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  1. #1
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    25-30 Year Old Bourbon in Japan

    Anyone have any idea of what the market for single barrel 25 to 30 year old bourbon is selling for in Japan?


  2. #2
    The Boss
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    Re: 25-30 Year Old Bourbon in Japan

    gunner,
    By "25-30 year old", do you mean the bourbon was in the barrel for that period of time, or do you mean that the bourbon is x years old, and was bottled [25,30] - x years ago?

    Cheers,

    Jim Butler
    Straightbourbon.com

  3. #3
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    Re: 25-30 Year Old Bourbon in Japan

    Bourbon that was laid down 25 to 30 years ago, bottled in the past year with a proof of 107. This is a single barrel product.

    Thanks for your input.


  4. #4
    **DONOTDELETE**
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    Re: 25-30 Year Old Bourbon in Japan

    Gunner does this bourbon have a name? If this is a rye recipe bourbon it is very likely to horrid indeed.

    Linn Spencer

    Have Shotglass. Will Travel.

  5. #5
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    Re: 25-30 Year Old Bourbon in Japan

    I'd say the horrid notion is open for debate. I'd certainly like to taste it before I made that judgement. Single barrel bourbon in that age range sounds intriguing in any event.

    gunnerisac, where will you be come festival time?


    Cheers,

    Jim Butler
    Straightbourbon.com

  6. #6
    **DONOTDELETE**
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    Re: 25-30 Year Old Bourbon in Japan

    Good! Let's discuss really long in the barrel bourbons. I've tried the old 23 year old rye recipe Pappy Van Winkle. Absolutely horrible! If it were not for Maker's Mark this would easily quailfy as the worst bourbon on the planet!

    18 year old Elijah Craig Single Barrel -- TTTTTTTTTTTTerrible Stuff!!!!!! I made the mistake of buying a bottle one time and I'll never do it again.

    Granted there are slowly maturing barrels. In these instances age makes little difference.

    When a barrel is ready it's ready and not a day longer will make any positive difference. Indeed additional aging will only be detrimental as the bourbon becomes too wooden.

    This is why Jimmy Russell states that ten years in the wood is optimal for the Wild Turkey recipe. Baker Beam states that 8 years optimal for his 'Bakers' bourbon. Nine years seems to be the optimal time period for Knob Creek. 12 years tastes great to me in Heaven Hill's regular bottling of Elijah Craig, and ten years is aplenty for their Evan Williams Single Barrel.

    Don't be taken in by these extra aged bottlings. You're only paying extra money for a lessor bourbon. This is my somewhat limited experience.

    Linn Spencer

    Have Shotglass. Will Travel.

  7. #7
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    Re: 25-30 Year Old Bourbon in Japan

    Linn,
    I find your melange of syllogism and subjectivity intriguing as well, but I'm not ready to summarily dismiss you merely because I feel you've been in the barrel too long ;-)

    I happen to like EC 18 quite a bit, though perhaps not as much as the 12YO; yet I don't detect the oakiness in it that I would describe as oppressive in the WT Russell's Reserve. I think Weller 19 and Hirsch 20 are both superb bourbons as well, though I'd probably like them even if they hadnt been in the wood so long.

    As I said, I'd like to taste a 30 year old bourbon. Worst case scenario? I spit it out, say a few nasty words on the side, and move on to something tastier, increasing my knowledge in the process.

    Cheers,

    Jim Butler
    Straightbourbon.com

  8. #8
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    Re: 25-30 Year Old Bourbon in Japan

    Gentlemen,

    For what it's worth from a beginner, I wonder if at greater age the characteristics of the barrel itself become increasingly dominant in the profile of the bourbon. For example, I've tasted 16 yr. old Hirsch and 17 yr. old Eagle Rare, which are both less oaky than 10 YO Russell's Reserve, and far less oaky than WT 12 YO. Probably the char level is part of this, and I have speculated in the past on the effect of location, pollution, water, soil, etc. on the taste of oak staves, not to mention the aging process of oak billets which are destined for cooperage use. We know the effect of location and soil on wine grapes, so why shouldn't stalwart old Quercus Alba, who, after all has to steep much longer in the growing environment before being harvested, also be affected by his surroundings? Therefore, I would think that a brief description of the oak itself (perhaps a rough statement of the relative intensity of tannin and sugar in the uncharred staves) could be a fascinating addition to the label information on a high-end single-barrel bottling.

    Ralph Wilps


  9. #9
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    Re: 25-30 Year Old Bourbon in Japan

    Gunner
    Welcome to the forum! for what its worth i have to agree with Jim, and also Ralph has hit on a very intriquing question or statement. this english/native-american wishes he could afford some of these aged preferably wheated bourbons aged in some of the finest oak barrels for however long they need to be aged to become pure ambrosia. Life is Good--Den
    sorry i forgot your question, i would guess approximately 2 to 3 times as much as here in U.S. but like i said that is just a guess.
    <P ID="edit"><FONT SIZE=-1>Edited by vasshopper on Mon Aug 27 18:28:07 2001 (server time).</FONT></P>

  10. #10
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    Re: 25-30 Year Old Bourbon in Japan

    Just wanted to throw my two cents in concerning older bourbons. I just finished taste testing our new release of Eagle Rare 17, Sazerac Rye 18, and Weller 19. We had to disgard a few barrels because they were terrible. As you know, to be a bourbon, barrel entry proof can not exceed 125 proof. One of the barrels we tasted came out of the barrel at 162 proof! I know that as bourbon ages, both water and alcohol are lost, the result being an increase in the proofage. But this much of an increase far exceeds anything any of our warehousemen have ever seen. Even Gary is stumped by this. Anyway, the bottom line is that some whiskies start acquiring a woody taste before they are ten years old, others age better. Warehouse location, barrel selection, entry proof(?), and who knows what other factors conspire to help some whiskies age gracefully.

    Ken


 

 

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