Welcome to the Straightbourbon.com Forums.
Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. #1

    GTS and US liquor laws

    Please forgive me if this has been answered before -- I did a search and couldn't find anything. According to Regan and Regan's The Book of Bourbon, bourbon must finish its second distillation at no higher than 160 proof and must age at no higher than 125 proof in charred new oak barrels for not less than 2 years (p. 212). It's also my understanding that whiskey tends to become lower in proof as it ages because alcohol more readily evaporates through the barrel than does water. If that's the case, how can it be that GTS (and other bourbons) sell at proofs higher than 125? Not trying to cause trouble, just legitimately curious by an apparent conundrum.

  2. #2
    Bourbonian of the Year 2002 and Guru
    Join Date
    Sep 1999
    Location
    Chicago
    Posts
    12,621

    Re: GTS and US liquor laws

    Quote Originally Posted by jcusey View Post
    It's also my understanding that whiskey tends to become lower in proof as it ages because alcohol more readily evaporates through the barrel than does water.
    No trouble. The disconnect is in the statement above. In fact, depending on a variety of conditions, whiskey in the barrel can go up in proof, down in proof, or remain essentially unchanged. In the climates of Kentucky and Tennessee, especially in the hottest parts of the warehouses, the proof tends to go up and especially after long aging, barrel proofs above 140 are common.

  3. #3

    Re: GTS and US liquor laws

    Quote Originally Posted by cowdery View Post
    No trouble. The disconnect is in the statement above. In fact, depending on a variety of conditions, whiskey in the barrel can go up in proof, down in proof, or remain essentially unchanged. In the climates of Kentucky and Tennessee, especially in the hottest parts of the warehouses, the proof tends to go up and especially after long aging, barrel proofs above 140 are common.
    Thank you for your response, cowdery. So at higher temperatures, the water in the spirit is more volatile than the alcohol? What other conditions could cause this to happen?

  4. #4
    Bourbonian of the Year 2002 and Guru
    Join Date
    Sep 1999
    Location
    Chicago
    Posts
    12,621

    Re: GTS and US liquor laws

    I've never gotten a crystal clear explanation. I'm told that the factors are humidity, atmospheric pressure, the size of water vapor molecules, the size of alcohol vapor molecules, the density of the wood, the ratio of air to liquid inside the barrel, and who knows what else, sun spots maybe. It just happens that way. In Scotland, proof invariably goes down, in Kentucky it generally (but not always) goes up.

  5. #5

    Re: GTS and US liquor laws

    Thanks again. You learn something new every day.

  6. #6
    Bourbonian of the Year 2010 and Guru
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Kentucky!
    Posts
    4,749

    Re: GTS and US liquor laws

    There is a good thread here on the particulars of aging, mostly about the specifics of home aging, but also the differences between Scotland and America.
    2010 Bourbonian of the Year

    As long as you have good whiskey you're not "unemployed", you're "Funemployed!!!"

    I'm no Pappyophile

 

 

Similar Threads

  1. GTS Spring 2006
    By mbergal in forum General Bourbon Discussion
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 06-28-2006, 20:00
  2. Trademark Laws
    By **DONOTDELETE** in forum History
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 09-10-2000, 16:46

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Back to top