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  1. #21
    Bourbonian of the Year 2011
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    Sep 2002
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    Toronto, Canada
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    9,122

    Re: Cincinnati Chili

    Well, I'm not a maven but I can now say Cincinnati chili is not a stranger.

    I had it from Goldstar, one of the chains in the Cincinnati area.

    I had it on the pasta without onions and beans. I used cheese but on the side, essentially as a condiment. I could see that people just mix it in but it seemed like too much.

    I thought it was great, it was digestible and very tasty. The sauce had all the Greek/Near Eastern spices I'd read about such as cinnamon, oregano or basil, etc. It was lightly spicy (in heat) and did not need the hot sauce sachets that came with it although I used one.

    I also ordered one of their hot dogs, these are little short ones and for this I piled on everything. Again: superb.

    I thought I detected some lamb in the meat sauce. The sauce was medium thick, just perfect.

    I was with others and $20 covered three chilis (two with everything) and 4 of those hot dogs. Now that's a good deal. I was very pleased with this local specialty and will revisit it at some point. I'd like to try Skyline's version which some people I met swore by.

    Gary

    P.S. In the end bourbon did not accompany this food, just good old water and that was fine. The bourbon came later.

  2. #22
    Novice
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    1

    Re: Cincinnati Chili

    Quote Originally Posted by Gillman View Post
    Well, I'm not a maven but I can now say Cincinnati chili is not a stranger.

    I had it from Goldstar, one of the chains in the Cincinnati area.

    I had it on the pasta without onions and beans. I used cheese but on the side, essentially as a condiment. I could see that people just mix it in but it seemed like too much.

    I thought it was great, it was digestible and very tasty. The sauce had all the Greek/Near Eastern spices I'd read about such as cinnamon, oregano or basil, etc. It was lightly spicy (in heat) and did not need the hot sauce sachets that came with it although I used one.

    I also ordered one of their hot dogs, these are little short ones and for this I piled on everything. Again: superb.

    I thought I detected some lamb in the meat sauce. The sauce was medium thick, just perfect.

    I was with others and $20 covered three chilis (two with everything) and 4 of those hot dogs. Now that's a good deal. I was very pleased with this local specialty and will revisit it at some point. I'd like to try Skyline's version which some people I met swore by.

    Gary

    P.S. In the end bourbon did not accompany this food, just good old water and that was fine. The bourbon came later.

    Living in the Cincy area (one of those northern KY guys) - it's a personal thing, Goldstar vs Skyline - I like both, depends on the day and who's driving as to which one I'll eat. Cheese on the side though ....? Cheese coney's are great, get a coney crate and a 12 pack, set for 2 or 3 meals. Agree probably not best with bourbon.

    Next time you're in town, let me know - I can help you navigate that bridge with or without shoes.

    PS - maisonette is now closed as well.

  3. #23
    Bourbonian of the Year 2011
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    Sep 2002
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    9,122

    Re: Cincinnati Chili

    Thanks and it's dishes like this that lend character and colour to the regional parts of the U.S. (which is all parts, really).

    Now who can tell me aboput ciopinno (sp.?), the Bay Area specialty. Is that still made, where is a good place to get it?

    Speaking of Bay Area and environs, thanks Jim for the cool snow flakes appearing as you open the SB site. But how come they ain't bourbon-brown?

    Gary

  4. #24
    Bourbonian of the Year 2011
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    Sep 2002
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    Toronto, Canada
    Posts
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    Re: Cincinnati Chili

    Thanks and it's dishes like this that lend character and colour to the regional parts of the U.S. (which is all parts, really).

    Now who can tell me about ciopinno (sp.?), the Bay Area fish soup specialty. Is that still made, where is a good place to get it?

    Speaking of Bay Area and environs, thanks Jim for the cool snow flakes appearing as you open the SB site. But how come they ain't bourbon-brown?

    Gary

  5. #25
    Advanced Taster
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Montgomery County, Md.
    Posts
    120

    Re: Cincinnati Chili

    Since I keep kosher I can't enjoy C-Chili the way most people can, but nonetheless it is the basis for my favorite chili recipe. I used the recipe in one of The Frugal Gourmet books, use all-beef or 2/3 beef 1/3 turkey, and cut the amount of vinegar in half. As I'm partial to beans, I add half-black and half-kidney beans and cook everything until the beans are very tender.

    Sometimes I'll add a shot of bourbon, but not too much - the bourbon is just to enhance the aroma of spiciness.

    I serve my chili over spaghetti and prefer to wash it down with lager. It makes for a most satisfying meal.
    Last edited by Solomon2; 01-18-2007 at 03:28.

  6. #26
    Bourbonian of the Year 2011
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    Re: Cincinnati Chili

    The dish is one of those that suit different types of preparations and ways of eating it. I leave out cheese more to save calories (not that these stratagems seem to work much..).

    I don't know if I mentioned this earlier, but I thought one of the commercial brands I tried in Cincinnati had some lamb in it.

    The people I was with insisted only beef was used but it had a lamb taste to me (partly), which is fine because I like that taste.

    This is really an excellent dish in my view. So many American (and Canadian) regional dishes are good if made right and freshly cooked. Sometimes new dishes are created (Buffalo wings, late 1960's; Philly steaks and later cheese steaks (from 1930's on)). Some are very old, e.g., chili (traditional style). I want to try one of those tenderloin sandwiches I've read about you can get in the Mid-west.

    Gary

  7. #27
    Bourbonian of the Year 2002 and Guru
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    Sep 1999
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    Chicago
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    12,617

    Re: Cincinnati Chili

    Quote Originally Posted by Gillman View Post
    I want to try one of those tenderloin sandwiches I've read about you can get in the Mid-west.
    I grew up with these, not knowing they were anything special and, in my opinion, they aren't. Think wiener shnitzel on a bun.

  8. #28
    Taster
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    Dec 2004
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    lounging in south central PA
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    76

    Re: Cincinnati Chili

    I only lived in Cincinnati for a brief time (6 mos.) but fell in love with the city and never pass an opportunity to visit. Vine street has some nice music venues and record shops. But Skyline chili is a godsend. I love it on a dog piled high with shredded cheese and a splash of their own hot sauce. I was pleasantly surprised to find one in Loiusville. And walking across that bridge into KY is kinda funny in that the first thing you notice is the large neon signs simply advertising "Whisky!"
    More whiskey. Less complaining. - Overheard at SXSW music festival.

  9. #29
    Guru
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    Nov 2006
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    Northwest of Peoria
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    4,437

    Re: Cincinnati Chili

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Gillman
    I want to try one of those tenderloin sandwiches I've read about you can get in the Mid-west.


    Quote Originally Posted by cowdery View Post
    I grew up with these, not knowing they were anything special and, in my opinion, they aren't. Think wiener shnitzel on a bun.
    I don't know what a wiener shnitzel is but I can testify to the fact tenderloin sandwiches are nothing to write home about. It's hard to believe they are actually made from the tenderloin because they are not tender. They're beaten very flat with a tenderizing mallet, usually breaded, deep fat fried and served on a bun.

    A hundred times better is butterfly pork chop sandwich. Especially when cooked outside on a grill. (outdoor festivals and such)

    For something Midwestern try a made-rite; a loose hamburger sandwich made with "made-rite sauce" served on a bun. Moist, greasy, messy and very tasty. We have "made-rite" restaurants, it's their signature item.

  10. #30
    Bourbonian of the Year 2004 and Guru
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
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    Nelson County, Kentucky
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    2,735

    Re: Cincinnati Chili

    I was raised in a large family. We had a huge garden...Seemed as if it were 10 acres I spent a lot of time in the garden during the summer breaks, of my youth...It seemed as if the rest of my free time was spent canning tomatoes, snappin' green beans, and shuckin' corn. I swore that when, "I got big", I ain't never gonna have a garden...I'll buy this stuff...

    I kept true to the promise...I hate gardening...always have and guess I always will.

    Anyway, back to th original post. We always killed hogs the first cold weekend in November...The best part (really there isn't) was on the first supper after the hangin'...Daddy would cook us tenderloin sandwitches...The prime cut was from there and I will admit, it's the best.

    I ain't a farm girl...never claimed to be...never wanted to be but simply stuck into the "lifestyle" from being in a large family.

    This has nothing to do with Chili...so any further discussion might be moved to "new thread" about tenderloin ...

    Bettye Jo

    Quote Originally Posted by Gillman View Post
    The dish is one of those that suit different types of preparations and ways of eating it. I leave out cheese more to save calories (not that these stratagems seem to work much..).

    I don't know if I mentioned this earlier, but I thought one of the commercial brands I tried in Cincinnati had some lamb in it.

    The people I was with insisted only beef was used but it had a lamb taste to me (partly), which is fine because I like that taste.

    This is really an excellent dish in my view. So many American (and Canadian) regional dishes are good if made right and freshly cooked. Sometimes new dishes are created (Buffalo wings, late 1960's; Philly steaks and later cheese steaks (from 1930's on)). Some are very old, e.g., chili (traditional style). I want to try one of those tenderloin sandwiches I've read about you can get in the Mid-west.

    Gary

 

 

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