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BBQ.... what is your weapon of choice?


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The English call "grilling" BBQ'ing too and seem to have no concept of smoking meat for extended periods of time. To live life without slow-smoked ribs and pulled pork is hard for me to even fathom.

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Okay, cool. So do you need any special equipment for that? In Germany there is just grilling. BBQ is taken probably as the US version of grilling. Didn't knew that there is a difference. Thanks for the info!

To expand on the short post from my phone:

Grilling is for lean and/or tender cuts of meat and done with direct heat.

BBQ is for cheaper/tougher cuts that become more tender with long/slow cooking and is done with indirect heat.

Most of us here who BBQ/smoke have a dedicated smoker (a popular model among SB'ers is the Weber Smokey Mountain) and Josh uses an Alton Brown inspired home made "flower pot" smoker that probably looks like the one in that link.

A great site for learning about smoking/BBQ is the Virtual Weber Bullet. Lots of recipes and techniques there.

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Okay, cool. So do you need any special equipment for that? In Germany there is just grilling. BBQ is taken probably as the US version of grilling. Didn't knew that there is a difference. Thanks for the info!
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I cook with the attached outdoor kitchen. We've had it for two years and mostly grill steaks, sausages and chicken (Aussies typically refer to this as BBQ'ing). I've done a few roasts, and am hoping to utilise the rotisserie for the first time in the next few weeks. I'm also keen to attempt some slow smoking at some stage, but am not sure how to start :skep:

That's one heck of a setup, Cam. Wow.

I cooked a sirloin tip roast on the rotisserie yesterday and it came out great. Just a simple rub of garlic powder and seasoned salt and a couple hours spinning over the heat and it made for a tasty dinner (and leftovers).

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You can BBQ meats you can grill but you can't grill meat that you BBQ.....

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doubleblank

I have a buddy, Gregg (many of you have met him at prior gazebos), who moved to Perth about 5 years ago. He made up one of those "Alton Brown" flower pot smokers and got to bbqing stuff. His neighbors came over to see what he was up to since they smelled smoke coming from his backyard. They were amazed at the flavors from smoked meats/ribs/chicken/etc since, as we all know, their "bbq" is our "grill". He's one of the most popular guys in his neighborhood when it comes time for a large cook. He and his neighbors have since built a couple of UDSs for the neighborhood's collective use. Gregg has a local butcher he introduced to slow smoking and he now saves the briskets and beef ribs for smoking rather than making it into hamburger meat.

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I use a home build reverse flow smoker. Mainly use hickory logs I split and cut into 18" lengths but charcoal and wood chunks work well too. I smoked some spare ribs last weekend using the 3-2-1 method. Three hours in the smoke at about 230, two hours wrapped in foil, and one hour back in the smoke. I apply a little BBQ sauce during the last hour. The attached picture shows a slab after the two hour period.

smoker1.pdf

ribs1.pdf

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I use a home build reverse flow smoker. Mainly use hickory logs I split and cut into 18" lengths but charcoal and wood chunks work well too. I smoked some spare ribs last weekend using the 3-2-1 method. Three hours in the smoke at about 230, two hours wrapped in foil, and one hour back in the smoke. I apply a little BBQ sauce during the last hour. The attached picture shows a slab after the two hour period.

Nice home build!!! That is a pretty fat rack of St. Louis..... must have come out tasty!!!

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Nice home build!!! That is a pretty fat rack of St. Louis..... must have come out tasty!!!

Being a KCBS judge I am not surprised you noted the St. Louis trim on the ribs. I usually smoke the slabs without trimming but since I was cooking for my wife's friends I trimmed the ribs then cut into two rib portions to serve.

I happened to take pictures of my smoke last week so I could upload them to the smoking forum to which I subscribe.

ribs3.pdf

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Bourbon Boiler

Josh (or anyone else),

Do you soak the wood chips/chunks? I used to do this with wood chunks on top of regular coals in a grill. It would work great for a while, but if I was cooking something for more than an hour they would dry, then burn, and I'd lose temp control. I actually was using two grills for a while, always having one in temperature due to adding new, wet wood chunks. It worked, but wasn't worth the effort.

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I just graduated to the Yoder YS640 pellet grill this Spring. It is sooooooo nice. I BBQ'd with a WSM for years and liked it well enough but it always required attention and I never got the ribs "just right." The Yoder is expensive, but in this case you definitely get what you pay for. It has a commercial quality construction for the backyard BBQ'er. I'm still learning all the nuances (as with any new smoker) but my first two forays have exceeded my previous best 'Q. I'm not a big believer that the equipment is the whole reason for the success, but the temperature control was outstanding and consistent. You are basically using a wood fired oven. I'm looking forward to trying the charcoal pellets and working out the grilling kinks.

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Josh (or anyone else),

Do you soak the wood chips/chunks? I used to do this with wood chunks on top of regular coals in a grill. It would work great for a while, but if I was cooking something for more than an hour they would dry, then burn, and I'd lose temp control. I actually was using two grills for a while, always having one in temperature due to adding new, wet wood chunks. It worked, but wasn't worth the effort.

Don't bother soaking the wood. Use chunks because they burn longer. If you are really doing low and slow the smoke only penetrates for the first few hours. If you need to add more chunks, you can, but (like you stated) you have to deal with temp control. That is why the electric and propane smokers are so popular for non-competition enthusiasts. A cigar box sized amount of chunks should burn for 3-4 hours with no problem (unless you are using higher temps). Good luck...go Boilers!

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I only soak wood chips when I'm grilling. It keeps the chips from burning up right away. Like WsmataU said chunks work best for low and slow. I am too lazy to try and smoke things on the grill, too much work!

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Bourbon Boiler

Thanks to both of you for your responses. I'm getting hungry again.

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LongBeachScott

I got a 30" Masterbuilt Electric Smoker for Christmas last year. It's not terribly expensive and hols temperature very well.

http://www.masterbuilt.com/prod-smokers-analogue.html

Very simple to use. I live in Southern California so I can smoke year round. I can also get wood chips from citrus and nut growers for nothing. Recently I picked up bourbon barrel chips at a local hardware store.

So far, I have smoked whole chickens, ribs, tri-tip (a So Cal cut of beef, also called triangle steak), and pork tenderloin. Brisket is next. I am working my way up to Tea Smoked Duck! If I can find a meat slicer for cheap I will smoke my own bacon sometime.

Scott

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Very simple to use. I live in Southern California so I can smoke year round. I can also get wood chips from citrus and nut growers for nothing. Recently I picked up bourbon barrel chips at a local hardware store.

So far, I have smoked whole chickens, ribs, tri-tip (a So Cal cut of beef, also called triangle steak), and pork tenderloin. Brisket is next. I am working my way up to Tea Smoked Duck! If I can find a meat slicer for cheap I will smoke my own bacon sometime.

Scott

Great find on the bourbon barrel chips!

I've been wanting to smoke some duck, or at least duck breast, myself for a while, but grocery store prices for duck are outrageous. With all the hunters in this state, you'd think some would have a spare duck or two to throw my way for a reasonable price!

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I got a 30" Masterbuilt Electric Smoker for Christmas last year. It's not terribly expensive and hols temperature very well.

http://www.masterbuilt.com/prod-smokers-analogue.html

Very simple to use. I live in Southern California so I can smoke year round. I can also get wood chips from citrus and nut growers for nothing. Recently I picked up bourbon barrel chips at a local hardware store.

So far, I have smoked whole chickens, ribs, tri-tip (a So Cal cut of beef, also called triangle steak), and pork tenderloin. Brisket is next. I am working my way up to Tea Smoked Duck! If I can find a meat slicer for cheap I will smoke my own bacon sometime.

Scott

I've been using a 30" MES as well for the last 4 yrs or so. For a large brisket you can tent it or lay it over an inverted bowl to start and as it shrinks it will fit the rack.

This smoker has done a fine job for me over a few years. I keep meaning to upgrade but it's still going strong. Built a cold smoke generator that fits into the chip tray chute. Works like a charm.

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steeltownbbq

I'll be firing up my home built pit this weekend for 60# of butts, and a case of ribs. I'll be smoking some deer jerky in the upright cabinet too.

This thing will keep 225 for 12-16 hours with 10# GFS charcoal and wheelbarrow full of wood.

You would be safe in assuming that some bourbon and cigars will be consumed during the cooking.

Anyone hungry?

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Special Reserve
I'll be firing up my home built pit this weekend for 60# of butts, and a case of ribs. I'll be smoking some deer jerky in the upright cabinet too.

This thing will keep 225 for 12-16 hours with 10# GFS charcoal and wheelbarrow full of wood.

You would be safe in assuming that some bourbon and cigars will be consumed during the cooking.

Anyone hungry?

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I'll be firing up my home built pit this weekend for 60# of butts, and a case of ribs. I'll be smoking some deer jerky in the upright cabinet too.

This thing will keep 225 for 12-16 hours with 10# GFS charcoal and wheelbarrow full of wood.

You would be safe in assuming that some bourbon and cigars will be consumed during the cooking.

Anyone hungry?

Wow. That really does look great. I'd kill for a pulled pork sandwich right about now!

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  • 1 month later...

My smoker is a Diamond Plate Products Fat 50. I think the guy that built these smokers isn't in business any more but I could be wrong. I couldn't be happier with my smoker. To give you an idea how big it is, I can lay 60 racks of St. Louis cut ribs flat on my beast.

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  • 5 weeks later...
steeltownbbq

Question for you BBQ'rs... no one talks about it, but it has to be done sometime - cleaning and rust repair

Any tips? I use Krud Kutter for the grease and a pressure washer or the quarter car wash. I haven't found a high temp paint that I feel works real well on the rust

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Question for you BBQ'rs... no one talks about it, but it has to be done sometime - cleaning and rust repair

Any tips? I use Krud Kutter for the grease and a pressure washer or the quarter car wash. I haven't found a high temp paint that I feel works real well on the rust

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