Welcome to the Straightbourbon.com Forums.
Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 40
  1. #21
    Guru
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Pelham, AL
    Posts
    3,882

    Post

    I think there may be a very few states that you could do it in, but I strongly doubt that Kentucky is one of them. The micro distilleries I have heard about are in California or Oregon.

    Tim
    Self-Styled Whisky Connoisseur

  2. #22
    Bourbonian of the Year 2010 and Guru
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Kentucky!
    Posts
    4,745
    This is a question I'm sure many of us on this board have asked ourselves.

    Basically any place it is legal to distil, you could do this (basically this would exclude dry counties that don't have a distilling history). However, yes the AFT will be involved. Your property has to be zoned commercial or industial (depending on local regs). You better either be a tax attorney or be prepared to hire one(or ten) full time, as the tax codes for distillers are miles long. Fritz Maytag said during a lecture that the ATF was very helpful, in getting all the appropriate paperwork filled out, and such. I would think one of the biggest hurdles would be getting it to meet up with the OSHA rules, after all a distillery is like running a bomb.
    2010 Bourbonian of the Year

    As long as you have good whiskey you're not "unemployed", you're "Funemployed!!!"

    I'm no Pappyophile

  3. #23
    Bourbonian of the Year 2002 and Guru
    Join Date
    Sep 1999
    Location
    Chicago
    Posts
    12,375
    There is federal licensing involved and state regs too, though the state regs have mostly to do with how you market your product. It's not as hard as it used to be and not as hard as you might think. Although not directly relevant, the feds recently have made it very easy to get a license to make fuel ethanol, which is virtually the same thing. The biggest drawbacks are not the initial licensing but the ongoing regulatory compliance requirements and the taxes. You owe taxes to the feds on everything you make and taxes to the state on everything you have in storage (a form of property tax).

    In other words, even if you start very small, it can be very expensive. Also, one thing most people don't realize, is that distilling is a 24-hour-a-day operation. You can't distill 9-to-5. That makes it very hard for one person to do alone.

    In addition to California and Oregon, where they mostly are associated with wineries, I know of micro-distilleries in Michigan, Indiana, Ohio, Colorado, New York, Maine and North Carolina. I'm sure there are others. I received an inquiry just yesterday from someone who is planning to start one in Wisconsin.

    I don't know of any in Kentucky. I can't say if Kentucky has hurdles that are higher than any other place. Certainly Kentucky government generally and certain counties specifically are very supportive of the macro industry, which provides a lot of jobs and tax revenues.

    There is now even a nascent trade association for the micro-distilling movement, founded by Bill Owens, one of the fathers of the micro-brewing movement all those many years ago. They have an email newsletter, a print journal and a web site.

    Have fun and keep us posted.
    Last edited by cowdery; 09-18-2006 at 15:16.

  4. #24
    Connoisseur
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Northwest Indiana
    Posts
    693
    I understand about the enormous taxes, and as far a s marketing goes, I'm not sure I would even be interested in selling any. I realize that distilling is 24 hours, but I am talking maybe 20-40 barrels a year, just playin around. I am still really interested in this, and I think that one advantage I have over most people on the site is age, well lack there of anyway. Even if it took me a few years to setup, I still have lots of time in my corner. I think that I could make it work, I guess I just need to start finding paperwork and dive in.

    Chuck - Holy crap. Now THAT is a great website. Thanks.

  5. #25
    Bourbonian of the Year 2010 and Guru
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Kentucky!
    Posts
    4,745
    Home poduction of spirits is still currently illegal. Only beer and wine may be made for personal consumption. If you want to run a still you MUST market it for sale.
    2010 Bourbonian of the Year

    As long as you have good whiskey you're not "unemployed", you're "Funemployed!!!"

    I'm no Pappyophile

  6. #26
    Bourbonian of the Year 2002 and Guru
    Join Date
    Sep 1999
    Location
    Chicago
    Posts
    12,375
    Quote Originally Posted by barturtle
    Home poduction of spirits is still currently illegal. Only beer and wine may be made for personal consumption. If you want to run a still you MUST market it for sale.
    Not really true. You simply have to comply with all of the same regulatory and taxation requirements that a commercial operation is subject to, but no one cares if you actually sell anything. This is not the case for beer and wine production. You may make wine or beer for personal consumption without even telling the government about it, so long as you don't sell the stuff. The different regimen for spirits doesn't mean you have to sell your product, it just means you have to comply with all the same rules as people who do.

    From a reality-check standpoint, a person interested in doing this, even on a very small scale for personal enjoyment, will need a lot of money. It's a very expensive hobby.

  7. #27
    Administrator in exile
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Posts
    3,904
    Quote Originally Posted by barturtle
    Home poduction of spirits is still currently illegal. Only beer and wine may be made for personal consumption. If you want to run a still you MUST market it for sale.
    Or you could move to New Zealand, which I believe is one of the few places in the WORLD that personal distilling is legal.

    See:http://www.homedistiller.org for some good information from New Zeland on home distillation.
    Last edited by jeff; 09-18-2006 at 15:55.
    Simplicity is the essence of universality - MK Ghandi

  8. #28
    Connoisseur
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Northwest Indiana
    Posts
    693

  9. #29
    Bourbonian of the Year 2010 and Guru
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Kentucky!
    Posts
    4,745
    True Chuck, I was just checking this myself. The ATF site refers to this as making it impractical to do for personal use.

    Here's the link you need, if you wanna read all the regs you would need to follow:
    http://www.atf.treas.gov/alcohol/inf...genalcohol.htm
    2010 Bourbonian of the Year

    As long as you have good whiskey you're not "unemployed", you're "Funemployed!!!"

    I'm no Pappyophile

  10. #30
    Enthusiast
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Chicago
    Posts
    295
    I believe that one of the requirements for getting a permit for a distillery is that the operation be commercially viable. I suppose that is different from actually selling anything, but it does mean that the operation should (in theory) be capable of producing spirits for sale economically. Of course, ATF no doubt has its own interpretation of what that phrase in the regs means.

 

 

Similar Threads

  1. A couple of finds today
    By CrispyCritter in forum General Bourbon Discussion
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 08-13-2005, 06:42
  2. Going to Louisville in a couple of weeks
    By RedVette in forum General Bourbon Discussion
    Replies: 18
    Last Post: 03-13-2005, 14:38
  3. Couple of Canadians
    By Gillman in forum Foreign Whiskey
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 12-23-2004, 11:38

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Back to top