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Went for some Rye for a change


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I have no problem with them so long as they're labeled as blended whisky. Along with bulk Canadians I find them useful as a mixer for guests who don't care for a stronger whisky taste.

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Oh hey all, I see this thread has taken on quite a life of its own. Good thing I guess too! I am not around as often as I use to be it seems...

Opening them up is certainly one that I think does benefit, to some degree I try to swirl and aerate them in my glass sometimes, but sure why not. People talk about letting them stand.. etc..

I have other videos were I did cut the bourbons I was tasting with water which I discussed a little and found little nuances. I've also done that in the past myself with tastings as well. It does make a difference I agree, although I mention I always taste them right away. 4 seems to be about my limit.

Most of the reviews on the bourbons and I guess at this point the rye whiskeys are really very quick first impressions of them right out of the bottle. It probably doesn't make sense for me to sit there for 1/2 hour talking about one whiskey even with editing, perhaps that's a little boring. Dunno maybe not, I am not the only person who does this either. Everyone's got their own style.

The other point is to try the make the videos fun also to some extent and show the enjoyment of drink.

On a second note I am awaiting some Glencairn glasses on order to use in another bourbon tasting of BT, ER, EC12, and VWLotB [VWLotB was the bourbon that started it all for me] (HAH I went acronym on ya!). My current tasting glasses are very tapered and I was thinking they might make the alcohol a little too prominent.

I got a good deal on a set of 4 I think, but I was also concerned about it too cause I am a notorious klutz and I could see myself breaking these glasses (which is why I have about 9 simple small inexpensive snifters).

Well till then, thanks for more education on CDN whisky. Gonna have to nail down some Forty Creek perhaps ;)

Oh and Congrats Garry!

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minions9.jpgThomasH, harshest, T comp, dbk, GOCOUGS2002, Brisko, Imbibehour, ratcheer and sku.

35 posts in and I've made an impression as a sycophant already! Sweet.

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CorvallisCracker
35 posts in and I've made an impression as a sycophant already! Sweet.

Here at SB.com we stress quality over quantity. :lol:

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In terms of U.S. blends, I like Seagram 7 Crown, which is quite full-flavoured. I'm sure most don't drink it neat, but it tastes like a lighter straight rye to me.

I also like Barton's blends I find in Kentucky (I guess Tom Moore's now), some of which are reputed to have higher percentages of straight whiskey - I read that once somewhere. The thing too about those, admittedly not widely distributed I believe, is they have a "house" taste, a formula that gives them something distinctive. There is one that is sort of dates-like.

Then there is, also mostly a KY thing, the Bourbon - A Blend category, 51% bourbon the rest GNS.

I'd compare those favourably to the best Canadian whiskies.

Gary

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Virus_Of_Life

minions4.jpgChristian

Wait a minute! I seem to be missing something, oh yeah, an eye! Or is that my third eye there?

yeah, yeah off topic, I know.

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CorvallisCracker
Wait a minute! I seem to be missing something, oh yeah, an eye! Or is that my third eye there?

It's a special eye, for spotting Rye.

There we go. Back on topic!

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In terms of U.S. blends, I like Seagram 7 Crown, which is quite full-flavoured. I'm sure most don't drink it neat, but it tastes like a lighter straight rye to me.

I also like Barton's blends I find in Kentucky (I guess Tom Moore's now), some of which are reputed to have higher percentages of straight whiskey - I read that once somewhere. The thing too about those, admittedly not widely distributed I believe, is they have a "house" taste, a formula that gives them something distinctive. There is one that is sort of dates-like.

Then there is, also mostly a KY thing, the Bourbon - A Blend category, 51% bourbon the rest GNS.

I'd compare those favourably to the best Canadian whiskies.

Gary

They're constantly changing the recipes on these things and always in the direction of more GNS, less whiskey. There has been another burst of it in recent years because the supply of fully-aged whiskey has gotten so tight. Back when we were still in glut mode, whiskey content was as high as 40% in some of the main blends, including some of the Bartons, but they're probably no longer. At least the law requires the GNS percentage to be on the label. I always look. These days it seems like they're all right at 20% -- the legal minimum -- except S7, which is 25%.

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Barton Reserve is shown as 70% neutral spirits on the Barton website, the others (I only took at quick look) at 20%.

It is possible though too whomever was writing what I recall reading was referring also to the Bourbon - A Blend category, which are half bourbon. One of these is shown in the same (blended whiskey) part of the site.

As always, taste tests are needed, the next time in Kentucky I'll look for some and see how they stack up.

Gary

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Taste tests indeed Gary, you have piqued my interest in Barton blends, I'm confident I can find a few around here.

And no Chuck, I have no high expectations but am interested looking into American blends that in a highball might please my non whisky drinking social friends.

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Interested in blends? Make your own! Use good bourbon and good vodka and I guarantee you'll like the results better than anything you can buy. To approximate the typical American blend use four parts vodka to one part whiskey.

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Tried that with mixed results but I was looking for a richer taste profile. Now I would like to see what the professionals are doing.

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Tried that with mixed results but I was looking for a richer taste profile. Now I would like to see what the professionals are doing.

By all means. One thing they may do, like the Canadians and Scots, is use very strongly flavored whiskey since they know they're going to dilute it so much. That's why LDI makes a 95% rye whskey, as a flavoring whiskey for blends.

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  • 2 months later...
I get a slight hint of coco in the nose of Tangle Ridge which I believe is a 100% rye whisky. Does anyone else notice this?

I have not had the Tangle Ridge Canadian Whisky. Although it is made with a 100% rye mashbill (and aged 10 years), I believe that it is blended with a bit of sherry after the aging.

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