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Gillman

Getting To The Bottom Of The Lincoln County Process

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Gillman

I thought this new post of mine would interest those who would like to learn more about the famous Jack Daniel's and George Dickel Lincoln County Process. To get a fuller story, read my earlier posting on the 1908 study of the Process, linked in the opening paragraphs. To get the fullest story, read the 1908 article itself, linked in that earlier posting.

 

http://www.beeretseq.com/the-evolution-of-lincoln-county-whiskey/

 

The net is, by the late 1800s, Lincoln County whiskey, albeit using a filtering process far from unique to the original Lincoln County, acquired a high reputation for quality even though it was (then) little aged. Since Jack Daniel's version, even in 1900, was red-coloured and clearly fully-aged, it may be that Jack Daniel's sold different qualities and indeed an 1886 source I cite suggests this. In the event, only fully-aged Jack Daniel's and George Dickel became, in the 1900s at any rate, regarded as "the" Lincoln County whiskey. The older, unaged version, despite being highly regarded at one time, disappeared (until recently when Jack Daniel's released its unaged rye and perhaps now craft distilling in Tennessee is releasing whiskeys also subjected to maple charcoal filtration but not barrelled and aged for years in the warehouse).

 

One point not addressed in my article is, perhaps the distinctiveness of the Lincoln County Process resided, not in locals being unaware similar charcoal filtration was used elsewhere in the mid-1800s (e.g. Toronto) and in the dying out of the process elsewhere, but that maple charcoal wood was used in Lincoln County vs. other types of wood. From what I've read, many different types of wood were used in charcoal filter tubs, perhaps Lincoln County settled on maple and other places did not...

 

Gary

Edited by Gillman

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ratcheer

Excellent research, Gary. Thank you.

 

Tim

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Gillman

Thanks Tim, by the way in Harrison Hall's early texts on distilling, he gives detailed instructions to make a vat of maple, or walnut, charcoal. He states that since its use to rectify spirits, no other means is needed. It can be seen the Lincoln County method was simply an application of an idea current since the early 1800s, Harrison was writing in 1813-1818. He was based in Pennsylvania with no connection to Tennessee I can see, earlier he resided in New Jersey.  I will have a posting soon on Robertson County whiskey, I've found more about it.

 

Gary

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Harry in WashDC

Having trouble keeping up with all this great info you keep finding, Gary.  When is your book coming out so I don't have to keep Binging and Googling?:D

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Gillman

Thanks Harry! One thing I enjoy more than anything is peoples' comments yet there have been relatively few for some reason... don't be shy.

 

Gary

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flahute

Gary, I'd be prone to commenting more if my head wasn't swimming so much in all this info. I'm truly enjoying it and am taking it all in. I do tend to geek out on history and technical info that explains these things. Please keep it coming. 

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