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  1. #11
    Guru
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    Re: Too hot for Bourbon, this is G&T weather

    Chuck,
    The Germans do it too, mixing a QBA Riesling with sparkling mineral water. This is called a "schorle". A very popular summertime drink in the Fatherland.
    Colonel Joseph B. "Bourbon Joe" Koch

    "Bourbon.....It's cheaper than therapy!!"

  2. #12
    Bourbonian of the Year 2011
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    Toronto, Canada
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    Re: Too hot for Bourbon, this is G&T weather

    All over Europe people always mixed wine with water and, later, soda; the Romans apparently thought it not appropriate to consume wine undiluted. Wonder what they would have thought of us 100 proof and + sippers.

    Sangria probably emerged from earlier "cups" and other such mixtures or punches which combined wine or spirits, fruits, spices, and water or soda.

    Probably in the area it emerged something similar was known, maybe under another name.

    Gary

  3. #13

    Re: Too hot for Bourbon, this is G&T weather

    Quote Originally Posted by BourbonJoe View Post
    Chuck,
    The Germans do it too, mixing a QBA Riesling with sparkling mineral water. This is called a "schorle". A very popular summertime drink in the Fatherland.
    I think this is done with many beverages, including non-alcoholic. I have seen apfelsaftschorle, the apfelsaft being apple juice. I've never had the Riesling variety, but it sounds refreshing.
    "It can giggle all it wants. The galaxy's not getting any of our bourbon!"

  4. #14

    Re: Too hot for Bourbon, this is G&T weather

    I like G&T's as well. I currently use Stirrings mixers, but I'm waiting for the local Bevmo to get Fever Tree in, as I hear it's good. Bombay Sapphire or Tanqueray 10 are the only gins I like. I don't care for regular Tanqueray.

    Joel
    "Oh Bother!" said Pooh as he slapped another magazine in his AK-47...

    http://vinesnwines.blogspot.com

  5. #15
    Enthusiast
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    Sep 2007
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    Lansing, MI
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    345

    Re: Too hot for Bourbon, this is G&T weather

    It is now October, and it is still over 80 degrees in Michigan.
    My whiskey-themed, hot-weather cocktails focus on bubbles. When I was in college, I used to make highballs from Canadian Club and Sprite. Thinking about it now, I just subbed ingredients on a 7&7.
    Now that I am older, I go for something a bit stronger. This summer, up in the mountains, I mixed Rye with sparkling water with lemon or lime. I think my mix was around 1:4 with a healthy sliver of lemon. I found that the rye maintained its flavor and strength even when diluted.
    Jeremy
    www.awksome.com

    “We are what we pretend to be, so we must be careful what we pretend to be.”
    --Kurt Vonnegut


  6. #16
    Connoisseur
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    Oct 2007
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    SE PA
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    804

    Re: Too hot for Bourbon, this is G&T weather

    old august thread barely stretch into october...i know!

    ...but FINALLY, at least here in SE PA, cool weather is somewhat descending! our first real FROST occured yesterday morning...and after too many decades down south, i've had enough of the hot weather!

    why is it that bourbon/whiskey is more or less more palatable, more enjoyable in cooler weather?

    bourbon has been my favorite for some time, but i admit, i never drink it in the summer.....and this summer, i actually did fall for JB and JD (for cold cola cocktails) for the first time!

    summer usually means golden colored beers and rum...

    why is this so?

    i know some bourbon aficianados don't let weather get in the way....
    HUP!

  7. #17
    Novice
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    New York, from Austin, TX
    Posts
    16

    Re: Too hot for Bourbon, this is G&T weather

    I'm the same, polyamnesia. My theory: the cold weather sharpens the senses, so we're more appreciative of the fine details of bourbon than the more obvious and 'louder' qualities of beer, for example. (I'm not disparaging beer, just saying that distillation makes the qualities of bourbon harder to detect.) Personally, my nose is probably clearer in the winter because I have allergies in the winter and use nasal sprays that make my sinuses more open than they are in the summer.

  8. #18
    Connoisseur
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    Oct 2007
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    SE PA
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    804

    Re: Too hot for Bourbon, this is G&T weather

    hmmm....maybe the distillers should come out with a palate lozenge and sinus enhancer with each bottle....so we can really experience, heck, BECOME one with the spirit....

    in all seriousness, i didn't realize rum was such a big northeast thing back in the early times of our country....something about a whiskey tax by politicians who were tied up in RUM money! can't where i read that the other day.....

    anyways, i still think of rum and caribbean...and pirates....and other cliches/stereotypes. but i just don't drink it in winter!
    HUP!

  9. #19
    Bourbonian of the Year 2002 and Guru
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    Sep 1999
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    Chicago
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    12,621

    Re: Too hot for Bourbon, this is G&T weather

    The heyday of New England rum was from about the mid-17th century until the revolution, so a little more than a century. Why did they ship molasses to New England rather than make rum at the molasses source and ship the rum? Probably for a lot of reasons, but one of them might have been the small chance a boat full of rum would have had getting past the pirates on its way to market.

    They probably made rum in the Caribbean strictly for local consumption then exported the rest of their molasses to the nearest markets that would buy it for more than it cost to ship it, because otherwise it was a waste product, the profitable product being white sugar.

    When the 13 colonies declared independence and stopped trading with the English and their Caribbean colonies, New England distillers stopped buying molasses and switched to other raw materials, mostly grain. Trading with England and English possessions was pretty much restored after the War of 1812, but the economics had changed and if people wanted rum, they imported rum, not the molasses to make it from.
    Last edited by cowdery; 11-14-2007 at 23:41.

 

 

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