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  1. #11
    Bourbonian of the Year 2008
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    Feb 2005
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    116
    I wonder where the 2000 barrels of Stitzel Weller Distillate that they own will be used. I would guess in the standard Crown but who knows?
    Randy

  2. #12
    Bourbonian of the Year 2011
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    Sep 2002
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    Toronto, Canada
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    Thanks for this, I remember when that fire occurred. This is a rare example of a special release from a Canadian distiller. For years Seagram/Diageo has contented itself with Crown Royal, Crown Royal Special Reserve and Limited Edition, all good whiskies but not IMO that different from each other (Limited Edition seems more rye-like to a degree). Hiram Walker puts out variations on a theme such as the different age expressions of Canadian Club. There was also the CC Sherry Cask, Gooderham & Worts and Pike's Creek releases (now seemingly defunct) but these were not IMO that different in character from regular Canadian whisky. To my knowledge, neither of these two major players has released a straight whiskey in Canada in over 50 years with the possible exception of Lot 40 which unfortunately, again IMO, is not that great-tasting neat (I use it to advantage in blending though).

    I know Koji toured some of our Canadian distilleries recently. Koji, did you get any insights on whether Canadian distillers (especially Hiram Walker) are planning to release any straight-type whisky? Did you get to taste any such products when doing the tours by which I mean products made in-house to flavor largely neutral spirits? If so what do they taste like?

    I mentioned earlier in the thread other recent new releases, e.g., Danfield's Private Reserve. This group (3 or 4 in total) were the first new brands or extensions I had seen in some time. Again except to a degree for the Wiser's I mentioned I find them not all that different from the standard Canadian whisky type. But I recognise too, "it is what it is". It isn't fair to say that something should be turned into its opposite. Even with reduced market share the Canadians have done very well with Canadian whisky, so probably they don't see any real incentive to innovate. Who would they take share away from..? Scotch drinkers, maybe, but that is not a huge market here, not the single malt part of it and I doubt they would take away much share from the blends. They won't take away share from the vodka drinkers, or bourbon drinkers (not enough of them). Also, all the big Canadian distilleries are internationally owned now. The impetus to create or revive a truly local product does not I think arise in the same way as when a factory is locally owned. E.g. it took Forty Creek, which is locally owned, to do something new in Canadian whisky by releasing Barrel Select and 3 Grain.

    Gary
    Last edited by Gillman; 05-15-2006 at 13:10.

  3. #13
    Guru
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Central Arizona (near Prescott), U.S.A.
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    4,235
    Dang it, Chuck!

    The description of the Crown Royal XR had my mouth watering. It reminded me of the few drinks of CR I had as a poor Airman Second Class back in the early 60's, when I presume it was a much different product than today.

    However, upon seeing the price my mouth dried quickly.

    Yours truly,
    Dave Morefield
    Yours truly,
    Dave Morefield

    Dog Lover, Euphonium Player, Campfire Guitarist, Marksman,

  4. #14
    Bourbonian of the Year 2011
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    Sep 2002
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    9,044
    Crown Royal was indeed very good back then. It used to have whiskies as old as 30 years in it. The brand was created in 1939 so in the 60's it would have incorporated whiskies distilled during the Second World War. Crown Royal is still pretty good though. You can improve it, in my view, by adding dashes of aged whiskeys such as, say Hirsch 16 and other aged whiskeys many of us have (ORVW 13 year old, or Kentucky XO). You won't get it exactly like it was then but it may end up very good and maybe better. I do this in the glass. E.g. if I had some CR now I might pour 3 ounces and add a dash of ORVW 13 year old and maybe some older bourbon of some kind (EC 18 maybe). I might add another aged Canadian whisky too. You can make minor adjustments that might produce the kind of blend the master blenders at Seagram used to produce.

    Sam Bronfman of Seagram said, "Distilling is a science, blending an art". Never were truer words spoken.

    Gary
    Last edited by Gillman; 05-15-2006 at 13:31.

 

 

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