Welcome to the Straightbourbon.com Forums.
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 19
  1. #1
    Enthusiast
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Burlington VT, USA
    Posts
    336

    Scotch... mossy diesel oil?

    Well... I've tried a few pours of scotch here and there in the past, but recently I'd expressed an interest in becoming more familiar with all the different varieties of scotch.

    Because of this, my wife purchased a "Classic Malts of Scotland" sampler for me (6 50ml bottles, from all the different regions).

    I was in the mood for something light, so after reading tasting notes on all of them, I decided I'd try the Dalwhinnie 15 yr old.

    I couldn't get past the second sip. It tasted like diesel oil mixed with moss. Maybe that's the peat flavor? Whatever it was, I used my flask funnel to pour it back into the mini bottle (my wife said she would drink it, just not tonight).

    Now, I'm enjoying a healthy pour of Eagle Rare 101, and marvelling at how good this $16 spirit is when compared to a $50 bottle of Dalwhinnie scotch.

    Maybe I didn't give the Dalwhinnie enough of a chance - I'll be trying some of the other scotches this week.

    I'm worried that I'm kind of slipping into a comfort zone - I've been trying lots of new whiskies (bourbon, Scotch, Irish and Canadian), but I keep falling back on a few "old faithfuls", and they're all bourbons (Eagle Rare SB and Eagle Rare 101, EWSB '94, EC12). Is it possible that I don't like the new things I'm trying because I'm so used to my regular pours?

    Any input would be welcome!

    Thanks,
    Will

  2. #2

    Re: Scotch... mossy diesel oil?

    We all hear you. Personally, I've had some Scotches I like well enough -- Highland Park 12yo Ornkney Islands, Glen Moray (and its parent Glenmorangie), Speysides and Lowlands, in general. I've found Irish whiskey quite palatable over ice (but with an unpleasant aftertaste neat). The Lot 40 Dane brought for Gary Gillman to the Festival was a pleasant Canadian whisky.
    But, I find the variety, depth, flavor and price for bourbons the best bargain in spirits. Thus, I drink it at probably a 10:1 ratio to anything else.

  3. #3
    Enthusiast
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Bristol UK.
    Posts
    272

    Re: Scotch... mossy diesel oil?

    Most find Dalwhinnie 15 a delicate inoffensive Scotch, but it is a little oily and a bit grassy, so I know what you mean. I would not call it peaty though. It's too subtle for my tastes but something I drink in pubs (when off the beer).

    Frankly I would not bother with Scotch for the price you pay. You live in the land of Bourbon. I would celebrate it with a the best whisky in the world

  4. #4
    Connoisseur
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    621

    Re: Scotch... mossy diesel oil?

    Scotch might not be for you. Like Bamber has already touched on, the Dalwhinnie 15 is probably the most approachable drink of the six. You might try the Glenkinchie next, it's a fairly mild lowland.

  5. #5
    Enthusiast
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Chicago
    Posts
    295

    Re: Scotch... mossy diesel oil?

    If you think Dalwhinnie tastes like mossy diesel oil, I can't wait to see what you think of the Lagavulin.

    Try the Lagavulin next. Take a good swig, and let us know your thoughts. (Heh heh.)

  6. #6
    Enthusiast
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Burlington VT, USA
    Posts
    336

    Re: Scotch... mossy diesel oil?

    I've actually had a few sips of Lagavulin before (not even an entire pour - I had some of someone else's). It had a hell of a lot of flavour, but I don't remember it having this same nasty taste that the Dalwhinnie had.

    Maybe Scotch just isn't for me. I'd be a happy man just exploring the various bourbons...

  7. #7
    Bourbonian of the Year 2011
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Toronto, Canada
    Posts
    9,166

    Re: Scotch... mossy diesel oil?

    Dalwhinnie (the regular edition) is a fairly plain whisky in the sense of not being peated very much or showing much effect from sherry cask aging. I think you are seeing the effects of the higher alcohols and other congeners since these are not much modified as I say by peat smoke or other factors. Of course the long aging softens the congeneric effect somewhat but not totally. The mossy effect might be from the water in Dalwhinnie having coursed through peat bogs before distillation (and/or used to dilute the whisky at or after barreling). Or it might reflect effects of the Scottish climate, the atmospheric conditions in the warehouses, that is. Congeners taste the same in my view in all drinks, or rather, they are quite similar showing a kind of metallic, often oily taste and texture. They exist in Bourbon too but are obscured to a degree by red layer sugars and smoky notes from barrel char.

    Gary

  8. #8
    Guru
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Jackson, MS
    Posts
    12,468

    Re: Scotch... mossy diesel oil?

    I like most Scot's whisky except the Island expressions. I think wr has hit on one of the truths underlying the Scotch Whisky industry. Which is to say it had to be blended with netural spirit to to make it palatable to the general market.

    Regards,
    Squire

  9. #9
    Enthusiast
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Burlington VT, USA
    Posts
    336

    Re: Scotch... mossy diesel oil?

    I just want to emphasize that this post was not intended to "slight" Scotch whiskey in any way. Maybe the title of the post was a bit inappropriate, but I went into tasting Scotch with an open mind, and I have had Scotch I liked before... but my first try at a "Classic Malt" was disastrous.

  10. #10
    Advanced Taster
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    144

    Re: Scotch... mossy diesel oil?

    I love American, Scotch and Irish whisk(e)y. They are three completely different drinks, generally, though. It's understandable why someone would like one and not the others.

    I don't knwo anything about Canadian, really, but I'd like to try it.

    However, there's almost as big a variation in Scotch whiskey as there is between any particular scotch brand and American whiskey. Glenmorangie is nothing like Lagavulin, for example - even though they're produced by the same people.

    Anyway, I don't really know what my point is.

 

 

Similar Threads

  1. Scotch in tea
    By JeffRenner in forum Foreign Whiskey
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 06-01-2007, 19:50
  2. Canadian Special Oil
    By mrt in forum Foreign Whiskey
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 03-25-2006, 05:47
  3. Color of Scotch
    By Nightcap in forum Foreign Whiskey
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 11-28-2004, 18:10

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Back to top