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  1. #11
    Connoisseur
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Northern California
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    681
    My dream bourbon, that does not exist, would be a circa 1950's bottle of VOF 12 y.o. unfiltered, barrel strength. It would be incredible to be able to play with such a bourbon at barrel strength.

    Beyond that, my tastes have moved more towards Rye, probably for the reason that you mention Gary, that the older bourbons seemed to be fruitier compared to today. Today I get a lot more "heat", which is probably due to the younger wood.


    I would basically want a low entry proof, very old wood barrel. Probably a straight rye, or a heavily ryed bourbon. aged about 12 years. I guess that pretty much is a Wild Turkey 12 y.o. gold foil.

    I do wish WT would start to offer some more high end offerings.....I think they could really make some exceptional specialty bourbons. The Rare Breed WT-03 (i think that's the current one) is awesome. Considering it's high proof and flavor profile, it an amazing purchase to what? mid $30??
    "That rug really tied the room together" -- Jeffery Lebowski

  2. #12
    Connoisseur
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    681
    Quote Originally Posted by cowdery
    The thing I would do, while admirable on one level, is despicable on another. I would insist on barrels made from trees that are at least 250 years old.
    Well it wouldn't be so bad if the barrels could be re-used. Beyond the rule that states that to be called bourbon, the barrels have to be new, how many times could an old barrel be reused, do you figure?

    You couldn't call it bourbon after the first go round, but it sure as hell would still be good whiskey.
    "That rug really tied the room together" -- Jeffery Lebowski

  3. #13
    Bourbonian of the Year 2011
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Toronto, Canada
    Posts
    8,980
    Good point, the old wood would "keep going", for a time anyway.

    My understanding is barrels are re-used many times in Scotland and Ireland to age whisk(e)y, sometimes extending over a 50 year period or more.

    Based on tasting older whiskeys, I think the use of older trees then to fashion barrels resulted in a deeper, more spearmint-like taste from the wood, more of the wood gums got in and they had a different taste than younger wood.

    Since wood contributes so much to a whiskey, using a very old tree for barrel-making would impact the flavor quite a bit.

    Today, the barrel wood sometimes tastes of "new fresh wood".

    Gary

  4. #14
    Enthusiast
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Nashville, Tn
    Posts
    358
    [QUOTE=NorCalBoozer]Well it wouldn't be so bad if the barrels could be re-used. Beyond the rule that states that to be called bourbon, the barrels have to be new, how many times could an old barrel be reused, do you figure?

    Years. Until they literally fall apart, ala Scotch.

  5. #15
    Advanced Taster
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    144
    In Ireland, they mainly use first and second fill barrels. They rarely (or maybe never) use more than third fill.

    Some Scottish distillers use older barrels, particularly in blends.

 

 

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