little project you've got going. I think some distillers have exact specifications for their barrels (not exactly sure what makes 'em all different) so your barrel may "taste" different than the original barrels used for aging. Let us know how this turns out in a few years!!!

  4. #4
    Guru
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Central Arizona (near Prescott), U.S.A.
    Posts
    4,235

    Re: What will I end up with?

    RFR,

    I have no idea what you will end up with, but I envy you the opportunity to find out.

    If I were doing the experiment, I might be more inclined to start with a bourbon that I like, from a line that has longer-aged bottlings I like even better.

    Wild Turkey 101 would probably be my first choice. If I could transform it into something even a little more like WT Russell's Reserve, or, better yet, WT 12 y/o, I'd make it a point to live long enough to see the end of the experiment.

    BTW, there have been threads here about the effect of motion on the aging process, whether on a flatboat headed for New Orleans or on a sailing ship. If you could manage to take your test barrel with you on your commercial travels, you might intensify the aging process.

    BTW #2, if a local fellow named Dane shows up claiming to be the St. Louis municipal bourbon inspector, don't fall for it.


    Yours truly,
    Dave Morefield

  5. #5
    Guru
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Moscow Mills, MO
    Posts
    2,507

    Re: What will I end up with?

    Being the St Louis Municipal Bourbon Inspector...(Thanks Dave for taking away my in...)

    I'm wondering a couple of things that might influence the outcome of your experiment:

    1. the char level they put on the barrel.
    2. whether the smaller and probably thinner staves are made from the inner or outer parts of the oak logs which could control the amount of carmelization.
    3. where you plan to store it and how much temperature fluctuation can be expected in that location.

    I agree that this is a worthy experiment and will patiently await the findings when you decide to open it. After all it will need to be inspected....

  6. #6
    Bourbonian of the Year 2011
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Toronto, Canada
    Posts
    9,086

    Re: What will I end up with?

    Indeed, and being too far away to participate, I nominate Dane as an available and experienced taster.

    My take on this: I think what you're doing is great. Based on data from the 1920's, it appears that placing such a keg in a car trunk for a couple of months can hasten the aging. So put it in, drive on bumpy roads, fuggitaboutit until Labor Day, and then check it out - I think it will be great.

    Gary

  7. #7

    Re: What will I end up with?

    ...it appears that placing such a keg in a car trunk for a couple of months can hasten the aging. So put it in, drive on bumpy roads, fuggitaboutit until Labor Day, and then check it out...
    Of course, should your driving happen across the Tennessee state line, I'm the border customs bourbon inspector...

  8. #8
    Disciple
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Japan, (American)
    Posts
    1,673

    Re: What will I end up with?

    Hi Dave,
    I see your point, but I think the Old Crow experiment is more interesting. I haven't had any of it and if I do I am not sure it would be the same Old Crow that you guys get in the States. Still, the idea of 'fixing' a cheap, bad bourbon is cool. It might matter why Old Crow is bad. Is it underaged? Aged in the wrong part of the warehouse and thus underaged? Aged in bad barrels? Was the white dog bad in the first place? If one of the first two, then the extra aging might be just the ticket. If one of the later two then more barrel time might not be able to save it.
    Ed

  9. #9
    Disciple
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Japan, (American)
    Posts
    1,673

    Re: What will I end up with?

    Hi RaceFanRay,
    I was wondering, is your barrel a new charred barrel or has it had bourbon in it before?
    Ed

  10. #10
    Bourbonian of the Year 2011
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Toronto, Canada
    Posts
    9,086

    Re: What will I end up with?

    I am sure the white dog, is "all the same", i.e., while each producer's varies due to differing proportions of rye to corn (or wheat to corn) and distillation proof, each product is basically similar. Entry proof will differ too, but I don't think that is material since the law sets a standard by stating that 125 proof is the maximum. I think the main factors are length of initial aging, barrel type and warehouse conditions. So everything in other words is calculated in this experiment to improve the quality of the bourbon.

    The other way to improve an indifferent bourbon is through blending. I had a bottle of Jim White White Label I wanted to improve. I also had a Corner Creek which is a high end whiskey but one I found (in this current bottling) somewhat woody and bland. I added 6 ounces of Beam White to 20 of Corner Creek and it is remarkable how good is the result. The rough character of the Beam was completely absorbed in the Corner Creek and the latter was made fuller and richer yet without seeming to taste of the Beam at all. To do this I intentionally kept the proportions to about 4:1.

    Another experiment as mentioned earlier was blending 40% George Dickel with 60% of Jack Daniel. Again it is remarkable how the blending produced somehing quite new and better (in my view) than either alone. Somehow the strong Jack taste (that "liquorice" accent) was almost neutralised while lending youth and body to the older Dickel. Contrarily the Dickel's mineral or "vitamins" note was considerably reduced, to its benefit in my view. The resultant flavor was like a rich fudgy bourbon, almost like an Elmer T. Lee, say. I used high end whiskies - 10 year old Dickel Single Barrel and a personal mingling of two Single Barrel Jack Daniels and some regular Jack - but I see no reason it wouldn't work with regular Dickel and all-regular Jack because the premium version of each tastes like the regular one (just slightly more intense).

    Still, the oak keg experiment is fascinating. I might try that this summer myself. Oak kegs are easy to buy at wine supply stores and they come charred I understand. If I were to do this I likely would use Wild Turkey or Beam White Label, or a bottom shelf brand such as Old Taylor.

 

 

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