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Thread: Manhattan's

  1. #1
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    Manhattan's

    Does anyone have a great recipe for a Manhattan?

    Also any bourbon recommendations to put in them?

    Thank so much.

    Tim

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by TimmyBoston
    Does anyone have a great recipe for a Manhattan?

    Also any bourbon recommendations to put in them?

    Thank so much.

    Tim

    Here is a previous thread on the topic. http://www.straightbourbon.com/forum...ight=Manhattan
    Bourbon makes me happy.

    Go Fighters!

  3. #3
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    I took a look at the previous thread and think I will revise my answer a little. For one thing, I seldom garnish the drink anymore (i.e., no cherry) and don't miss it.

    I do find that, if I feel like a manhattan, my hand goes immediately for the Rittenhouse Rye bottled-in-bond. If a bourbon, Very Old Barton BIB. Because of the sweetness of the vermouth, I tend not to like wheated bourbons for a manhattan.

    If I'm feeling lazy, I'll make it on-the-rocks, but I really prefer them mixed in a shaker or pitcher (Shaken v. stirred? Either is fine.) and strained into a chilled glass.

    Proportions, I usually free pour, but it's probably 3:1 or 4:1.

    Bitters? Yes, and usually five or six shakes instead of the customary one or two.

    I think I may go make one right now.

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by cowdery
    ...if I feel like a manhattan, my hand goes immediately for the Rittenhouse Rye bottled-in-bond...
    I'll second that -- at least, so far as to affirm that I much prefer a straight rye (I used most of a bottle of 2004 Saz 18yo -- which I found very one-dimensional -- in Manhattans). Almost any bourbon is too 'sweet' to match with the vermouth.
    Tim

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by TNbourbon
    Almost any bourbon is too 'sweet' to match with the vermouth.
    I much agree Tim and therefore use Canadian Whiskey to make mine.
    Joe
    Colonel Joseph B. "Bourbon Joe" Koch

    "Bourbon.....It's cheaper than therapy!!"

  6. #6
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    Well we have a spectrum of Manhattan flavors. Canadian whisky makes (to my taste) a light Manhattan, where the whiskey taste is subtle. Wheat-recipe bourbon makes a mild-tasting Manhattan and some find it hasn't enough edge; this is due to absence of rye small grains. A rye-recipe bourbon Manhattan makes an acceptable drink, tending to very good, depending on the type of bourbon. A straight rye whiskey makes the least sweet Manhattan in the sense that the rye spiciness adds complexity and interest to the drink. I like Manhattans best either with straight rye only or a blend of all the whiskies I have mentioned plus JD for good measure. The blending, which always has a good splash of Lot 40 in it (which is very rye-e), just makes for a complex, rich, balanced flavor once the vermouth is added. Sometimes if the result is too "much" I'll add some good soft vodka to make the taste less intense (or say, Black Velvet). I have a Sazerac mixture now made from 20 whiskies of the types mentioned, some vodka (maybe 15%), maple syrup and brown sugar, absinthe and two kinds of bitters. It is (need I say) very good.

    Gary
    Last edited by Gillman; 05-28-2006 at 11:27.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by cowdery

    If I'm feeling lazy, I'll make it on-the-rocks, but I really prefer them mixed in a shaker or pitcher (Shaken v. stirred? Either is fine.) and strained into a chilled glass.
    I agree about the shaker Chuck. I have no real experience with mixing cocktails other than Gin and Tonics, Rum & Cokes, screwdrivers or a margarita(with the pre bottle mix, of course). So when I started trying Whiskey cocktails, I had a hell of a time......

    I first started making Sazeracs and Manhattans by simply mixing them (stirring) in a single glass I was not very happy with the outcome. Flavors seems way off and didn't seem to compliment each other.

    I then tried it in a shaker. WOW totally different and good.

    These 2 whiskey cocktails are comprised of ingredients(bitters, herbsaint, vermouth) each of which, has a very strong and distinct impact and this impact can be throw off but a slight miscalculation in the amounts of any one and/or not mixing well. Thess are not "beginner" cocktails and someone who can make a great one, truly has learned a skill.

    If you don't have experience with making cocktails like I did, I would recommend using a shaker to make them.
    "That rug really tied the room together" -- Jeffery Lebowski

  8. #8
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    I learned to make Manhattans on the rocks, mixing in the glass. Yesterday, I found a couple of what I call Manhattan glasses (like a martini glass, but with a stouter stem, so I don't spill it all), and used a shaker to mix a manhattan. I'm never going back. For the record, I used Old Overolt in this one. After experimenting, I stick with straight rye in my manhattans, though I need to grab a bottle of Canadian (Forty Creek?) to give that a whirl.
    -Sam

  9. #9
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    All this discusssion reminded my to re-try a variant that I haven't had for a while... It's a "Wry Manhattan"... made with rye (I use Saz) and Southern Comfort in place of the sweet vermouth. You may have to adjust the bitters component some.

    I first had this at the Cowboy Ciao Restaurant in Scottsdale, Az. It's an interesting variant on the old classic.
    John B

    "Drinking when we are not thirsty and making love at all seasons… that is all there is to distinguish us from other animals."

  10. #10
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    I'm on my second Manhattan tonight... the first was with Rittenhouse BIB, and the current one with WT101. Both of these make superb Manhattans, and are inexpensive enough that I don't regret mixing them, even though they are quite good neat.

    Tonight, I'm taking a different approach to the bitters - instead of using Angostura, I shook in a few dashes each of Peychaud's and of Regan's Orange Bitters.

    Absolutely sublime, whether with Rittenhouse or with WT101. A wonderful drink for a warm evening on the front porch, with the lightning bugs making their first appearance of the year, and the sounds of a downtown Saturday night concert with a good local rock band clearly audible.

    I was tempted to go further in the Sazerac direction with a dash of Herbsaint, but decided against it. Maybe next time. Peychaud's + Regan's is my usual bitters combo for Sazeracs...

    As I have always done, I use a cherry and a teaspoon of the cherry syrup, and my whiskey/vermouth mix is 3 oz/1 oz , with Martini & Rossi red.
    Oh no! You have walked into the slavering fangs of a lurking grue!

 

 

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