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Any Certified Bourbon Stewards here?

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Bourbon Air Tours

I completed my test yesterday and got an email with my passing score. I am now a Certified Bourbon Steward. Are any members here in the Stave and Thief Society?

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Curtis Reed

is that anything like a level 5 whisky sommelier certification from Whisky Marketing School with those goofs from Austin TX?  ?

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Bourbon Air Tours
3 hours ago, Curtis Reed said:

is that anything like a level 5 whisky sommelier certification from Whisky Marketing School with those goofs from Austin TX?  ?

I don't think so. This is at Louisville, KY

 

https://staveandthief.com/certification/

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kevinbrink
5 hours ago, Curtis Reed said:

is that anything like a level 5 whisky sommelier certification from Whisky Marketing School with those goofs from Austin TX?  ?

It's a far more legitimate program

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Bourbon Air Tours
21 minutes ago, kevinbrink said:

It's a far more legitimate program 

Most of the tour operators encourage the tour guides to earn the Bourbon Steward certification. It does not make them experts, but at least they have a basic knowledge of the different types of whiskey, the distilling process, and the basics of conducting a tasting. I wanted the certification because I do the aerial tours over the distilleries and want to describe the processes and methods. I do not profess to be a distiller by any means, but John Rempe, the head distiller at Lux Row, took one of my tours and was quite complimentary about my narration.

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flahute

I'd guess that a lot of the members here could earn this certification easily based on what they already know.

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Richnimrod
Posted (edited)

^^^Me too; but, why would we feel the need for such a 'certification'?   For me at any rate, it's hobby, an avocation if you will.   A vocation may require it, I can understand that; but not an avocation... at least for me.

Edited by Richnimrod

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DCFan
2 hours ago, Richnimrod said:

^^^Me too; but, why would we feel the need for such a 'certification'? 

What’s this “we” stuff? Speak for thyself. The OP said he got certified for business purposes, good for him and his clientele. There are other posters here who are in the business so they may or may not benefit by this certification. 

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Bourbon Air Tours

When you take a distillery tour you rely on the tour guide to be knowledgeable, right? You are learning from them as you compare how each tour provides an insight into how their distillery operates and learn why their product differs from one another. We each have our own preferences in what we prefer in a Bourbon. This has nothing to do with that. This is a method of teaching how those tastings differ from one another. It is how to analyze what our tasting is telling us in terms of how those tests are created.

 

I agree that most here could easily take the test and become Bourbon Stewards. All it does is certify you know the laws, rules, and basic differences between all varieties of whiskeys. The Executive Steward program actually teaches you how to distill from mashbill selection to aging. It is one thing to enjoy the product, another to create it.

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The Black Tot

Lots of people have called me certifiable.

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Bourbon Air Tours
10 minutes ago, The Black Tot said:

Lots of people have called me certifiable.

I have been for years. I now have it in writing on proper authority.

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Charlutz
Posted (edited)

I’ll try to be moderate (and not a moderator) and say that you all agree on more than you disagree. The ‘certification’ may not be worth much to some, but the knowledge certainly is. If you gained valuable knowledge through the certification than we all should agree it was worth it. If it’s just a piece of paper and you gained no new knowledge then it has no value for many, but may still hold important value to you if your clientele or others important to your business place value in it. 

Edited by Charlutz
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Richnimrod
5 hours ago, DCFan said:

What’s this “we” stuff? Speak for thyself. The OP said he got certified for business purposes, good for him and his clientele. There are other posters here who are in the business so they may or may not benefit by this certification. 

If you hadn't deleted the remainder of my post, you'd have answered your own question, DCF. 

I said; "A vocation may require it; but not an avocation...at least for me".   (Emphasis added.)

As you can see, I wasn't speaking for anyone but myself.

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Harry in WashDC

At the risk of throwing 120 proof spirit on a fire, let me say this about that -- The Stave and Thief website (thanks for the link, BTW) wouldn't let me take the test without buying their guide which is $60 or about what I paid last week for four 750s of VOB 100.  And, as many of you have noticed, I get LOTS of things wrong when I start lecturing about bourbon even AFTER reading all the Bernie "Whiskey Prof" lessons.  Imagine how insufferable I'd be with a Certificate!!  Besides, I'm not sure I want to find out how wrong I am about stuff.

 

Nevertheless,

 

I like the idea of a certification for some: for instance, I kind of wish some establishments that sort of try to brag about their "bourbons we have" would buy at least one of their tenders the Guide and then make the tender take the test.  My eyes get tired of rolling when I've already checked out the selection and order something only to have the tender ask, for example, "Have you tried Poltergeist?  It's a lot better than what you ordered,"  Poltergeist being, of course, some NDP that costs 3 times a 750 what WT 101 costs.  I'm never sure, initially, whether they are upselling or whether they really believe P is better than WT.  One or two questions usually resolves my dilemma, and I can drink in peace OR converse, depending.

 

And, another thing - OJT with the obligatory trial and error has worked really well for me when bourbon is the subject at hand.  Literally.B)

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DCFan
2 hours ago, Richnimrod said:

If you hadn't deleted the remainder of my post, you'd have answered your own question, DCF. 

I said; "A vocation may require it; but not an avocation...at least for me".   (Emphasis added.)

As you can see, I wasn't speaking for anyone but myself.

There’s no playing on both sides of the fence. “We” are all in agreement on that. ;)

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Bourbon Air Tours
1 hour ago, Harry in WashDC said:

At the risk of throwing 120 proof spirit on a fire, let me say this about that -- The Stave and Thief website (thanks for the link, BTW) wouldn't let me take the test without buying their guide which is $60 or about what I paid last week for four 750s of VOB 100. 

 

The $60 guide has all of the materials you need to answer all of their quiz questions. It contains a code that you need to input in the test registration form. It can only be used once. After passing the test you get a secret handshake and a nice lapel pin. As my aerial tour business will benefit from having this certification, I can write it off. If you gain no benefit from the certification, you can look at it as pure vanity. Although it is not mandatory for employment in the Bourbon Tour industry as a guide, they do look favorably on applicants who have it.

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fishnbowljoe
8 hours ago, The Black Tot said:

Lots of people have called me certifiable.

Dammit Paul!  You stold my line. I was gonna say that many of us here are certifiable. :wacko:

 

Biba! Joe

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callingtom
3 hours ago, Harry in WashDC said:

At the risk of throwing 120 proof spirit on a fire, let me say this about that -- The Stave and Thief website (thanks for the link, BTW) wouldn't let me take the test without buying their guide which is $60 or about what I paid last week for four 750s of VOB 100.  And, as many of you have noticed, I get LOTS of things wrong when I start lecturing about bourbon even AFTER reading all the Bernie "Whiskey Prof" lessons.  Imagine how insufferable I'd be with a Certificate!!  Besides, I'm not sure I want to find out how wrong I am about stuff.

 

Nevertheless,

 

I like the idea of a certification for some: for instance, I kind of wish some establishments that sort of try to brag about their "bourbons we have" would buy at least one of their tenders the Guide and then make the tender take the test.  My eyes get tired of rolling when I've already checked out the selection and order something only to have the tender ask, for example, "Have you tried Poltergeist?  It's a lot better than what you ordered,"  Poltergeist being, of course, some NDP that costs 3 times a 750 what WT 101 costs.  I'm never sure, initially, whether they are upselling or whether they really believe P is better than WT.  One or two questions usually resolves my dilemma, and I can drink in peace OR converse, depending.

 

And, another thing - OJT with the obligatory trial and error has worked really well for me when bourbon is the subject at hand.  Literally.B)

I was told there would be no math.

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Harry in WashDC
2 hours ago, Bourbon Air Tours said:

The $60 guide has all of the materials you need to answer all of their quiz questions. It contains a code that you need to input in the test registration form. It can only be used once. After passing the test you get a secret handshake and a nice lapel pin. As my aerial tour business will benefit from having this certification, I can write it off. If you gain no benefit from the certification, you can look at it as pure vanity. Although it is not mandatory for employment in the Bourbon Tour industry as a guide, they do look favorably on applicants who have it.

THX!

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Bourbon Air Tours
23 minutes ago, callingtom said:

I was told there would be no math.

If you can count to 200 you are good.

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Bourbon Air Tours
Quote

I like the idea of a certification for some: for instance, I kind of wish some establishments that sort of try to brag about their "bourbons we have" would buy at least one of their tenders the Guide and then make the tender take the test. 

1

They do have a certification program for "establishments" that includes 1 Executive Bourbon Steward Training + Handbook,  1 Exclusive Stave & Thief Society Spirit Sensory Training Kit,  10 Bourbon Steward Handbooks, and 10 Online Test Codes. The list of "establishments" includes almost all of the distilleries who have tastings available. If you have been there, you likely were served by a Certified Bourbon Steward.

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Richnimrod
2 hours ago, DCFan said:

There’s no playing on both sides of the fence. “We” are all in agreement on that. ;)

Excuuuuuuuse me! :lol:  I still say; I speak only for myself, though.   And, I'll go a bit further and make this disclaimer: If anybody EVER Feels that I'm speaking for him or her; I ain't!

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BourbonGuy
Posted (edited)

After watching the movie SOMM, this might be great to do as a team effort.  I assume (didn't read the entire page on the link supplied) there must be a tasting portion. 

 

I was thinking of possibly retiring this year.  This might be one of those challenges you do for fun.  What is better than learning more about the hobby you love?  Either that or I get a Captains license. 

 

Edited by BourbonGuy
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FacePlant

I would wager that most who've been here for a while would pass the test easy. I admit that a few years back I did the dog and pony. Facts picked up at the time and not known by me, had more to do with Irish whiskey than any other material covered. They also covered Scotch and Canadian I think? Any bar or restaurant that holds itself out as a "bourbon house" should invest in something like this for their employees. 

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Bourbon Air Tours
30 minutes ago, FacePlant said:

I would wager that most who've been here for a while would pass the test easy. I admit that a few years back I did the dog and pony. Facts picked up at the time and not known by me, had more to do with Irish whiskey than any other material covered. They also covered Scotch and Canadian I think? Any bar or restaurant that holds itself out as a "bourbon house" should invest in something like this for their employees. 

Yep. They do offer kits for 'establishments' that include 10 sets of materials. It should be a no-brainer.

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