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  1. #11
    Bourbonian of the Year 2011
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    Re: American Sandwichiana

    Good ones Tim, thanks. I liked the mini versions of the first type you mentioned which you can get at the Samplers.

    That ham by the way is nothing more (in transplanted, therefore somewhat altered form) to old English cured ham. Long dry-salted or brined (the former was always finer), usually smoked too, wrapped in muslin or similar, developing a characteristic natural mold and deep red color. Local porcine nourishment (peanuts, acorns, whey, slops) would give a particular character as did the smoking materials. It's from the old country (not mine, but never mind ).

    Gary

  2. #12
    Bourbonian of the Year 2002 and Guru
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    Re: American Sandwichiana

    All of the following are Chicago staples:

    The Chicago-Style Hot Dog, which is a hot dog in a steamed poppyseed bun, topped with yellow mustard, bright green relish, chopped onions, tomato wedges, a kosher-style pickle spear, a couple of spicy sport peppers and a dash of celery salt. (and never, under any circumstances, catsup.)

    The Maxwell Street Polish Sausage Sandwich, which is a griddle-cooked polish on a hot dog bun, topped with sauteed onions and sweet peppers.

    The Maxwell Street Bone-in Pork Chop Sandwich, which is served on a hamburger bun, also topped with sauteed onions and sweet peppers.

    The Italian Beef Sandwich, which is thin-sliced roast beef, steeped in a spicy beef broth, topped with either sauteed sweet peppers or hot giardiniera, served on a crusty Italian roll, and either "dipped" (the whole sandwich briefly plunged back into the beef broth) or "dry" (i.e., not dipped).

    The Italian Combo Sandwich, same as above but with a Italian sausage link nestled beneath the beef.

  3. #13
    Bourbonian of the Year 2011
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    Re: American Sandwichiana

    Wow, that all sounds really good. There is a seemingly casual or random quality to the garnishes on that hot dog yet (I know) they are by now very traditional. One wonders how these things start and take root.

    The website (I will try to find it again) that listed many of the sandwiches I mentioned offered an explanation for the origin of the term, "hot dog" I have never seen before although it also mentioned the better known theories (e.g., the illustrator who (comically of course) placed a daschund in a hot dog bun, could not remember the spelling or name, "frankfurter" and so called it a, "hot dog"). The lesser known tale is some Yalies in New Haven in 1894-'95 used to call nearby sausage stands that sold franks in a bun, "dog stands". From that, the term hot dog acquired casual use on the campus, and then beyond. This pre-dates of course the 1904 St. Louis World's Exposition where the hot dog is said to have been invented or at least popularised (the latter may still be true). The website quotes a Harvard magazine of 1895 specifically referring to students "munching hot dogs".

    In German-influenced Kitchener, Ontario, a German-style sausage has been served for years in a split bun that is not a commercial hot dog bun but bears some resemblances to it. It is a sort of biscuit in fact, a firmer, split biscuit. This seems to me the ancestor of the dish and the sausage stands in Cambridge, MA in the 1890's were probably run by immigrants who would have specialised in such fare -or so I infer, and later more commercial versions emerged.

    Gary
    Last edited by Gillman; 02-01-2007 at 13:52.

  4. #14
    Bourbonian of the Year 2002 and Guru
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    Re: American Sandwichiana

    Some history of the Chicago-style hot dog is here.

  5. #15
    Bourbonian of the Year 2011
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    Re: American Sandwichiana

    Thanks for this. I've since noted that Wikipedia contains a great amount of information on the hot dog, which indeed is a subset of the sandwich. (A lot of it rings true and I won't express the usual caveats about this source).

    Not sure about even iced bourbon here, though, but cold new whiskey, closer to the styles of the places where the sausages came from, might do the trick. That rye from West Virginia, Isaiah Morgan for example!

    Gary

  6. #16
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    Re: American Sandwichiana

    Being a NY'er and an Italian I think the Pepper and Egg Hero should be there.
    Joe

  7. #17
    Connoisseur
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    994

    Re: American Sandwichiana

    I grew up in Nebraska, and I've had many a Runza in my time. The basic Runza/bierock is relatively unseasoned - salt and pepper, maybe some garlic and onion, and then the beef and kraut. You could probably add paprika, given the Central/Eastern European heritage/connections of the sandwich, but I never have (my mom taught me how to create a homemade version that's stellar...). The bread is actually a sweet yeast dough, and the sweet and savory elements of the sandwich play off of each other nicely.

    The Runza chain offers an "Italian" runza and a cheese runza, both of which are fine, but the original is still the best, and indeed I think it would make a good bourbon accompaniment.

  8. #18
    Bourbonian of the Year 2011
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    Re: American Sandwichiana

    Thanks TBoner, that's a great evocation of the dish. (But what's the home-made recipe ?). Interesting that an Italian version is offered. Could this suggest the dish has Italian origins..? The name sounds Italian, sort of.

    Joe, that's intriguing about a pepper and egg hero - more details please!

    Gary

  9. #19
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    Re: American Sandwichiana

    Speaking up for the Maryland contingent:

    Crabcake Sandwich - MD Blue Crab cake on roll. Served with Old Bay seasoning, cocktail sauce, and tartar sauce on the side (add to taste).

    I've never had one with bourbon, but I'll bet a nice high-rye bourbon would go nice after eating one.

    Jay
    Saturday night I was downtown
    Working for the FBI
    Sitting in a nest of bad men
    Whisky bottles piling high
    - The Hollies

  10. #20
    Bourbonian of the Year 2010 and Guru
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    Re: American Sandwichiana

    I just thought of one that you might wanna give a shot-The Po Boy.
    2010 Bourbonian of the Year

    As long as you have good whiskey you're not "unemployed", you're "Funemployed!!!"

    I'm no Pappyophile

 

 

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