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  1. #11
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    Re: Bourbon Baked Beans

    Just an FYI story on the history of baked beans:

    http://www.metnews.com/articles/2006...cing062906.htm

    “Baked beans have been popular in North America since before the Pilgrims landed on the eastern shores. Although many people think of Boston as the birthplace of the recipe, according to the National Restaurant Association, the Narragansett, Penobscot, and Iroquois Indians created the first baked bean recipes. The Iroquois discovered the critical ingredient, maple syrup.”

    The baked bean primer went on to recite that the Pilgrims came along and adopted the dish, using molasses and pork fat in the place of maple syrup and bear fat contained in the Native American recipe.

    “This dish was perfect for the Pilgrim household,” according to the Black Jack restaurant’s fact sheet, “because Pilgrim women were not allowed to cook on Sunday, because of their religious beliefs. The baked beans could be cooked the night before and kept warm until the next morning.”

    It continued:

    “During colonial days, Boston became the place that was famous for baked beans, hence the Boston Baked Beans that we’ve all heard of, and the reason that Boston received the nickname of ‘Beantown.’

    And...http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baked_beans

  2. #12
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    Re: Bourbon Baked Beans

    Quote Originally Posted by Jono View Post
    2 (16-ounce) cans baked beans, drained (recommended: Bush's)
    1/2 cup chili sauce (recommended: Heinz)
    1/4 cup bourbon (recommended: Jim Beam)
    1/4 cup real bacon pieces (recommended: Hormel)
    1 tablespoon molasses (recommended: Grandma's)
    2 tablespoons brown sugar
    Ha! I guessed that a Food Network recipe consisting of opening brand name cans and bottles had to be from Sandra Lee. I was right.

    I really love this article about her in Gourmet. It's on her Web site. I guess how you read the article depends on your perspective.

  3. #13
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    Re: Bourbon Baked Beans

    Sandra Lee is quite the hottie....
    "The most futile and disastrous day seems well spent when it is reviewed through the blue, fragrant smoke of a Havana Cigar"

  4. #14
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    Re: Bourbon Baked Beans

    That's interesting about the history of beans. However I am convinced the American dish is of English origin. Beans and bacon, well before the era of canning, is an age-old dish in the English country areas, and via that would have come over on the Mayflower. However, Americans adapted it to local tastes and the two local traits I think were maple sugar where used, possibly molasses (molasses would have been known in Britain from the 1500's after colonisation of the West Indies) and tomato. Tomato was a new world food itself. And so beans reach deep in the English psyche, reaching their apogee perhaps in the 1960's when dishes such as beans and toast were popular (this long before Jaime Kennedy!). The funny thing is, the English canned beans (I am referring to Heinz and similar brands) are really good - for beans - and different than the U.S. equivalent. Anyway beans and bourbon in the kind of recipes mentioned sound great, and something maybe to think about at a Gazebo as a late night snack.

    Gary
    Last edited by Gillman; 06-16-2008 at 05:53.

  5. #15
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    Re: Bourbon Baked Beans

    While it's true that tomatoes (and potatoes and chiles) are a New World food, they originated in South America. I don't think tomatoes were cultivated here until Europeans brought them, and the only wild tomatoes we know about are in South America (little tiny things).

    Most solanaceous plants prefer weather warmer than New England and points north.

    I am not a botanist; I just have read a lot about peppers and tomatoes, which does not translate well into being able to consistently grow them. The tomatoes and tomatillos are growing well, but the peppers are being lazy this year.

  6. #16
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    Re: Bourbon Baked Beans

    Peppers usually flourish in late summer and early fall. Sweet (bell) peppers do ok in early summer, but the hotter varieties are usually coming best just before cool weather comes, which in my part of the country is late October to early November. Of course, YMMV.

    Tim
    Self-Styled Whisky Connoisseur

  7. #17
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    Re: Bourbon Baked Beans

    Late summer will be too late to get any fruit off the habanero. It takes those little rascals over a month to turn from green to orange (or red), and that's after the fruit is set and full sized. Last year at this time I had two good sized plants full of green fruit. I think I put them out too soon in the cool spring.

  8. #18
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    Re: Bourbon Baked Beans

    Well, maybe the Brits did add tomato to the bean before we did, tomato catsup may be English in origin too. One thing is sure, tomatos were cooked initially before eaten raw because it was feared in a raw state they were dangerous. But anyway beans and bacon go way back in England, I'll find a reference.

    Gary
    Last edited by Gillman; 06-16-2008 at 19:36.

  9. #19
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    Re: Bourbon Baked Beans

    For the historically minded, some interesting comments from the canning entry in Alan Davidson's The Oxford Companion To Food:

    "Canning of tomatoes on a large scale began in Pennsylvania in 1847-1849, at a time when this fruit had not yet won acceptance in the English-speaking world. A lively marketing campaign by the canner, who sent samples to President Polk and Queen Victoria, overcame doubts, and it was largely due to this campaign for the canned product that canned tomatoes were being sent to Britain from the U.S.A. .... Cans of pork and beans were made for the fishing fleet, in Portland, Maine, in 1875; and these may be regarded the parents of the cans of 'baked beans'".

    Industrial canning would have followed and adapted home canning and preserving and I would think tomatoes were prepared in this way initially in both America and the U.K.

    I had a book with a beans and bacon recipe, it was an English collection of provincial food recipes. I can't find it and think it may have been lost or discarded in our last move.

    In that book, there was a story that workmen who built wooden sailing ships in the Middle Ages had a traditional meal of beans and bacon. It was said that one special day the King visited the men and tasted their local dish and pronounced it good. (This would have been an unusual event but such did occur occasionally, e.g., Queen Victoria is recorded I think as having visited a whisky distillery or merchant in the 1800's). I think the story said too that the sawdust from the woodcutting and shaping was used to smoke the local bacon.

    I have another English book which records recipes used specifically with bacon and other cured meats. It has a recipe for broad beans and bacon, with no historical notes.
    Last edited by Gillman; 06-17-2008 at 05:37.

  10. #20
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    Re: Bourbon Baked Beans

    Last Night I broke out a can of Friends Boston slow cooked beans put them in a pot added somemore syrup and poured in a large pour of Bourbon Whiskey, I let them smimer for a good long time and added more Whiskey. They not only were good but wonderful ended up eating more then half he can! They just were full of Flavor and sweetness! You would think someone would market Bourbon Baked beans as Perdo markets their Bourbon Chicken Nuggets which are real good!
    Dave Z
    Old Hickory America's most Magnificent Bourbon
    ---------------------------------------------------

 

 

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