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  1. #11
    Connoisseur
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    651
    Mine is the one without the 7 year expression. I'm thinking yours would taste a little better. Mine is not god-aweful. Not a top shelf.
    Mark/Nebraska


    Life is not measured by the number of breaths you take... but by the moments that take your breath away. 11/25/2004

  2. #12
    Bourbonian of the Year 2002 and Guru
    Join Date
    Sep 1999
    Location
    Chicago
    Posts
    12,657
    We learned from a recent experience with Rittenhouse that mislabeling happens. We have to assume it's accidental, who will admit otherwise? I'd hate to think Luxco (formerly David Sherman) is knowingly claiming that whiskey distilled at Bernheim was distilled at Stitzel-Weller. Let's just hope they're using up some old labels or something.

    As for what's so great about Stitzel-Weller whiskey, well, it's just really good, tasty, well-made whiskey, distinctive, and when the last of it is gone I will miss it. But my life will go on and I will drink again.

    Part of it is the wheat recipe. We know Stitzel-Weller made wheated bourbon before Maker's Mark did. We assume someone made wheated bourbon before Stitzel-Weller did, but we don't know that for sure because we don't know who it may have been.

    The best source we have who is willing to venture an opinion as to where the wheat recipe used by Stitzel-Weller originated is Sally Van Winkle Campbell and she says it originated with the Stitzel family.

    Dave Pickerell, of Maker's Mark, says the Stitzel-Weller still was unique, at least it was until Maker's Mark copied it.

    Really good whiskey is mostly a product of kismet. Many things have to fall into place and, seemingly, they all did at Stitzel-Weller.

    The point of this ramble is that Stitzel-Weller whiskey is very good and every whiskey lover should try to drink some before it's all gone, but there was exceptional whiskey before Stitzel-Weller and there is other exceptional whiskey available now. I love Stitzel-Weller whiskey as much as the next guy, but I don't want people who are coming to the party now to feel like they got here just as somebody ate the last shrimp.

  3. #13
    Connoisseur
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    651
    Wow Chuck, so awfully glad to hear you make that last statement. There are so many exciting offerings coming out. In my mind, it's an exciting time to be discovering bourbon and rye whiskys. I have a deep respect for the offerings and efforts that laid the ground work and I am appreciative when I get a sip of history.

    Truth is, we're in the here and now, and the here and now isn't all that bad, I'd even say excellent. The biggest smile on my face at Bardstown was at the 4 Roses breakfast. I asked Jim Rutledge if in about 2010 or so if we could expect a 12yo or 15yo Four Roses offering (I expected a nudge). What I got was an honest answer with a VERY big smile. "I'm already working on that." He may well be the happiest guy in Bardstown right now and rightfully so.

    SW is so special because the time was right, the conditions, the people, but that is still going on today in many places with many people, you just have to use your taste buds and ignore the price.
    Mark/Nebraska


    Life is not measured by the number of breaths you take... but by the moments that take your breath away. 11/25/2004

  4. #14
    Bourbonian of the Year 2002 and Guru
    Join Date
    Sep 1999
    Location
    Chicago
    Posts
    12,657
    The Golden Age of American Whiskey?

    It's right now. And by becoming knowledgeable and seeking out and buying the best of what is available now, everyone here is helping to make it happen.

  5. #15
    Virtuoso
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Chicago SW 'burbs
    Posts
    1,178
    Needless to say, I completely missed out on the bourbons of the 1960s and 70s - and even the 80s and 90s, as I didn't really get into spirits until '99. Not only that, but I fell into the single-malt snobbery trap early on, and didn't take bourbon seriously untill a few years ago. That's not to knock SMS, though - but now it's just one good choice among many.

    Although I've had some S-W (ORVW 15 comes to mind), the golden age is now, for me. As much as I've loved what little S-W I've tasted, I'd give BT the nod for "here and now" products (other than Rittenhouse BIB and Wild Turkey).
    Oh no! You have walked into the slavering fangs of a lurking grue!

  6. #16
    Guru
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Moscow Mills, MO
    Posts
    2,507
    I started drinking DN 1843 in the late 70s when it was still made at SW and it was a fine bourbon then. But it came in the tall thin bottle back then. A couple of years ago, I found a couple of old Liter bottles in the old style and picked them up for some SB.com folks at the Gazebo. Quite possibly those were still SW so if you do happen to see some of them, they might be worth picking up. I also have some problem with the current iteration as I find it nothing like I remembered it back then. But I wouldn't call it bad bourbon, just standard fare.
    Dane
    I don't drink to excess. But I'll drink to most anything else.

 

 

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