Welcome to the Straightbourbon.com Forums.
Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 36
  1. #21
    Connoisseur
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    994

    Re: Bourbon Baked Beans

    John Thorne has an interesting discussion of baked beans - all of his discourses are both historical and cultural in nature - in Serious Pig. It is a Maine-focused discussion, and makes no mention whatever of tomatoes, but does discuss "sweets" vs. the more traditional "unsweets." "Sweets" typically are sweetened with molasses, perhaps rum, but it makes sense that tomatoes would be an alternative that worked its way in over time.

    Additionally, tomatoes are definitely a native plant of the Americas, and were taken back to Europe after the colonization of America. As to who first added them to beans, I can't say, but I don't find much beyond what Gary posted in my rudimentary culinary library. I do know that they were certainly an import to Europe and - as Gary posted - were not eaten in Europe for some time because of fear that they were poisonous. Raymond Sokolov's excellent Why We Eat What We Eat discusses tomatoes at great length, but beans as a whole receive only a cursory mention with no discussion of how they are or were prepared or eaten.

  2. #22
    Bourbonian of the Year 2011
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Toronto, Canada
    Posts
    9,052

    Re: Bourbon Baked Beans

    I found references to baked beans with bacon and similar dishes in The Cookery Of England by Elizabeth Ayrton. This is a combined history of English food and recipe book (circa 1970).

    I had the story of the King and the beans a little awry: here is Ayrton's explanation:

    "George III went to inspect the progress of the building of the Woolwich Arsenal and ate 'al fresco' with the workmen. They were having Beans and Bacon and he liked it so much that he instituted an annual beanfest".

    Go King!

    Further from Ayrton:

    "This [beans and bacon] was a traditional English cottage [i.e., country] dish, but was also a favourite in the great houses [the mansions on landed estates], where in the early summer a side dish known as beans and collops [collops is bacon rashers] often featured at sixteenth- and seventeenth-century feasts".

    From the same book, her recipe for "Pot Baked Beans" uses dried haricot beans, fat bacon [meaning American-type side bacon or fatback], "black or brown treacle" [molasses], onions and dried mustard.

    Note that this recipe omits tomato, and IMO that is because being unknown in England when the dish was devised, it was not traditional. However, she gives an alternate recipe for baked beans which calls for "1 lb. tomatoes, blanched".

    Mrs. Ayrton's book is devoted solely to English cookery and there is nothing in it to suggest any influence from America.

    Still, while I believe this shows baked beans were originally English, recipes and foods had a way of getting around even centuries ago (witness the raising of turkeys for food in England which goes back centuries) so it is possible that the dish involving tomatoes was indirectly of American inspiration.

    Gary
    Last edited by Gillman; 06-30-2008 at 19:41.

  3. #23
    Bourbonian of the Year 2011
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Toronto, Canada
    Posts
    9,052

    Re: Bourbon Baked Beans

    Also, Mrs. Ayrton suggests for one of her bean recipes to use half water, half [hard] cider, since it gives a "delicious flavour". The idea to add alcohol to baked beans seems to go back a fair way, too...

    Gary

  4. #24
    Taster
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Long Island, NY
    Posts
    50

    Re: Bourbon Baked Beans

    This might be blasphemy to some here, but Bush's makes a really tasty bourbon and maple syrup version of their grillin' beans.

  5. #25
    Guru
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Napoleon, MI
    Posts
    7,443

    Re: Bourbon Baked Beans

    Quote Originally Posted by wintermute View Post
    This might be blasphemy to some here, but Bush's makes a really tasty bourbon and maple syrup version of their grillin' beans.
    No not blasphemy, but the Country Style blows them Bourbon Grilling Beans outta the water.
    ovh

  6. #26
    Taster
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Long Island, NY
    Posts
    50

    Re: Bourbon Baked Beans

    Quote Originally Posted by OscarV View Post
    No not blasphemy, but the Country Style blows them Bourbon Grilling Beans outta the water.
    :thumbsup:

    I agree with you there. The Country Style is their best!

  7. #27
    Guru
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    IL
    Posts
    4,559

    Re: Bourbon Baked Beans

    Another historical angle on Wikipedia:

    "According to alternative traditions, sailors brought cassoulet from the south of France, or the regional bean stew recipes from northern France and the Channel Islands.

    Most probably, a number of regional bean recipes coalesced and cross-fertilised in North America and ultimately gave rise to the baked bean culinary tradition familiar today."
    __________________________
    Heinz first sold their canned beans in the U.K. in 1886 and the beans were imported from Canada until 1928.

  8. #28
    Bourbonian of the Year 2011
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Toronto, Canada
    Posts
    9,052

    Re: Bourbon Baked Beans

    I think that is true. I have also read that the French bean stew, cassoulet, was a development of the Jewish cholent. Cholent generally is eaten by devout families, which mine was not (although certainly ethnically Jewish and proud of it). Only in my 20's or later did I get a chance to try it. It is based on navy or lima beans, swelled up with long cooking, and improved with a piece of beef or chicken or what have you. Cholent was popular because it could be cooked through the Sabbath, the oven was left on low or to cool and thus a new fire was not made, but the dish kept cooking of a fashion. It is a very solid dish, but good of its type.

    But who knows, pulses and meats and vegetables are all ancient in numerous cultures...

    Gary
    Last edited by Gillman; 07-21-2008 at 17:19.

  9. #29
    Bourbonian of the Year 2010 and Guru
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Kentucky!
    Posts
    4,749

    Re: Bourbon Baked Beans

    I'm gonna give the Sandra Lee recipe a try tonight...the only other Bourbon Baked Beans recipe I've tried in the past is the one in Regan's Book of Bourbon, which I will admit to not being a fan of.

    After this I'm gonna try a recipe Bettye Jo posted long ago here
    2010 Bourbonian of the Year

    As long as you have good whiskey you're not "unemployed", you're "Funemployed!!!"

    I'm no Pappyophile

  10. #30
    Bourbonian of the Year 2011
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Toronto, Canada
    Posts
    9,052

    Re: Bourbon Baked Beans

    I remember that recipe and its interesting note of adding coffee. Coffee has long been added to some American dishes. There is one ... I can't remember ... not red-eye gravy, or maybe it is.

    I suggest a substitution of any good stout for an interesting variation.

    Gary

 

 

Similar Threads

  1. Bush's Grillin Beans
    By cowdery in forum Bourbon and Food
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 06-22-2008, 14:58
  2. Bourbon and Loaded Baked Potatoes
    By TimmyBoston in forum Bourbon and Food
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 07-17-2006, 20:10
  3. Beamed beans & seeds
    By bourbonmed in forum Bourbon and Food
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 11-14-2005, 19:02
  4. Baked Beans Recipe
    By Dave_in_Canada in forum Bourbon and Food
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 10-23-2003, 21:28
  5. Bourbon Baked Beans
    By **DONOTDELETE** in forum Bourbon and Food
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 09-03-2000, 16:14

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Back to top