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tanstaafl2

Wednesday Tastings!

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tanstaafl2
36 minutes ago, Kpiz said:

Ambitious tasting lineup as always! I don't know how you do it, but glad you do. The Clement barrel selection sounds a bit disappointing, though I'm still tempted to pick up the K&L version since it's slightly older and much higher proof.

 

Interesting notes overall and especially in regards to the blancs. I hadn't previously considered the potential impact that the species of cane could have on the resulting distillate, but it makes sense, much like the species of agave affects the flavor of the Mezcal made from it (though production methods obviously make a big difference too, in both cases)

 

The K&L Clement could be and probably is better as it is much higher proof (barrel proof obviously), a bit older and perhaps picked by someone with a better palate. The local guy is nice and does a fair number of store picks but I have occasionally found the track record a bit spotty, at least in comparison to my own palate, with regard to whiskey. This is the first agricole of course.

 

Go for it!

 

Then I can get a sample... :P

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Kpiz
On 12/16/2016 at 2:48 PM, tanstaafl2 said:

 

The K&L Clement could be and probably is better as it is much higher proof (barrel proof obviously), a bit older and perhaps picked by someone with a better palate. The local guy is nice and does a fair number of store picks but I have occasionally found the track record a bit spotty, at least in comparison to my own palate, with regard to whiskey. This is the first agricole of course.

 

Go for it!

 

Then I can get a sample... :P

 

Ok you convinced me.

 

Sku actually did a review of the K&L Clement selection today that is pretty positive. He interpreted the distillation date to be September 1, 2012 rather than January 9, 2012 (world date formatting convention vs U.S.) which makes the K&L barrel <4yo - is that how you interpreted the distillation date?

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tanstaafl2
23 minutes ago, Kpiz said:

 

Ok you convinced me.

 

Sku actually did a review of the K&L Clement selection today that is pretty positive. He interpreted the distillation date to be September 1, 2012 rather than January 9, 2012 (world date formatting convention vs U.S.) which makes the K&L barrel <4yo - is that how you interpreted the distillation date?

 

Yeah, Clement definitely uses the European convention with the day first followed by the month. It is hard to tell looking at the picture on K&L but the local bottle is definitely distilled on September 1st, 2012 and bottled August 29, 2016 (29/07/2016). David OG at K&L mentioned that theirs was about 4.5yo but he could have been mistaken.

 

Interesting that both are from the same batch that was distilled from the same day.

Edited by tanstaafl2

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Kpiz
2 hours ago, tanstaafl2 said:

 

Yeah, Clement definitely uses the European convention with the day first followed by the month. It is hard to tell looking at the picture on K&L but the local bottle is definitely distilled on September 1st, 2012 and bottled August 29, 2016 (29/07/2016). David OG at K&L mentioned that theirs was about 4.5yo but he could have been mistaken.

 

Interesting that both are from the same batch that was distilled from the same day.

 

Makes sense that they use the European data format. I must have assumed it was distilled January 2012 since they said the barrel was 4.5 years old. Maybe he did some quick mental math and messed it up like I did.

 

In regards to the batch, it is interesting that these two were born on the same day. There's another store here in SF that picked a barrel of Clement as well, and I *think* that it was also distilled on September 1, 2012, but I'll have to double check. I just saw it on the shelf on Saturday, but I was in a rush and only got to glance at it. I didn't even get to check the proof.

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tanstaafl2
14 minutes ago, Kpiz said:

 

Makes sense that they use the European data format. I must have assumed it was distilled January 2012 since they said the barrel was 4.5 years old. Maybe he did some quick mental math and messed it up like I did.

 

In regards to the batch, it is interesting that these two were born on the same day. There's another store here in SF that picked a barrel of Clement as well, and I *think* that it was also distilled on September 1, 2012, but I'll have to double check. I just saw it on the shelf on Saturday, but I was in a rush and only got to glance at it. I didn't even get to check the proof.

 

That violates a cardinal rule of liquor shopping. Never get in a rush as you never know what you might miss out on!

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Kpiz
1 hour ago, tanstaafl2 said:

 

That violates a cardinal rule of liquor shopping. Never get in a rush as you never know what you might miss out on!

 

Rookie mistake, I know. I'll try to go back there soon and get the deets.

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tanstaafl2

Well, we did manage to squeeze in a little tasting to kick off the new year. Apparently sales during NYE this year where a little less than expected but nobody quite knows why that was. It wasn't just the case at my store as distributors were saying it was the same way at a lot of places.

 

Wasn't like I needed to buy anything anyway! Not that it has ever stopped me before.

 

So this week we decided to focus o scotch, mostly because one of the distributors dropped off a bunch of samples from Classic Cask, an independent bottler of various odds and ends.

 

Wednesday tasting 04JAN17 1.JPG

 

Either the picture is a bit blurry or my vision hasn't fully recovered from the tasting! There were three 23yo blended whiskies finished in different casks and 5 single malts. The best of the bunch, really the only one of any note, was a nicely peaty 11yo from Port Charotte (Bruichladdich) at cask strength.

 

But the main feature of the afternoon was a tasting of Kilchoman's fully matured (or in the case of the PX just finished) in various wine barrels. There was the 2014 3yo Port cask at 110 pf, the 2015 4yo Madeira cask at 100 pf and  the new 2016 5yo Sauternes cask also at 100 pf. It appears these were all whiskies produced in 2011 and then barreled and various wine casks and destined for an annual release.

 

Wednesday tasting 04JAN17 2.JPG

 

The port from 2014 was very nice and rather surprisingly good for a 3yo whisky. The Madeira proved to be even better last year in my opinion. Would the Sauternes continue this trend???

 

Wednesday tasting 04JAN17 3.JPGWednesday tasting 04JAN17 4.JPG

 

Well, in a word, no. It wasn't bad by any means but the Madeira cask remains the top of this little group. Really well balanced with red fruit dominating the palate and the smoke gradually building into a nice reasonable long finish with a good balance of fruit and smoke but little or no iodine character more typical of some of the south coastal Islay whiskies. I would buy another of this one if I saw it.

 

The Sauternes sadly was not as well integrated. Perhaps the more delicate sweet white wine just wasn't able to stand up to the peat but this one didn't bring much fruit to balance the smoke. Maybe it needs some time to "open up" as I have seen other reviews that have apparently gotten more apple, orange and spice in the palate and finish.  

 

The beautifully coppery colored Port matured still showed well and has the added benefit of some extra proof. It also provides some nice balance of red fruit and peat but perhaps not quite to the degree the Madeira does.

 

The PX was the least popular of the group (It was a finished whisky and not fully matured) and is also about 5 years old like the Sauternes but was originally bottled in 2009. Not sure why but it just didn't seem to have as much appeal as the other three. I am not sure how long it spent in the sherry casks but definitely has a touch of that match stick/sulphur character that one sometimes gets from sherry finish (which I don't mind and if fairly light actually kind of like but and some people don't care for at all).

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maybeling

Disappointing about the Sauternes matured. Definitely agree about the Madeira matured one though. :) Have you had a chance to try the any of the Loch Gorm releases SxS?

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tanstaafl2
41 minutes ago, maybeling said:

Disappointing about the Sauternes matured. Definitely agree about the Madeira matured one though. :) Have you had a chance to try the any of the Loch Gorm releases SxS?

 

I am not ready to completely give up on the Sauternes cask yet but it was a bit disappointing because the port and madeira casks were good from the start as I recall.

 

I haven't tried to keep up with the annual batches of Loch Gorm and the only have one at present I think may be the original release in 2013 which was 5yo. I believe it is a fully matured Oloroso cask so it might have been a better choice than the PX finished cask since the other three were also fully matured in the cask.

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tanstaafl2

Winter is coming! And it is very, very expensive...

 

This week it was a bit of "Fire and Ice"! Local distributor brought the most recent "themed" whisky from Highland Park. Following what I thought was the rather hokey looking "Valhalla" series which was very spendy and did not appear to be all that rare (upwards of 20000 or more bottles for each of the 4) or original (the wooden frame was identical with the exception of the last one which had a coat of black paint on it) or particularly very good whisky for that matter (ok that might just be my opinion although reviews seemed to be mixed at best) we got to try this newest pair of whiskies, Fire and Ice (OK, so Ice came first).

 

Wednesday tasting 25JAN17 1.JPG

 

Of course, as is our nature, I dragged out the standard 15 and 18 to see if either of these two $300 (Yes I said THREE HUNDRED DOLLARS!) whiskies are worth a tinker's damn (and just what the hell is a tinker's damn anyway???)

 

Short answer? NO!!! The 15 and 18 are very nice, if sadly underproofed, whiskies that have gradually moved beyond the cost I would be willing to pay for them. But as long as I still have tem I am happy to try them.

 

The Ice starts off encouragingly at 107.8 proof but goes down hill quickly after that. Drinks ok at proof but it is a soft and slightly sweet whisky that just never does anything. Talk about laying a big fat frozen egg. Not sure I would pay $100 for this one, much less $300. But hey, it has that nice wooden thingy to go with it!

 

For the Fire version they break out some more of that black paint for the wooden thingy and put it in a brooding red bottle. But it does start off with a positive. It is fully matured in reused port casks. HP and port? Yes, please! But then they crap all over it by bottling it a miserly 90.4 proof. Say Whaaaat???? Well, we are here now so we might as well give it a try! There is indeed some nice red fruit character and the charm of the light HP peat style carries through. And that must have been some heavily reused port casks as I expected more than I got from the port influence. The long gone port matured 16yo Bowmore puts this thing to shame. Although in today's market it would probably cost close to $300 too. So this is a better drink by far compared to the Ice. But $300? Not a chance in hell, wooden doohickey or not.

 

Over all a bit depressing.  But at least there is a bright side! I didn't pay for either of them...

 

So next we moved on to something just a bit different.

 

Wednesday tasting 25JAN17 2.JPG

 

These are a couple of oddball French whiskies acquired in the recent past from K&L.

 

The Uberach "Assemblage" is a single malt from the Alsace region of France that has a touch of peat in it and then is aged for 6 or so years in several different barrels. This particular blend from K&L, one of only 160 bottles apparently, is a mix of French Oak and Banyuls (a sweet fortified port like French wine). The small number of bottles makes me wonder if small casks are used but I would think they would have a hard time aging for 6 years and the pictures on the linked story would seem to suggest otherwise. This was indeed a very unique floral spirit although that little hint of peat did manage to hang around making for an interesting combination. I found it to be quite pleasant and look forward to trying it again. The only downside is a fairly low proof of 84.4. But I might even spring for one of the single barrels should that ever come to fruition.

 

The Hedgehog is a single grain whisky that is about 4 or so years old, starts with a bourbon-style mashbill and spends time in heavily toasted French Oak before being finished in Cognac casks for three or so years. The background story in the link is rather unusual and so is the whisky! I would have thought the time in cognac would have mellowed this a bit more put this is pretty balls to the walls grain in character. Perhaps we should have heeded the advice to give this some aeration. Unrefined and perhaps a bit grappa like was a good description of it but I am not sure I can call it a long easy finish! Interesting and maybe will have some applications in a rough and ready cocktail but lets just say I am glad we tried the Uberach first.

 

Hey, one out of two ain't bad!

 

we also did a tasting of Stanahan's as a local store is going to be getting a store pick of some soon (not sure it is truly a "single barrel" since most everything they do is blended. We tried it beside an older batch of the regular Stranahan's and the very first batch of the Diamond Peak, which is reported a slightly older blend of their barley whiskey.

 

The regular (which was purchased right around the time Stranahan's was sold and was likely produced before the change over in ownership) was surprisingly sweet, almost bubble gum, on the nose but it was not as overwhelming on the palate. Different from what I remember and a little unbalanced but not unpleasant. The Diamond Peak was a little drier but seemed to lack anything really noteworthy. A bit of a disappointment. Surprisingly the sample for the store bottle was a pretty good balance between the two that we all really enjoyed it. Not exactly scotch despite the all barley (all malt I think) mashbill but interesting and enjoyable to drink.

 

Who'd of thunk it!

 

 

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tanstaafl2

Well, after an extended break for a variety of reasons we were able to get back to a Wednesday tasting again. This week was a veritable hodgepodge of spirits selected from a number of bottles that have accumulated recently.

 

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The featured pairing was the new WT Decades alongside the previous WT Master Keep 17yo. It was fairly difficult to do these two blind as the difference in proof (104 versus 86.6) made it pretty clear which was which. Both have a nice rich mouth feel but the 17yo is a bit more dry with a nice leather vanilla tone that provides a hint of sweetness.

 

The Decades higher proof makes it easy to determine when compared to the 17 and it gives it a touch more spiciness. But it too has a nice rich mouth feel and similar leather/vanilla notes although to me it seemed to offer a touch more sweetness and less oak. A drop or two of water helps balance out the spice and sweetness but perhaps mutes the taste just a touch. Overall, while close, I still prefer the 17yo.

 

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After that we tasted the Old Potrero Hotalings 16yo again. This one seems to be evolving with time and generally getting better and better! It is still a softer whiskey but now seems to have notable and pleasant citrus/orange character towards the back of the palate and in the finish.

 

Next was the new Redbreast Lustau edition which is similar to Redbreast (although NAS) that has been finished in sherry "seasoned" barrels made by the Spanish sherry producer Lustau. To me this seemed a little overly sweet and not well balanced. It will need some further research but my initial inclination is to stick with Redbreast cask strength!

 

We also gave the newly acquired 28yo Glenturret scotch a try. This is bottled at a low barrel proof of 99.4 proof. Glenturret is a malt used in the Famous Grouse blend but I had not had it by itself before. This one creamy mouthfeel and a somewhat floral taste on the palate that we couldn't quite identify but I didn't get much in the way of red fruit or sherry influence from it.

 

Then we turned our attention to rum! The selection included a 1999 17yo Caroni rum at a barrel strength of 109.8 along with a sample of the AD Rattray bottling of 18yo Caroni at 92 proof. Compared with that was the new Barrell rum which was a 7yo Jamaican pot still rum bottled at a very substantial 134.73 proof! Unlike the Caroni the presumption is that this one spent most of its aging time in the warm Caribbean sunshine!

 

The Rattray was the least funky of the three although it still had some of the expected ester/acetone note but was lighter in character. The Creative Whisky Caroni had much more of the earthy funk with a good amount of diesel/acetone flavor as well as some nice underlying fruit (apple perhaps?) character and hints of vanilla.

 

But the Barrell rum was by far the funkiest of the group! For me, and I had already had quite a bit at this point, it welcomed some water which helped level it out and brought a good bit of overripe banana character to the fore (and I don't often get banana nose or tastes) to help balance the petrol/nail polish remover character that was present.

 

What a way to finish!

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meadeweber

Glad to see that Wednesday Tastings are back.  I always enjoy reading these.  Thanks Bruce.

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tanstaafl2

Has been a bit hit or miss of late but always enjoy getting the chance to do it!

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Kpiz

Excellent lineup and notes as always! Very interesting comparison of the two Caronis. The Creative Whisky Company/Exclusive Rums bottle sounds more similar to the Velier Caroni 15 than to the Rattray, what with the fruity notes. I enjoy the Rattray but it doesn't have any sweet or fruity flavors to complement the diesel. The lower proof certainly doesn't help it, either.

Edited by Kpiz

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Paddy

^^^Good work Bruce, as I'd been eagerly awaiting your take on the Barrell.:P

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tanstaafl2
1 hour ago, Paddy said:

^^^Good work Bruce, as I'd been eagerly awaiting your take on the Barrell.:P

 

Trying to make up a bit for the long absence. No doubt all of these deserve some time on their own for more in depth contemplation. We did start with the WT first though so I could get a sense of them on a relatively fresh palate!

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tanstaafl2
1 hour ago, Kpiz said:

Excellent lineup and notes as always! Very interesting comparison of the two Caronis. The Creative Whisky Company/Exclusive Rums bottle sounds more similar to the Velier Caroni 15 than to the Rattray, what with the fruity notes. I enjoy the Rattray but it doesn't have any sweet or fruity flavors to complement the diesel. The lower proof certainly doesn't help it, either.

 

It was definitely the more interesting of the two for me. Not sure if that is the rum itself, the proof or most likely a little of both!

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tanstaafl2

Just a "light" tasting this week! Well, it always starts out that way.

 

58d44582550b6_Wednesdaytasting22MAR174.jpg.f67d2a5d989fd3f26030c33d5b14b8cb.jpg

 

So we started with a rare appearance from wine. But it was not just any wine as this was the signature Vin Juane from the Jura region of France that is made with a particular grape, Savagnin (from the Gewurztraminer family), that is then aged under a type of yeast that develops like a flor in sherry but is known as a "voile" in France and is aged for about 6 years. One big difference from sherry is that this wine is not fortified with spirits. It had lots of nuttiness like a fino or manzanilla sherry but was a bit brighter and fruit forward, maybe apricot. Also a pleasant touch of salinity that helped it work well with my swordfish the night before (It was opened the night before at a delightfully raucous dinner at one of my favorite restaurants/bars where we ate, drank and waited out a line of thunderstorms for about 5 and half hours. A good time was had by all! Well, at least by me and ultimately that is what is important, right???). Sadly even 12-14 hours later the wine had lost a bit of something. This is one you need to open and drink. Lesson learned! Fortunately only a bit was left and that was primarily for the purpose of sharing.

 

From there we kind of kept it in the same general family as we moved on to a Palazzi Spanish brandy that had been finished in a Fino sherry cask. While not quite bone dry to my taste this was definitely a unique dry brandy with some flinty citrus notes and a bit of salinity. Not something I had before to be sure. We momentarily skipped the Montbourgeau Macvin du Jura (you are keeping up, right???) and went next to the latest Glenmorangie Private Edition, Bacalta. This was relatively typical Glenmo whisky that was finished in "baked" Malmsey madeira casks for a couple of years or so. Whoa, Nelly! This thing was full of some deep baked chocolate notes that were in the nose but really came out in the palate. But it was also on the sweeter side. Kind of like last years less well balanced Milsean and while it was sweet it seemed to work better. Must be the Malmsey madeira which is generally the sweetest style of madeira.

 

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Next up proved to be a real delight. This was a 2002 vintage Depaz Agricole that had been aged a minimum of 11 years and was bottled at 90 proof (I could have used more proof but then when is it not a good idea?). Still, it was a lovely roasted light chocolate/cinnamon spirit that proved to be a delightful sipper. No idea what influence everything before it had been but I will be trying it again to see.

 

Then it was back to the Montbourgeau Macvin du Jura for dessert (well, at this point MORE dessert!). This is the Jura regions version of Pineau des Charentes but it seems to be a bit more subtle in its sweetness with a bit more of the grape sneaking through to me. De-lightful!

 

58d44595508e5_Wednesdaytasting22MAR172.jpg.7d9c7ccbd9b008436def9786ac07a0a4.jpg

 

About this time a customer shows up and buys the Bomberg's Declaration 100 proof bourbon and offers us a taste. Who am I to say know? This is sourced by Michter's so it isn't something I would be likely to buy myself, especially after they unceremoniously squashed the effort to legitimately revive the name, but in this case the price was right! No age statement on the label so I presume it is at least 4 years old (then again it is an NDP whiskey so who knows?). I have been unable to find a source but to me it tastes a lot like Old Forester Signature and B-F certainly sounds right for Michter's.

 

Then a vodka brand rep wandered in and just seemed impolite to turn it down, even if it was vodka! This was Bellion and it wasn't just any vodka, it was good for you! Or so says the rep. It is made with "NTX" which it turns out is essentially sugar. Part is derived from licorice root and part is mannitol (which is good for making you pee!). So it was a sweet but otherwise flavorless vodka. Not my cup of tea. Or liquor for that matter.

 

58d445a0e6545_Wednesdaytasting22MAR171.jpg.9dac6388ab6481c62d6416003608cf3c.jpg

 

At this point our plans for a light day were pretty well shot to hell and we had a couple of beers in the cooler that had been there for awhile. Both were barrel aged variations of Sierra Nevada standards, Narwhal stout and Bigfoot Barleywine. The stout was flavored with currants which I found to be undetectable while the barleywine was a ginger flavored concoction. Surprisingly the Bigfoot was a bit more interesting but neither was great or even very good. Either too much time sitting, even in the cooler, or just not very good to start with. Maybe both.

 

So a bit of an unsatisfying ending to an otherwise pleasant afternoon. It happens.

 

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Paddy

^^^Tough ending, but sometimes one must take one for the team.  Thanks!

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tanstaafl2

This week we came up with a new game for Wednesday tastings. It was basically a new way for us to embarrass ourselves during blind tastings!

 

But first we did a little call back to last week. I have been able to acquire 6 of the 8 private editions that have been released by Glenmorangie. My interest was more in bourbon back in January 2010 when the first one was released (Sonnalta PX) and I really did not begin to take a strong interest until the fourth release, Ealanta, which was a 19yo whisky matured in virgin American oak that was originally described as "heavily charred" but which later proved to in fact be toasted. hence the connection to bourbon. I have since acquired a bottle of the second edition, Finnealta, and a sample of the third, Artein (which I suppose means I have at least a little of 7 of the 8), which I had tried a small taste of some time ago. When I traveled to Glenmorangie in 2015 the one bottle I was looking for was the Sonnalta PX. One of the first thing I saw was the box it comes in but. alas, it was only a tease as the box was empty. My search continues for a bottle of it (at our near retail which makes it quite unlikely of course).

 

All this was to say the one I liked the least was last years version, Milsean (jat felt the same so it wasn't just me). Billed as a sweet retoasted wine cask finished whisky, my bottle was rather unremarkable and not really even that sweet. I was not inspired to seek out another. The Bacalta was finished in Malmsey madeira (the sweetest style of madeira) and was a bit on the sweet side (although not unpleasantly so) but had a nice chocolate character that melded nicely with a bit of rancio from the sun baked madeira casks.

 

58dd63544c9f1_Wednesdaytasting29MAR171.jpg.3956b3f4efc8a1dc5e6adf91dc481003.jpg

 

So we thought this was a good time to give the Milsean another chance while tasting the Bacalta once more to see if it was as nice as the previous week when it was first opened and throwing in another big wine finished version, the Artein.

 

Well, the Milsean was as disappointing as before. Despite having perhaps a bit more color than the Bacalta in the bottle it remained relatively bland and uninspiring. The bacala on the other hand was as big, bold and brash as before with a solid mouthfeel, well balanced maltiness and sweetness overlain with a nice chocolate tone and that still present rancio note that helped bind it all together. The Artein was also pretty solid with a nice barrel mustiness and big red berry character in the nose that carried into the palate and some interesting earthy, spiceness filling out a nice finish. Oh well, 2 out of 3 ain't bad!

 

And now back to our game!

 

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We had collected 8 whiskey samples and we decided to take the list of 8 to choose from but select at random only 5 of the samples and see if we could figure out which was which. The list included:

1. ASW Fiddler Bourbon

2. Bernheim wheat whiskey

3. Four Rose OESK store selection

4. JW Dant from the 80's

5. Old Rip van Winjkle 10yo

6. Sazerac 18 Rye (year unknown)

7. Springbank 19yo cask strength recharred sherry cask (Our only non American in the group!)

8. Wild Turkey Tribute

 

After trying each sample we all put down what we thought each sample was. After trying and in some cases retrying, five whiskeys I should point out it tends to be a lot of whiskey! In the end I managed to get only 2 of the 5 correct. On the plus side that was 100% better than the other two tasters! In other words this was pretty hard.

 

The five random samples proved to be:

1. Sazerac 18 Rye - I said this was the Dant or maybe Tribute. Never would have guessed Sazerac Rye! Tasted old and lower proof and a bit musty like dusty bourbon can.

2. Bernheim wheat whiskey - Correct! Softer, lower proof and a bit sweeter made me lean towards Bernheim.

3. ASW Fiddler Bourbon - Correct! In this bunch the young twang was hard to miss. I would have been disappointed if this was anything else!

4. Four Rose OESK store selection - I said this was Old Rip. It was the best whiskey of the 5 which was saying something since I liked it better than the Old Rip that followed.

5. Old Rip van Winjkle 10yo - I said this was WT Tribute. Don't recall if I ever had Tribute. It was good. Just not as good as the FR.

 

We might have to do something like this again. Just glad the Springbank wasn't in there. Would have been embarrassing to have missed it!

 

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After last weeks disappointment with the finishing beers we decided to go with something a bit fresher this time. A 13.9% ABV this was a big somewhat syrupy but pleasant way to cap the day. Definitely vanilla forward as expected but much more chocolate character than coffee which suited me just fine. Only disappointment for me was that it was a little flat in the finish. But much better than last week!

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maybeling

Fun! What OESK was it? Re: the Saz 18 I've always loved the musty/dusty/old book smell of it.

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tanstaafl2
On ‎4‎/‎1‎/‎2017 at 5:18 PM, maybeling said:

Fun! What OESK was it? Re: the Saz 18 I've always loved the musty/dusty/old book smell of it.

 

The one from DPS that Herb did I believe. Surprisingly good. Might have to see if he has more.

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smokinjoe
45 minutes ago, tanstaafl2 said:

 

The one from DPS that Herb did I believe. Surprisingly good. Might have to see if he has more.

Surprisingly good?  You saying Herb's palate sucks?  

:lol::lol::lol:

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tanstaafl2
56 minutes ago, smokinjoe said:

Surprisingly good?  You saying Herb's palate sucks?  

:lol::lol::lol:

 

Well, there have been a couple in the past that might not have been my first choice... :blink:

 

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maybeling
1 hour ago, tanstaafl2 said:

 

Well, there have been a couple in the past that might not have been my first choice... :blink:

 

 

Did he do an OESK? I may have missed that one. He just got in an OESQ 110 proof @ 8 yrs 1 month. I picked one up and have a feeling I may be getting another, it's very drinkable. Also got an OBSV 100 proof at 7 years. Didn't grab that one.

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