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Thread: Paddy Irish

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  1. #1
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    Paddy Irish

    I was lucky enough to be in Ireland recently and tasted five different Irish whiskeys. The one that surprised me was Paddy. Michael Jackson does not like it at all. Since it seemed to be available in most pubs where I was in 4 towns I tried it and was pleasantly surprised. It has a nice flowery nose and taste and goes down very smooth. As I understand it Paddy is a brand that is not exported. If you are in Ireland and like Irish whiskey I suggest it. It will cost you about the same, or sometimes less, than the cost of a pint of Irish beer.

  2. #2
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    Re: Paddy Irish

    Greg, did you try draught Guinness stout there? Some people tell me Guinness in Ireland is completely different from draught Guinness here, others tell me it is the same. I had a pint once at Shannon airport (as close as I got to Dublin) and it seemed the same as here but maybe that was not a good test.

    Gary

  3. #3
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    Re: Paddy Irish

    Of course Gary, if you listen to what they say there, Guinness isn't Guinness if it crosses over water.

  4. #4
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    Irish Whiskey and Guiness

    Though I wrote about whiskey to be on topic you asked about beer.

    I was first told by a high level product development person at Diagio that Guiness would not be the same in Ireland. While we had not tasted U.S. Guiness in quite awhile I can say that it in NO way matched my memory of U.S. Guiness. However, having just tried Guiness on the European continent last night -- I'd say what is available on the continent is either the same or very close.

    As an example, my wife truly loves most stouts while I like some but not others. In the U.S. she prefers Murphy's to Guiness. In Ireland we tried them back-to-back and she clearly prefers the Guiness.

    A dram of Paddy with Guiness went down very smoothly with no ill effects, by the way

  5. #5
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    Re: Irish Whiskey and Guiness

    Re Guinness - it usually tastes better in Ireland because it doesn't rest in the pipes for very long as it is being served all the time.

    Also, I believe that there might be different gasses used to give it its head in different countries, although I am not sure if this is true.

    They don't tell you this, but in Ireland they pour about 75 percent of it and leave it rest for a minute or two before topping it up and serving it. This is really now just a tradition as it no longers affects the pint. It was originally done because the head and the body came from different taps. One was cooler and one was warmer.

    Re Paddy - I personally don't like it, but it is very popular in Ireland. It is mainly grain and is best served over ice or with a mixer, I think.

  6. #6
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    Re: Irish Whiskey and Guiness

    Do you know how Guinness draught was served before the nitro system was invented? I have heard different things about this. One person told me there was very little draught, it was mostly bottled beer. Other people say the beer was cask-conditioned (like real ale) but do not seem clear whether hand pumps were used. Some people also note the service from two casks, apparently one contained flat beer (to form the 3/4 of the pint first poured), the second cask contained more lively beer to top it with the head. There must be people in Ireland who recall how Guinness was served then but I've never got the real lowdown on that. I wonder if traditions varied in different parts of the Republic and Ulster, maybe in some areas they used handpumps, in some two casks or only bottles, etc. I still enjoy Guinness and as you say when the turnover is high it seems to taste best.

    Gary

  7. #7
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    Re: Irish Whiskey and Guiness

    Yes, one contained flatter beer and the other contained more lively beer. One was cooler than the other.

    It was generally delivered to pubs in casks which were bottled and corked by the publican.

    Dry Irish stout like Guinness was invented when the british started taxing malt, so unmalted barley was added to the mix to bring down the cost. This is very similar to traditional pure pot still Irish whiskey.

  8. #8
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    Re: Irish Whiskey and Guiness

    Thanks, but how did they dispense from the casks then, by thumb taps?

    It sounds like the publicans sold stout in two forms: in bottles they put up themselves and in draft in pint glasses.
    From which cask did they do the bottling? The flat one presumably else they would encounter a foaming problem.

    I wonder if draught Guinness today bears any relation in taste to the one drawn from the high and low casks..

    The double cask draw sounds like the idea of porter doesn't it (idea of drawing from multiple casks)..?

    Speaking of which, how did Guinness porter differ from stout service?

    Gary

  9. #9
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    Re: Irish Whiskey and Guiness

    Here is a recent article I found at BeerAdvocate.com. It seems people have been complaining about Guinness Draught in the US having changed recently, so the webmasters took to some pubs in Boston to check it out...

    Tasting reveals Guinness ain't what it used to be

    Todd Alström
    03-17-2005

    Rumblings that Guinness Draught (a so-called light Irish Dry Stout at 4.2% abv) has changed have been brought to our attention from beer drinkers across the US over the past month. To investigate we sent a crack tasting team to hit The Druid, The Burren, and The Sligo Pub – popular watering holes in the Cambridge/Somerville, MA area.

    The team, comprised of myself, Todd Alström (BeerAdvocate.com), and Dann Paquette (celebrity brewer), had our first pint of Guinness at The Druid. At first glance, the pint looked familiar, with its creamy nitro-poured head. However, a closer look revealed a very bright dark ruby color – unlike previous pints of Guinness, which were opaque, near black – allowing no light penetration. The aroma was a bit floral and sweet, as was the flavor. Where was the trademark dry and roasty character? Where was the trademark black opaque body that Guinness has always prided themselves on? Has Guinness Draught been dumbed down even further?

    To be sure, we hit The Burren in Davis Square, known for its Irish patrons and flowing Guinness. Two Guinness were ordered, same ruby color. Dann asked the bartender to look at the pints. She did and exclaimed that she was surprised to see that they were not black, and agreed that it’s different. This proved, that at the very least, we were partially sane.

    We took our pints to the corner of the bar and decided to ask two gentlemen what they thought of their pints of Guinness. Both were true Irish, long time Guinness drinkers, and absolutely shocked when they examined their pints. They too agreed that Guinness is no longer the same pint it used to be, added that it’s crap in the US, and one of the gentlemen actually forfeited his pint to the bar.

    Next, The Sligo Pub. Same thing. Not black, and a much sweeter beer – not unlike other popular nitro-poured ales. In fact, it’s very much like a nitrofied red ale, and the roasty character has been replaced with a generic sweetness for the masses. Satisfied that Guinness had changed, we left our half-full pints at the bar.

    It’s also been noted that the Guinness brewery at St. James Gate in Dublin, Ireland creates what they call a Guinness “essence,” which is shipped to contract brewers throughout the world. Sources claim this essence is then blended with a clear beer base (like the Smirnoff Ice base perhaps?) and packaged. And though Guinness is adamant that the Guinness Draught kegs coming into the US are from Ireland, the thought of shipping hundreds of thousands of kegs to the US each year is ridiculous. To boot, keg labels merely state “product of Ireland” vs. “brewed in Ireland” – a result of the essence being manufactured in Ireland, and the rest put together elsewhere?

    For the past two years BeerAdvocate.com has tried to contact Diageo, the massive parent company behind Guinness, to confirm or deny all of this, but all of our efforts have gone unanswered. We’ve been forwarded emails from angry Guinness reps in the US, but they’ve been merely robotic denials with no substance and overly defensive tones – as if we struck a truth nerve or something.

    If Diageo / Guinness would like to go the record about the production of Guinness, we’d be open to conducting an interview with an actual brewer from St. James Gate. Until that time … we’ll be drinking real Stouts.
    Link to the article.

  10. #10
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    Re: Irish Whiskey and Guiness

    Most interesting, I haven't noticed this here (Toronto). I wonder what this is all about? It would surprise me they would change an age-old hallowed recipe.

    Gary

 

 

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