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  1. #1
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    Canadian Club Reserve

    What are y'all's opinions on Canadian Club Reserve 10 Years Old? Being a native bourbon drinker, I find the taste light but not at all unpleasant. I've been enjoying this for a couple of weeks now and am interested in other's comments.

  2. #2
    Bourbonian of the Year 2010 and Guru
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    Re: Canadian Club Reserve

    I can't say whether I've had the 10yo or not, I don't remember ever trying it, but do quite like the 12yo and the Sherry Cask. I haven't had either in a while, but do think I should pick up another Sherry when I see it next.

    I have been tempted to pick up a 6yo 100 proof to see if it is a good example of a younger high proof style or not, but haven't as yet pulled the trigger on that purchase.
    2010 Bourbonian of the Year

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  3. #3
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    Re: Canadian Club Reserve

    The 100 proof has been calling to me, too, so it may not be too long before I break down and purchase that one. I generally like higher-proof whiskeys.

  4. #4
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    Re: Canadian Club Reserve

    I have all of these versions of C.C. as well as the 15 yr. I like the 10 yr. Reserve the best. The 100 proof is the stronger version of standard Canadian Club. It has a sharper, fruitier flavor to it than the standard. At one point, the Sherry Cask was withdrawn from the US market and the 100 proof has sort of vanished also. I still see both occasionally on store shelves though. When I go to Windsor, Ontario, the duty free stores stock both as a regular item!

    Thomas

  5. #5
    Bourbonian of the Year 2011
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    Re: Canadian Club Reserve

    The Sherry Cask version is back on our shelves, but not a new bottling. It states "Imported" (odd for a Canadian whisky) but the answer is on a label affixed some time after the package the madestating in effect it was brought back to Canada. (I.e., it was made here as all Canadian whisky must be, sent to the U.S. for sale, not sold there, and brought back for sale here; something similar happened with Lot 40 not long ago). Also, another statement added later to the bottle states the whisky is 39.5% abv. The original ABV marking was 40%. Clearly the whisky lost a little alcohol over the years and Hiram Walker felt it necessary to indicate the new level.

    A Corby rep once told me that CC 10 has the most "rye" in it, which I took to mean, the most rye flavoring whisky in it compared to the others in the line.

    I like CC which has a crisp fruity signature as Tom said but in my view it is eclipsed now by Barrel Select and Three Grain. I added a dash of Pikesville to Three Grain the other night and got a great result, the two married beautifully, the Pikesville gave the "middle" I felt the Three Grain needed but the latter's fruity and ryeish quality was maintained and enhanced. I used about 3:1 Three Grain to Pikesville. The current Three Grain is much richer and older than the one first marketed about 10 years ago, it is the same blend evidently but longer matured or the constituents are before it is blended. Excellent product on its own but I found it better with the Pikesville. I think Kittling Ridge is probably distilling somewhere between 160 and 190 for its whiskies and the U.S. straights (maybe also because of the new charred barrel) seem to be heavier and a different product, really. A judicious combination can however result in a drink that many would (I think) prefer to either on its own.

    Gary

  6. #6

    Re: Canadian Club Reserve

    Quote Originally Posted by ThomasH View Post
    ...the 100 proof has sort of vanished also...
    Though not that common on store shelves, the CC 100 proof is current distributor stock in Middle Tennessee. We keep a few 200ml and 375ml bottles in the store where I work, and have a customer who regularly buys it.
    Tim

  7. #7
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    Re: Canadian Club Reserve

    Yes, CC 100 is on the shelf at Spec's here in Houston, too, along with some of the sherry cask, and it looks like it is a regular stock item. I should probably grab a bottle of each and compare them to the CC 10.

  8. #8
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    Re: Canadian Club Reserve

    The Sherry Cask was a regular item in Ohio up until about 2 years ago. The last bottle I bought was when Pa. discontinued it about a year ago. I have never seen any C.C. 100 for sale in Ohio. I bought a bottle in Kentucky last April. It used to be everywhere in Florida but not so much anymore. I see a few stores that do have the 375's as well as the more common 750's. I guess this brand can also go into the category of available in 200ml, although I have never seen any. Thanks for the update Tim!

  9. #9
    Bourbonian of the Year 2011
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    Re: Canadian Club Reserve

    Tim, I may have asked this before (or a version of it), but why do some people buy 100 proof specifically? Do they know it is stronger than a lower proof and think they are getting more bang for their buck? Is there some other reason? I don't mean "our crowd" here but the regular shopper.

    Gary

  10. #10

    Re: Canadian Club Reserve

    Quote Originally Posted by Gillman View Post
    Tim, I may have asked this before (or a version of it), but why do some people buy 100 proof specifically? Do they know it is stronger than a lower proof and think they are getting more bang for their buck? Is there some other reason? I don't mean "our crowd" here but the regular shopper.

    Gary
    Gary, I think the 'bang for the buck' argument is part of the answer. But, also, I think there is an intuitive sense, even among casual imbibers, that the additional proof generally offers more flavor. The end result of that might be that the drinker adds more water but then, of course, his/her bottles last longer. But some, too, will appreciate the flavor, which might lead to further explorations.
    I'd like to think the whisk(e)y drinkers in our store are getting a fair education on the relative values of bottlings -- I am not above pointing out that, say, between an $11 Ezra Brooks 90 proof and a $14 Jim Beam White 80 proof, what you're buying for that extra $3 is more water. Adding their own costs them little or nothing extra. Some, of course, will stick with old favorites but several, I'm glad to say, credit me with turning them toward whiskeys they never would have enjoyed otherwise.
    Tim

 

 

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