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  1. #11
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    Re: who "cuts" their whiskey?

    This is an interesting question which we have discussed here a number of times, and everyone has their own take on it.

    My gambols in the highways and byways of whiskeyana have convinced me that it was taken straight sometimes. Very often it was served with water or soda (the highball). As often or more, it was served in a cocktail.

    The best whiskey was sold in bonded form (100 proof). Very little whiskey, except in the uncontrolled frontier days, would have been sold at a higher proof than that. A lot of whiskey was sold at between 80 and 100 proof. Old Forester's original proof, when it was still a blend of straight bourbons, was 90.

    For straight sipping except as a curiosity, I too would not drink anything uncut over 107. Even at 100-107 that is a very high strength. Often such whiskeys benfit from a dash of water. As to what kind, I use any clean water that is at hand. I just don't think for practical purposes it matters what kind. The taste of whiskey does seem to open up with a little water but then too it matters what proof you start at, and what intensity of flavors you like. I've read that some experts like to taste at 20% abv or something like that, but this seems too low unless you are tasting to calibrate the palate for consumers who drink with water or ice and water. I generally will drink the whiskey at whatever proof it comes and if it seems too "much", will add some water to soften it.

    Gary

  2. #12
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    Re: who "cuts" their whiskey?

    Forgot to mention that I occassionally enjoy adding HOT Water.
    Haven't done it too much lately, even though it's California-cold enough out here. I've also had more experience of doing this with scotch.

    A great technique is to warm the whiskey in a snifter as it sits over simmering water in small gravy sauce pan. Then add the water. Kick back in a bath for extra relaxation.

    However, as my cold lingers on this sounds like it could be on my plate tonight. The other night I went to a bar and drank a hot Rittenhouse.
    VERY TASTY AND WARM!

    There's nothing like warm whiskey to warm one's spirit.

    ??Anyone else like their whiskey hot sometimes??

    -Lear

  3. #13
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    Re: who "cuts" their whiskey?

    Quote Originally Posted by jinenjo View Post

    ??Anyone else like their whiskey hot sometimes??

    -Lear
    Only if putting Irish whiskey (usually redbreast) in hot tea counts.

  4. #14
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    Re: who "cuts" their whiskey?

    Both these resemble hot toddies, very popular in the 1800's.

    Irish saying: what whiskey and butter [meaning, a buttered whiskey toddy] can't cure, there is no cure for".

    Gary

  5. #15
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    Re: who "cuts" their whiskey?

    Quote Originally Posted by Gillman View Post
    Both these resemble hot toddies, very popular in the 1800's.

    Irish saying: what whiskey and butter [meaning, a buttered whiskey toddy] can't cure, there is no cure for".

    Gary
    I've heard of hot toddies. I just didn't know that it simply meant hot water + whiskey.

    Great Irish saying! Buttered implies hot then? I'll add it to my lexicon.

  6. #16
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    Re: who "cuts" their whiskey?

    Yes, a hot toddy was whiskey and hot water. Toddies could be drunk cold, too. Usually when taken hot they were sweetened but this was to the drinker's preference.

    Buttered means that butter is actually added to the toddy. Probably in an earlier day, when whiskey was viewed as a medicine, adding the richness of butter was felt to improve its health qualities.

    The drink survives but more in the form of the hot buttered rum, still known, if not consumed, by many today.

    Only recently did I realise that the term toddy is evidently an affectionate diminutive for the term tot. A tot of course is a drink, a tot of rum, whisky, etc. I guess diminutive is not the right word since the term toddy is longer than tot, oh well.

    Gary

  7. #17
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    Re: who "cuts" their whiskey?

    Quote Originally Posted by Gillman View Post
    Both these resemble hot toddies, very popular in the 1800's.

    Irish saying: what whiskey and butter [meaning, a buttered whiskey toddy] can't cure, there is no cure for".

    Gary
    My Grandma (Scots/Irish) use to say that but I thought it meant a lifestyle that involved eatin' a lot of butter and having a daily dram was good for ya. when I was sick I much prefered the hot toddies she made to that damn cod liver oil!

  8. #18
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    Re: who "cuts" their whiskey?

    Well, thanks for that, and your interpretation may be right. I assumed the hot whisky was buttered because of the existence of the hot buttered rum, but your interpretation, which sounds close to source, may be the correct one, thanks again.

    Gary
    Last edited by Gillman; 01-28-2007 at 16:40.

  9. #19
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    Re: who "cuts" their whiskey?

    Quote Originally Posted by Gillman View Post
    Well, thanks for that, and your interpretation may be right. I assumed the hot whisky was buttered because of the existence of the hot buttered rum, but your interpretation, which sounds close to source, may be the correct one, thanks again.

    Gary
    The interpretation was strictly mine not grandma's. My Grandma passed away in 1999, Grandpa died in 1986 so I can't ask them. I recall the toddies she made were basically a whiskey sour served hot. It may have had butter in it, who knows, I was very young. I'm curious about the etymology of that saying. Think I"m gonna look into that farther.

  10. #20
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    Re: who "cuts" their whiskey?

    I usually cut my whiskey with a bit of ginger ale if not drinking straight!

    Thomas

 

 

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