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  1. #1
    **DONOTDELETE**
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    An Interesting Advertisment

    Yes this is Mike even though it is John's computer. I have been in Cincy all weekend doing research at the library. While looking at city directories (the earliest version of telephone books without the telephone numbers) I found a very interesting advertisment from 1858. John is going to help me attach this document so you can examine it for yourselves.

    This advertisement is interesting on many levels. First they talk about "old Bourbon" (refer back to past postings on age and bourbon). Next the distillery is also a mill and at last notice the remarks on the whiskey being "Undrugged" and the "Distilled solely in copper, free from steam, and rectified by fire".

    Examine this and give me some comments.
    Mike Veach

    =John=
    http://w3.one.net/~jeffelle/whiskey
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  2. #2
    The Boss
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    Re: An Interesting Advertisment

    Mike,
    The "undrugged" statement is interesting, and probably put in the copy to distinguish their product from the various opiate laden snake oil elixirs of the day.
    The History Channel has recently been running an excellent miniseries called "Illegal drugs and how they got that way". It was amazing to see how many over-the-counter preparations contained opiates in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

    Cheers,

    Jim Butler
    Straightbourbon.com

  3. #3
    **DONOTDELETE**
    Guest

    Re: An Interesting Advertisment

    Jim,
    John and I also saw an advertisement for "Coca Whiskey" that even used the same style of letters as Coca-Cola except this ad predated Coca-Cola (I think it was 1883 but it may have been 1879. John is the one who found it so he may remember.) This shows that they were putting cocaine in whiskey in the late 19th century.
    Mike Veach


  4. #4
    The Boss
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    Re: An Interesting Advertisment

    Mike,
    Apparently when morphine use became socially and politically unacceptable, these same snake oil companies started to replace morphine with cocaine in their preparations; ostensibly to get people off the junk. Needless to say, that trick didnt work.


    Cheers,

    Jim Butler
    Straightbourbon.com

  5. #5
    Apprentice
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    Re: An Interesting Advertisment

    Hi Mike

    What's also interesting (to me at least) is the mention of pure malt whisky. Today's handful of American single malt whiskies obviously aren't something 'new'!

    Cheers, Lex


  6. #6
    **DONOTDELETE**
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    Re: An Interesting Advertisment

    Lex,
    There are many "Malt Whiskies" to be found in the 19th century. American Malts are not anything new and I suspect that they will die for the same reasons their ancestors did - unable to compete with rye and bourbon.
    Mike Veach


  7. #7
    Apprentice
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    Re: An Interesting Advertisment

    Hi Mike

    How widespread where malt whiskies in 19th century America? Has a comprehensive publication on that ever appeared anywhere? If not, it would be very a very nice article for "Celtic Spirit" ....

    By the way, I'm not so sure that today's American malt whiskies will go extinct as a result of competition with bourbon/rye. In the 19th century, competition was on a much more local scale than now. Whether American malt whiskies will survive in today's global market will to a large part depend, I think, on how they can compete with Scottish/Irish single malts.

    Cheers, Lex


  8. #8
    Bourbonian of the Year 2002 and Guru
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    Re: An Interesting Advertisment

    How widespread where malt whiskies in 19th century America?

    I would like to know that too. My impression is, not very. I just wrote an article in which I pooh pooh Fritz Maytag's contention that 100 percent malt rye whiskey would have been common or typical in the 18th century. Part of my reasoning is that every bourbon recipe we know about, including the one Mike V just found from 1800, calls for 10 to 15 percent malt and cooking the mash to complete the starch-to-sugar conversion. America doesn't have a tradition of all-malt brewing or all-malt whiskey-making, so I doubt it ever did.

    For that matter, how old is all-malt distilling in Scotland, Ireland and Wales? Does it go back to the beginning or is it a relatively recent phenom?

    --Chuck Cowdery

  9. #9
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    Re: An Interesting Advertisment

    For that matter, how old is all-malt distilling in Scotland, Ireland and Wales? Does it go back to the beginning or is it a relatively
    recent phenom?


    Hi Chuck

    Certainly goes back to the beginning. The earliest record of a spirit distilled from grain on Scottish soil specifically mentions 'malt' and dates from 1494. Malted barley as the base material is known through the centuries in Scotland / Ireland (Wales' whisky history is much more obscure). But just as often a mixture of malted and unmalted barley was used (people in the highlands often simply distilled from what they had available). Oats have been used as well, but it seems rye hasn't been used much if at all. There are 18th century records suggesting to replace growing rye instead of barley to reduce the amount of whisky distilled. This suggests to me that rye wasn't used for whisky.

    Cheers, Lex


  10. #10
    **DONOTDELETE**
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    Re: An Interesting Advertisment

    Lex this "old world" connection is intriguing. My family is made up of English, Welsh, and Scotch/Irish Protestents. Why do you suppose that the farmer/distillers of early America discarded barley malts for rye and corn whiskey? Did it have anything to do with; pants, firearms, or large brested Germanic women?

    Linn Spencer

    Have Shotglass. Will Travel.

 

 

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