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Thread: Why Kentucky?

  1. #21
    Bourbonian of the Year 2002 and Guru
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    Re: Why Kentucky?

    Were they also volumes that appeared to be 5 to 15% less than the barrel's capacity?

    --Chuck Cowdery

  2. #22
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    Re: Why Kentucky?

    While researching a recipe for "rectified bourbon" for a tasting I came across these recipes I would like to share with you all.
    "Old Bourbon Whiskey"
    "Neutral spirit 4 gallons; refined sugar, 3 pounds, dissolved in water, 3 quarts; decoction of tea, 1 pint; 3 drops of oil of wintergreen, dissolved in 1 ounce of alcohol; color with tinciture of cochineal, 2 ounces; burnt sugar, 3 ounces."

    "Monongahela Whiskey"
    Neutral spirit, 4 gallons; honey, 3 pints. dissolved in water, 1 gallon; alcoholic solution of starch, 1 gallon; rum, 1/2 gallon; nitric ether, 1/2 ounce; this is to be colored to suit fancy. Some consumers prefer this whiskey transparent, while others like it just perceptibly tinged with brown; while others, again, want it rather deep, and partaking of red. The novice will find sufficient examples in "Coloring" to guide his fancy."

    These recipes once again prove that Bourbon was an aged product at all times with lots of color whereas rye whiskey was not always aged and sometimes was clear product.

    Mike Veach


  3. #23
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    Re: Why Kentucky?

    That's interesting Mike. Isn't Southern Comfort nothing more than that?

    Linn Spencer

    Have Shotglass. Will Travel.

  4. #24
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    Re: Why Kentucky?

    Good observation Linn. Southern Comfort does use some aged whiskey, but not much.
    Mike Veach


  5. #25
    Bourbonian of the Year 2002 and Guru
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    Re: Why Kentucky?

    Do you have dates for those recipes? It would be good to know when those expectations were dominant.

    --Chuck Cowdery

  6. #26
    Bourbonian of the Year 2002 and Guru
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    Re: Why Kentucky?

    To the best of my knowledge, Southern Comfort contains zero whiskey and makes no claim to contain any. There are a great many sources that say it does, which always amuses the folks at Brown Forman. It is classified as a liqueur and consists of alcohol (GNS), sugar syrup, a flavoring syrup in which apricot concentrate is the principal ingredient, and coloring. Its heritage, though, is exactly that of the old rectified whiskies.

    --Chuck Cowdery

  7. #27
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    Re: Why Kentucky?

    Chuck,
    Circa 1861. I thought I had the date with the bib info, but it was not on that page. I will have to look the next time I am in Bardstown to get the exact date.
    Mike Veach


  8. #28
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    Re: Why Kentucky?

    Chuck,
    Are you sure of this? I thought there was some aged whiskey but it was less than 5%. I could be wrong and I am not sure I remember where I heard that.
    Mike Veach


  9. #29
    Bourbonian of the Year 2002 and Guru
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    Re: Why Kentucky?

    I'm sure. I have it on the best authority.

    --Chuck Cowdery

  10. #30
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    Re: Why Kentucky?

    Friday night I had the interesting experience of tasting the product made from this "bourbon" recipe. There was a lot to be learned from this experience because by looking at what people were doing to imitate bourbon, we can get a better idea as to what bourbon was at the time.

    The first thing I noticed was the color. It was very dark and with a reddish hue. A true "red eye" whiskey. It was so dark that it led me to believe that it was imitating a very old bourbon - over 20 years old. It was darker than any 20 year old bourbon on the market today but that may be because they don't bottle at barrel proof which would make a darker product. (For the record I do have some barrel proof 20yo bourbon and it is darker than they are.)

    The next thing I noticed is the nose with caramel and mint - lots of mint. I have noticed that very old rye recipe bourbons , bourbons of 15 years old or more, often have a mint scent in the nose. That was what they were trying to capture here. The caramel and mint oders are in fine old bourbons so they put these things in their recipe, but at the same time the caramel was not "bourbon caramel" and the mint was not the mint you in an Eagle Rare or some other old bourbon.

    The last thing was the taste. It had bourbon characteristics but it was not bourbon. For the record it reminded me of a product made by U.D. called "Rebel Yell Shooter" which was a cinnamon and bourbon flavored "shooter" drink made in the early 90's when such drinks were the rage of the hour. This product was wintergreen instead of cinnamon, but the same type of flavor - mint with a hint of caramel.

    What I learned is that aging whiskey to 20 years or more must have been common in the 1860's when this book was published. It was common enough to invite immitation.

    Mike Veach


 

 

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