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  1. #1
    Guru
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    Jim Murray’s Whiskey Bible 2006

    Just got a copy of Jim Murray’s Whiskey Bible 2006. As usual, some interesting reading.

    In the past, I’ve found myself to be in general agreement with Murray but some of his recent ratings give me pause. Is Jim Beam White (85) really better than PVW 20 (79!) or Van Winkle 12 yr Lot B (80)? Or is Old Bardstown 10 yr Estate Bottled (95) that better than ETL Single Barrel (88)? I beg to differ.

    Murray deserves credit for trying to describe and quantify often subtle differences among many different bourbons. And ultimately, his is one man’s opinion. And agreeing or disagreeing with it is what makes the world of whiskey (and this forum) fun.
    John B

    "Drinking when we are not thirsty and making love at all seasons… that is all there is to distinguish us from other animals."

  2. #2
    Enthusiast
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    I have heard some drivel in my time but the examples brought up in the last post take the cake!

    I reakon I could tell JB white after a battleship of beer, 3 vindaloos, no access to a toothbrush and no sleep for a week.

    I agree everyone is entitled to his/her opinion and commend any effort to promote Bourbon, however there is a limit.

    Thanks much for posting this info - this book will be on my avoid list from this day forth!

  3. #3
    Bourbonian of the Year 2011
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    Well, to defend Jim (whom I've read carefully) he likes assertive tastes in bourbon and rye. He feels evidently these are traditional flavors and to be preferred to refined, smoothed-down whiskeys. He also likes a number of young malt whiskies and other very assertive tastes (Lagavulin, etc.). I can't fault him for this, he is going for distinctive, big bruising flavors. The whole point of being able to taste Beam White after, say, a ton of beer and multiple vindaloos is what he is trying to get across, I think.

    Gary
    Last edited by Gillman; 04-05-2006 at 18:17.

  4. #4
    Advanced Taster
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gillman
    The whole point of being able to taste Beam White after, say, a ton of beer and multiple vindaloos is what he is trying to get across, I think.

    Gary
    Either that, or he's plotting to have all the PVW for himself... Brilliant!

  5. #5
    Bourbonian of the Year 2011
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    Well, I would say he seems to have a palate that has an appreciation of a wide variety of tastes. He likes fairly subtle tastes too (e.g. some Canadian whiskies, a number of malts). I think he considers that assertive, highly-flavoured bourbons, especially ones that stress the rye component, are a part of tradition and he wants to point them out, to value them. I don't disagree with the comments on some of his scores as such since I too am not e.g., a Beam White fan but I think I can see where he is coming from.

    Gary

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gillman
    Well, to defend Jim (whom I've read carefully) he likes assertive tastes in bourbon and rye. He feels evidently these are traditional flavors and to be preferred to refined, smoothed-down whiskeys. He also likes a number of young malt whiskies and other very assertive tastes (Lagavulin, etc.). I can't fault him for this, he is going for distinctive, big bruising flavors. The whole point of being able to taste Beam White after, say, a ton of beer and multiple vindaloos is what he is trying to get across, I think.

    Gary
    That is a good point and well brought up Gary...

    I am known for knee jerk reactions now and again over all manner of things - I still have no time for what is drivel in my own tiny mind though...

    Opinion/experience (and maybe writing ability) are the lynchpin of the tasting world and I am not about to cross swords with anyone, let alone someone of Murray's standing. Seems like you enjoyed the book and I daresay learned quite a bit.

    All good!

  7. #7
    Bourbonian of the Year 2006
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    Murray, Yes and No

    I wish that Murray were that consistent with style and flavor profile.
    He's not.
    Colonel Ed
    Bourbonian of the Year 2006

    Comissioned by Paul Patton, 1999

    "It ain't the booze that brings me in here, it's the solace it distills"

  8. #8
    Bourbonian of the Year 2011
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    Oh you know I'm the last to say Jim Murray is always consistent, he's not and no writer on the subect is I think (and not any of us I would hasard to say). It is perfectly valid to point out that Beam White seems not to rate the score he gives it. I said myself I am not a big fan of this whiskey. I'm just trying to say that having read many of his books, I think he has a taste for big dominant flavors but also refined subtle ones especially where these are a hallmark of a style, eg Canadian whisky. He admires Heaven Hill in particular because it is a surviving family operation that makes distinctive products. But he'll rate Beam White (that brand) almost as high because it offers a lot of taste and one (as was well pointed out) that pokes through other drinks and foods, not a bad characteristic when enjoying a "session". Maybe too I just enjoy Murray's enthusiasm, he is (can be) so excited about whiskey, about the whole experience and its traditions.

    But again (and here I have always been consistent!) everyone's take is valid, we are in a subjective arena par excellence. Horses for courses, as the expression goes.

    By the way I want to say I'm just delighted to see the extent of the interest in bourbon and rye here from British, Swedish and other contributors outside the U.S. and Canada. For too long these goodies were kept local and appreciated mostly only here; good to see appreciation for bourbon and rye in Britain and Ireland, where whisky came from, and in northern Europe, where fine spirits have been made forever.

    Gary
    Last edited by Gillman; 04-06-2006 at 11:15.

  9. #9
    Connoisseur
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gillman
    By the way I want to say I'm just delighted to see the extent of the interest in bourbon and rye here from British, Swedish and other contributors outside the U.S. and Canada.
    Gary
    Me, too, Gary. If premium American whiskey is going to conquer the world in the same manner as single malt Scotch, then it definitely need a broader fan base.

    Unfortunately, I also suspect that it will take more distilleries to achieve this. At the moment, though, the prospect of this looks bleak. Hope I´m wrong, though.
    Delighted to see you if you can find me!

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hedmans Brorsa
    Me, too, Gary. If premium American whiskey is going to conquer the world in the same manner as single malt Scotch, then it definitely need a broader fan base.

    Unfortunately, I also suspect that it will take more distilleries to achieve this. At the moment, though, the prospect of this looks bleak. Hope I´m wrong, though.
    Lennart,

    Personally I think the biggest problem with American whiskey here in Sweden is the fact that the labels often don’t revile were the whiskey is distilled. Another smaller problem could be the fact that so few brands are bottled uncut and unfiltered. The label problem reflects a lot with the fact that there is lots of American beer available here even from small microbreweries. They all state were they are brewed.

    Leif
    Swedish lover of American whiskey

 

 

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