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  1. #11
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    Re: I'm Trying to Start a New Trend.

    Quote Originally Posted by boone View Post
    I agree with you 100%!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    American, as in this American Spirit!...Do it right, our way...
    I like the way you think! Now, I'm just going to have to remember to quit using the word "dram".

    I have often wondered why "dram" came to mean "a drink" One sixteenth of an ounce really ain't enough to wet your whistle.

  2. #12
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    Wink Re: I'm Trying to Start a New Trend.

    Quote Originally Posted by boone View Post

    Dram...Good Grief, it's a "shot", jigger, pour...

    Oh, I poured me a dram...another skirt one there...
    So, I take it you prefer tipple?

  3. #13
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    Re: I'm Trying to Start a New Trend.

    Quote Originally Posted by cowdery View Post
    The sole exception would be that when stating the proper name of a specific product, the word will be spelled the way the producer spells it, and also be capitalized as befits a proper name.

    Example: That sure was some good scotch whiskey.

    Example: Pass me another drink of that Johnnie Walker Scotch Whisky.
    The problem I see with this is, say you are writting an article about scotch and you mention brands, you might constantly be alternating between the two spellings, or if there are pictures of bottles your spelling will not match the spelling on the labels...not an unsolvable issue, but one that would require more careful attention when editing/spell checking.

    I find that using the "whisk(e)y" notation as a handy way to denote the inclusion of whiskey as a worldwide phenomenon...I will also use it sometimes when referring to the Tennessee products as a way to not give priority to either maker.
    2010 Bourbonian of the Year

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  4. #14
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    Re: I'm Trying to Start a New Trend.

    Quote Originally Posted by barturtle View Post
    The problem I see with this is, say you are writting an article about scotch and you mention brands, you might constantly be alternating between the two spellings, or if there are pictures of bottles your spelling will not match the spelling on the labels...not an unsolvable issue, but one that would require more careful attention when editing/spell checking.

    I find that using the "whisk(e)y" notation as a handy way to denote the inclusion of whiskey as a worldwide phenomenon...I will also use it sometimes when referring to the Tennessee products as a way to not give priority to either maker.
    But have you or would you ever think to write "colo(u)r," "odo(u)r" or "man(o)euv(r)e(r)"?

  5. #15
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    Re: I'm Trying to Start a New Trend.

    Quote Originally Posted by cowdery View Post
    But have you or would you ever think to write "colo(u)r," "odo(u)r" or "man(o)euv(r)e(r)"?
    I guess I kind of think of it as a non-plural inclusive pluralism
    2010 Bourbonian of the Year

    As long as you have good whiskey you're not "unemployed", you're "Funemployed!!!"

    I'm no Pappyophile

  6. #16
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    Re: I'm Trying to Start a New Trend.

    Somehow I prefer these terms to a snort which assumes you aren't even taking the time to taste the whiskee (my new spelling just to confuse the issue) before it tumbles through the gullet to the tummy.
    Dane
    I don't drink to excess. But I'll drink to most anything else.

  7. #17
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    Re: I'm Trying to Start a New Trend.

    I agree that "whiskey" and "whisky" are the same thing: distilled grains aged in wood.

    What is the argument presented by those who say they are different things?

    Further, I consider the Dickel and Maker's Mark use of the latter to be an affectation. Dickel calls themselves a "Tennessee Whiskey" even though they spell it without the "e" on the label.

  8. #18
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    Re: I'm Trying to Start a New Trend.

    I know this is getting off subject and for that I apologize. But I'm curious, when American authors are published in the UK and vice versa is it common practice to change the spelling?

  9. #19
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    Re: I'm Trying to Start a New Trend.

    The late Michael Jackson's Whiskey was published under that title in North America, and under "Whisky" in the U.K. Throughout in the North American version, "whiskey" is used, even in the discussions on whisky in Canada or Scotland. However this practice is not universal, even Jackson's 1980's World Guide To Whisky used the spelling appropriate to the practice in each country it was addressing.

    Personally I think this is purely a matter of individual preference, but that preference normally will want to take into account local practice to ensure better comprehension and staying "on the same page". Every field has its own terminology for this reason. Thus, speaking on this board I try to use the terms "whiskey" when referring to U.S. practice since it is the practice there to do so. When referring to Scots whisky I'll use the term "whisky". But sometimes I won't, simply because I am writing fast or dealing with both topics in one message and it seems over-technical to make this distinction.

    Even Americans sometimes use alternate spellings as Chuck pointed out, and the term whisky is used by Maker's Mark, Dickel and Old Forester, so clearly there is a sub-tradition of using the older spelling in the U.S.

    As for dram and drap and so forth, I like to use the terms generally applicable in the area but sometimes it is fun to use a different term, it makes the text more colorful, in poetic arts that is called poetic license. It is for this reason that a Southern U.S. politician in a famous speech on whiskey in the early 1950's called it the "philosopher's wine".

    And odd things do pop up, e.g., I have regularly heard the term "drappin" in the U.S. South to describe imbibing with (shall we say) enthusiasm and at least one member from Georgia on the other board uses the term from time to time, so a Scots-sounding term has a regional American usage, in this case. A drap clearly is a derivation of "drop", and the very spelling and pronunciation of "drap" attests to the old influence of Scots-Irish speech patterns on American folk speech and practices.

    The old term "tot" (and its alternate form toddy, as in hot toddy) for a shot of booze was widespread at one time in Canada and parts of the U.S. including the South although today it has a vaguely British sound. Think of the name of the premier liquor store in Bardstown, Toddy's...

    Gary
    Last edited by Gillman; 10-13-2007 at 06:15.

  10. #20
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    Re: I'm Trying to Start a New Trend.

    Quote Originally Posted by barturtle View Post
    I guess I kind of think of it as a non-plural inclusive pluralism
    I've been trying to figure out a good way to demonstrate this and think I finally have it:

    Take the sentence:

    I prefer to drink my whisky out of Riedel Single Malt glasses.

    Because of the name of the glass and its association with the Scots tradition, many people would assume you are only speaking of Scotch.

    If you change it to:

    I prefer to drink my whiskies out of Riedel Single Malt glasses.

    It still might be assumed that you refer to only Scotch.

    Even if you change it to:

    I prefer to drink all my whiskies out of Riedel Single Malt glasses.

    Many might think that some people use different glassware for different regions of Scotland.

    Changing it to:

    I prefer to drink my whiskey out of Riedel Single Malt glasses.

    I would think that many would miss the change in spelling and still assume Scotch, simply because of the glasses associations with Scotch.

    However:

    I prefer to drink my whisk(e)y out of Riedel Single Malt glasses.

    Suddenly the wording become very noteworthy and hard to miss the fact that multiple distilling traditions are being referred to. Even if the reader only assumes Scotch and Irish (both being available as single malts), at least they're starting to understand. Changing the glass in each to Riedel Bourbon glass doesn't make much difference, just changes the assumption, using the Glencairn glass swings back to Scotch.

    I think the use of "whisk(e)y" saves you from having to do this:

    I prefer to drink all my whiskies (Scotch, Irish, Bourbon, Rye, Corn, Japanese, Turkish, Dutch, etc.) out of Riedel Single Malt glasses.
    2010 Bourbonian of the Year

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