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  1. #1
    Bourbonian of the Year 2011
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    Stuffed Ham, and Related, Recipes

    Here is a classic recipe for Lincolnshire Chine, taken from Jane Grigson's English Food (1974, Ebury Press).

    The cut used is a cured chine which is a regional English term for a back of bacon, i.e., the loin of pork "bounded on one side by pork back fat, on the other by the backbone. Beteen them you see what looks like a solid piece of lean meat. In fact, through the centre, unseen, a wing of flat bones runs from the vertebrae to make an inner layer". Got it?

    "Make slashes at regular intervals" in the lean meat and stuff with "chopped leeks or spring onions and a lettuce" [English lettuce is rather herb-like, Boston would not do], "parsley" and "a good handful of raspberry leaves (optional)".

    The stuffed pork is boiled, just as a traditional American ham is boiled (by the cook) to cook it. The dish is cooled, sliced, the pink and green no doubt making a charming mosaic, and served cold.

    Mrs. Grigson wrote that in Lincolnshire (on the west side of England) they serve the meat with a sprinking of vinegar but she thinks "a little vinaigrette" would be better. She further advises to serve (evidently for lunch) the meat with bread and butter and salad.

    One can see that the dish could also be served hot, and another recipe from England makes that explicit. It is in a book from the great English food writer Elizabeth David.

    In Mrs. David's version, parsley, mint, lemon thyme, chives, coriander, bread crumbs, and egg can be added to the basic herb mixture.

    She advises that the mixture can be used to stuff not just cured meat but fresh pork, and also can be used to coat a small piece of baked ham in lieu of a glaze. You strip the ham after baking and layer the mixture on until "set" by further baking. Interesting idea, clearly if one does this, incorporating bread crumbs is necessary.

    I would be interested to hear Kentucky or other U.S. recipes for baked stuffed ham and I am sure they are the equal of if not superior to the dish which I believe was the original. I can't find the literary reference I referred to earlier but will keep looking.

    Gary
    Last edited by Gillman; 03-31-2007 at 17:46.

 

 

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