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  1. #81
    Connoisseur
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    Aug 2005
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    NJ, USA
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    834
    I have found all of the Knappogues to be a bit over-hyped. The last bottle of Jameson's 12 I had purchased I didn't care for either. However, I had it in a bar recently and it was fantastic. I must pick up another bottle.
    Tim

    I am going where streams of whiskey are flowing...

  2. #82
    Advanced Taster
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
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    144
    Knappogue Castle is grand, but not brilliant by any means. The 1951 is a different story, though.

  3. #83
    Enthusiast
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    Dec 2001
    Location
    Kansas City metro, US of A
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    430
    I'm seeing a new one locally labeled as Michael Collins Irish on the shelf since St. Pat's. Supposedly from 'Irelands last independant distillery', whoever that may be. No chance to taste it yet, wondered if y'all have run on to it as well.
    Here's to us, who's like us?
    Damned few and they're all dead

  4. #84
    Connoisseur
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    Aug 2005
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    NJ, USA
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    It is from Cooley, I hear the Single Malt is quite nice.
    Tim

    I am going where streams of whiskey are flowing...

  5. #85
    Enthusiast
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    Oct 2004
    Location
    Toronto, Canada
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    402
    Cooley's malts tend to be double-distilled instead of tripple-distilled like most other irish whiskies. Makes for a different flavour element. Not scotch, but far away from the likes of Bushmills IMHO...

  6. #86
    Virtuoso
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    Apr 2005
    Location
    Chicago SW 'burbs
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    1,178
    I haven't tried either of the Collins versions (there's a single malt and a blend). However, I've had Cooley's peated Connemara single malt. If you like Islay Scotches, it's well worth getting a bottle.

    Nowadays, there are three distilleries in Ireland: Cooley (independent), Midleton (Pernod Ricard), and Bushmills (Diageo, in Northern Ireland). Cooley is the newest of the three, established in 1987. Bushmills used to be controlled by Pernod Ricard, which had purchased the Irish Distillers Group - and there was a period of time where IDG had a complete monopoly on Irish whiskey. Jameson's Bow Street distillery is a museum now; the whiskey comes from Midleton.
    Oh no! You have walked into the slavering fangs of a lurking grue!

  7. #87
    Apprentice
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Oxford, U.K.
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    39
    I was recently lucky enough to be taken to Dublin as a guest of pernod-ricard during the aftermath of St Pats. On the first day I finally achieved my guinness wings which I'd been struggling for in the U.K. (we use a differant gas which makes it more bitter) and discovered Midleton's rare on the recommendation of a bar industry illuminate. I can see why they don't ship it to the U.K. if it tastes that good. costs around the same as J.W. Blue though (ouch). Still not really sold on Jamesons as the Irish Distillers prefer to produce whiskey for smoothness (i.e. blandness) and I'm a big Islay fan. I found most Irish whiskeys more akin to a mid range canadian or a Tennessee whiskey although Connemarah (scuse spelling) I also really enjoyed, comparable to Bunnahabin in some respects, though not as chocolatey. I was told later that this was a relatively new distillery designed to fill the gap in the market for a peaty Irish whiskey. (Though not really playing to the rules of Irish style whiskey production).

    Fondest memories will be of drinking my first measure of Midleton to the sound of a traditional Irish 3 piece band in Temple Bar, drinking Powers gold label with dinner at the distillery and dreaming about the 1,200 euro bottle of Midleton in the wooden case in the display cabinet in the Gift shop. Happy Days.

  8. #88
    Enthusiast
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    Oct 2004
    Location
    Toronto, Canada
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    402
    Quote Originally Posted by Paulbrad25
    I found most Irish whiskeys more akin to a mid range canadian or a Tennessee whiskey although Connemarah (scuse spelling) I also really enjoyed, comparable to Bunnahabin in some respects, though not as chocolatey.
    Hi Paulbrad:

    Suprised that you'd compare Conemarra to Bunnahabhain. I've had about 4 expressions of the Buny, and except for one (an IB) they were pretty much bland - and I don't use that term lightly. Conemarra on the other hand I found similar to a med-high peated highland malt with something that...doesn't quite say scotch. Plenty of personality and easy to "get".

  9. #89
    Enthusiast
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    Oct 2004
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    Toronto, Canada
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paulbrad25
    Still not really sold on Jamesons as the Irish Distillers prefer to produce whiskey for smoothness (i.e. blandness) and I'm a big Islay fan. I found most Irish whiskeys more akin to a mid range canadian or a Tennessee whiskey...
    As a description of the Irish whisky tradition, I can't argue with your thoughts here. I would disagree with the mildness = blandness position, but I respect your right to say this. If you like Islay and Bourbon, then Irish Whiskies will be a big step down in terms of general intensity I think. Nothing to rival Ardbeg or Bookers. But it does have its own charms - sounds like you found out about Middleton VR!

  10. #90
    Apprentice
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    Mar 2006
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    Oxford, U.K.
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    39
    Quote Originally Posted by Frodo
    Hi Paulbrad:

    Suprised that you'd compare Conemarra to Bunnahabhain. I've had about 4 expressions of the Buny, and except for one (an IB) they were pretty much bland - and I don't use that term lightly. Conemarra on the other hand I found similar to a med-high peated highland malt with something that...doesn't quite say scotch. Plenty of personality and easy to "get".
    You're probably right, it wasn't exactly a controlled tasting and my palate was all over the place.
    On the sunday we were sat in temple bar and had 11 pints of guinness and 11 measures of whisky (from a selection of over 200) and the most memorable thing about the Bunnahabhain was the taste of dark chocolate (probably enhanced by the chocolatey notes in Irish guinness), removing that and comparing it with the subsequent whiskey may be subject to a little error. I'd agree that the Connemarra was pretty unique and I'll definatley be on the look out for more, though range in Irish whisky has only just become common here since the troubles so I may have to wait awhile.
    Luckily I had the Midleton VR first.

 

 

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