Jump to content

Federalist 12?


Tony Santana
This topic has been inactive for at least 365 days, and is now closed. Please feel free to start a new thread on the subject! 

Recommended Posts

Tony Santana

I've seen this new offering from Journeyman Distillery pop up in a couple of stores now. At around $43 I haven't pulled the trigger yet, just wondering if anyone else has tried this yet and what they think. I had some of their bourbon and was less than impressed, but have a vague recollection of someone saying they liked one of the rye offerings. Supposedly the same recipe used by George Washington when he ran a distillery at Mt. Vernon, which is probably BS since I understand no records survive that accurately show what GW's mashbill was (and it likely changed depending on available grains anyway).

Link to post
Share on other sites

GW's recipe was created by his Scottish born distiller and was approximately 60% rye, 30% corn and 10% barley. Almost the same as the original Old Overholt mashbill and countless others who had learned by trial and error these proportions work out well to get the best qualities of the selected grains. I was under the impression Washington wrote down the recipe and his original note is on display at Mt. Vernon. Tom McKenzie would know, perhaps he could chime in.

My limited research hasn't turned up any tasting notes on the Federalist 12 Rye though, just the florid story put out by the distillery. Do they source it or make it themselves?

Link to post
Share on other sites
I've seen this new offering from Journeyman Distillery pop up in a couple of stores now. At around $43 I haven't pulled the trigger yet, just wondering if anyone else has tried this yet and what they think. I had some of their bourbon and was less than impressed, but have a vague recollection of someone saying they liked one of the rye offerings. Supposedly the same recipe used by George Washington when he ran a distillery at Mt. Vernon, which is probably BS since I understand no records survive that accurately show what GW's mashbill was (and it likely changed depending on available grains anyway).

I know almost nothing about it and never tried it but the number 12 on the label certainly provides no clue to the whiskey. It is most certainly not 12 years old (The distillery has only been around since 2011). 12 months is probably pushing it! Named for Hamilton's Federalist Essay Number 12 on whiskey tax. Mid $40's seems spendy. Hell, mid $20's seems spendy.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Lost Pollito

Had a taste a few weeks ago. I really enjoyed it. I think they are really making nice whiskey at Journeyman. Big fat round spice in this one. Did not take notes, so that's just the overall impression I had.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Harry in WashDC

The unaged rye whiskey made at the reconstructed still at GW's Mount Vernon supposedly is made following GW's own recipe (see below). The original distillery was open for about a year before GW's death in 1799 and continued to operate somewhat until a fire destroyed it n 1814. Dave Pickerell, formerly of MM, worked on the project starting in 2009. Here's a link to recent Washington Post articles on the distillery. Incidentally, the whiskey is truly "handmade" with almost everything being done by hand - from cutting wood for the fire to filling and emptying the still. No electricity helps them out (if the stories are to be believed).

http://www.washingtonpost.com/lifestyle/style/making-whiskey-at-george-washingtons-distillery/2013/03/27/3f6dc1b0-9189-11e2-9cfd-36d6c9b5d7ad_story.html

http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/reliable-source/wp/2014/10/15/this-is-what-a-32000-bottle-of-whiskey-looks-like/

Here's some specific info on the recipe, a few tasting notes, and the price at the Mt. Vernon giftshop with a link to the full article below it.

"After retiring from public life, Washington was the largest whiskey producer in the country, with the copper stills near Mount Vernon's gristmill producing more than 11,000 gallons of rye at the distillery's peak. George Washington's Gristmill and Distillery reopened in 2007 after a lengthy restoration project, and its stills now produce small batches of whiskey made to Washington's original recipe (60 percent rye, 35 percent corn, 5 percent malted barley) in equipment similar to 18th-century originals and aged in charred oak barrels on the estate for two years.

The whiskey is sold a few times a year to raise money for Mount Vernon's educational programs. Six hundred bottles will go on sale at the distillery and at Mount Vernon's main gift shop tomorrow, but this isn't something you pick up to bring to a cookout: A 375mL bottle will set you back $185. "

http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/going-out-guide/wp/2013/07/03/at-mount-vernon-tomorrow-whiskey-and-fireworks/

Link to post
Share on other sites

My wife and I will be in DC next week, and planning a trip to Mt. Vernon where I was hoping to buy some of the whiskey they make there. This thread just put a serious hurt on that :lol: I do love history, and the chance to taste a truly "craft" whiskey like that is tempting, but not at that price.

Link to post
Share on other sites
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.