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Gillman

Seagram 7 Crown

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ratcheer
Delighted to read this, thanks for your comments, Tim. (I do feel too it drinks nicely on its own, maybe with a cube of ice).

Yes, my meager notes were based on tasting it straight - no mixer, no water, no ice. It was smooth and a little sweet, all by itself.

Tim

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Gillman

Well, it is fortuitous to have this discussion since I have just completed a "vertical" tasting of three Seagram 7 Crown whiskies.

The first ("No. 1") was (from) a half-gallon purchased in 1980.

The second ("No. 2") was a half-pint purchased in Florida in 2004.

The third ("No. 3") was a pint purchased this year in Las Vegas.

In my opinion, No. 1 was the best. It was the darkest (in and of itself not decisive) and had a bourbon-like sweetness and roundness that was most appealing.

No. 2 was my least favorite: rather lean, spirity, not bad certainly but not replete of taste.

No. 3 was rich-tasting but in a different way than No. 1, it was balanced and full-flavored but seemingly rye-inclined not bourbon-inclined. Applying my own terminology to them, I'd say No. 1 was "bourbon-recipe", No. 3 "rye-recipe", and No. 2 somewhat like No. 3 but not as good.

This is just my impression, but it abides.

Gary

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Gillman

Well here I am in Florida again, (and SB again, been too long), at the same condo I mentioned above, trying the same circa-1980 jug of Seagram Seven Crown. It is rich, sweetish, brandy-like but rye-edged.

 

Jug has no health warning, no reference to any percentage of grain neutral spirits, family here tells me was purchased early 80s.

 

Quite different imo to current Seven Crown with its sharp GNS edge.

 

Scott must be right, it must be, given the era, light whiskey from the 70s aged and put to use for this brand given the failure of the light whiskey category on its own. Possibly there is some straight rye in it from Lawrenceburg, hard to tell, but I think it may be all-light whiskey. Doesn't taste flavoured in any way (sugar, etc.).

 

It's a pity in many ways the light whiskey was abandoned because the result is really good. Not quite straight, not quite GNS, not quite Canadian. 

 

Gary

 

 

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Clueby
On 12/8/2018 at 8:50 PM, Gillman said:

Well here I am in Florida again, (and SB again, been too long), at the same condo I mentioned above, trying the same circa-1980 jug of Seagram Seven Crown. It is rich, sweetish, brandy-like but rye-edged.

 

Jug has no health warning, no reference to any percentage of grain neutral spirits, family here tells me was purchased early 80s.

 

Quite different imo to current Seven Crown with its sharp GNS edge.

 

Scott must be right, it must be, given the era, light whiskey from the 70s aged and put to use for this brand given the failure of the light whiskey category on its own. Possibly there is some straight rye in it from Lawrenceburg, hard to tell, but I think it may be all-light whiskey. Doesn't taste flavoured in any way (sugar, etc.).

 

It's a pity in many ways the light whiskey was abandoned because the result is really good. Not quite straight, not quite GNS, not quite Canadian. 

 

Gary

 

 

I've got a sealed 1971 bottle of 7 Crown.  1 Quart, 86 proof.  I should open it one of these days.  From all the comments in this thread, 1971 was before using light whiskey?  What was it before that? The bottle just says American Blended Whiskey.

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Gillman

Does it state a percentage of grain spirits on the label possibly...

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Clueby
12 hours ago, Gillman said:

Does it state a percentage of grain spirits on the label possibly...

It actually does state 65% gns.

20181213_080218-784x1613.jpg

20181213_080158-784x1613.jpg

20181213_080150-784x1613.jpg

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Gillman

Well, it may not be as good as the later one (mid-70s-mid-90s according to Scott), possibly, which I`m drinking now actually, a very interesting version of  Seagram 7 -  no GNS burn but not quite bourbon or straight rye either. Your bottle still might be very good though, I`d give it a try.

 

Gary

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tanstaafl2
On 12/8/2018 at 9:50 PM, Gillman said:

Well here I am in Florida again, (and SB again, been too long), at the same condo I mentioned above, trying the same circa-1980 jug of Seagram Seven Crown. It is rich, sweetish, brandy-like but rye-edged.

 

Jug has no health warning, no reference to any percentage of grain neutral spirits, family here tells me was purchased early 80s.

 

Quite different imo to current Seven Crown with its sharp GNS edge.

 

Scott must be right, it must be, given the era, light whiskey from the 70s aged and put to use for this brand given the failure of the light whiskey category on its own. Possibly there is some straight rye in it from Lawrenceburg, hard to tell, but I think it may be all-light whiskey. Doesn't taste flavoured in any way (sugar, etc.).

 

It's a pity in many ways the light whiskey was abandoned because the result is really good. Not quite straight, not quite GNS, not quite Canadian. 

 

Gary

 

 

Any grape jelly character??? :D

 

I have the 14yo light whiskey from MGP that David Perkins acquired while he still owned High West and I believe that was the flavor profile he noted (along with vanilla). My palate is not quite as well attuned to the grape character as David's! But still enjoyable all the same.

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Gillman

Hi Bruce. Not really, it's more light a light bourbon character. It might have some straight whiskey in it too, so hard to parse out the individual aspects, but I don't get any estery notes.

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