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Pikesvilke Rye for Manhattan or neat?


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1 hour ago, BigPapa said:

Is Pikesvilke Rye too good to make Manhattan's out of or should it only be drunk near?

 

what do you do?

IMHO, no readily available rye is too good for a Manhattan.  The secret is to mix the right vermouth in the right ratio with rye so that the character of the rye comes through.  You want the rye to be the dominant taste, and the better the rye, the better the taste.  

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5 hours ago, Madhatter said:

IMHO, no readily available rye is too good for a Manhattan.  The secret is to mix the right vermouth in the right ratio with rye so that the character of the rye comes through.  You want the rye to be the dominant taste, and the better the rye, the better the taste.  

What do you use?

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2 hours ago, BigPapa said:

What do you use?

My vermouth pref is cocchi di torino.   I like its brightness and sharply etched flavor.   And it comes in small bottles.  But [and this is a big but] I use less vermouth than the usual rec of rye 2 parts : vermouth 1 part.  The cocchi is so intense that it could overwhelm, and remember what I said above making sure the rye is the dominant taste.

 

When I'm traveling the grocery store Martini & Rossi is a perfectly good substitute.  

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It is also extremely helpful to be sure your vermouth stays fresh. Too many people open a bottle of vermouth to use some and then close it and leave it on the counter for weeks or even months. It is a wine based product and it will go bad sooner rather than later. Stale vermouth will kill a Manhattan, not matter what rye you use.

 

I keep mine refrigerated and use a Vacuvin stopper to take as much air out as possible (I do this for most any aromatized wine based product like Cocchi Americano, Bonal or Lillet as well as sweet and dry vermouths).  Even then I try to use it up in a few weeks at most.

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On 10/23/2016 at 4:56 PM, Madhatter said:

My vermouth pref is cocchi di torino.   I like its brightness and sharply etched flavor.   And it comes in small bottles.  But [and this is a big but] I use less vermouth than the usual rec of rye 2 parts : vermouth 1 part.  The cocchi is so intense that it could overwhelm, and remember what I said above making sure the rye is the dominant taste.

 

When I'm traveling the grocery store Martini & Rossi is a perfectly good substitute.  

I use Compano Antica. Love that vermouth 

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No better vermouth to me than Vya. They confirmed to me that their sweet formula is natural color - apparently most others use caramel color.

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  • 1 month later...

I'm another Cocchi Vermouth di Turin fan.  Goes well with Ritt or Baby Saz. 

 

And I also add a bit of maple syrup to my cocktails, because it's winter now in New England..

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  • 3 weeks later...
FlounderinDC

I have never put Pikesville in a Manhattan. I think it is fantastic neat and currently one of my favorite whiskeys, although I bet it would be great in a cocktail.
I opened a bottle last night and just was enamored with it. Strong but not overpowering and good rye spice.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Off topic: Unfortunately there's been a run on Pikesville 110/6yr in my area, so I can't get any of it right now.  It's unfortunate because I've been able to count on it being on shelves constantly since it came out.  The next bottle or two I purchase will be drunk neat, and likely sparingly in case this happens again.

 

On topic: If it's readily available in your area, it doesn't appeal to you neat, or you just want to make a really nice cocktail, I say go for it.  It is your whiskey.  As the other posters have said, just make sure all the other ingredients in your cocktails are of similar quality.

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6 hours ago, garbanzobean said:

Off topic: Unfortunately there's been a run on Pikesville 110/6yr in my area, so I can't get any of it right now.  It's unfortunate because I've been able to count on it being on shelves constantly since it came out.  The next bottle or two I purchase will be drunk neat, and likely sparingly in case this happens again.

 

On topic: If it's readily available in your area, it doesn't appeal to you neat, or you just want to make a really nice cocktail, I say go for it.  It is your whiskey.  As the other posters have said, just make sure all the other ingredients in your cocktails are of similar quality.

Eric,

 

I'm not sure how close VA is to you, but I see a decent amount of it on the VA ABC website.

 

Joe

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1 hour ago, JoeTerp said:

Eric,

 

I'm not sure how close VA is to you, but I see a decent amount of it on the VA ABC website.

 

Joe

Thanks for the heads up Joe.

 

I am going to check MoCo ABC next week.  Their website is listing it as in stock, but that may change.

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Eric -

 

I've seen it very recently on rt. 40 in at least three stores. I know you go there too, so maybe all gone? I'm due to buy another in the next few weeks or so. 

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The Black Tot

After all, we used to put Rittenhouse in everything!

 

Pikesville is just Rittenhouse with a few more years and a few more proof, to keep the Manhattan stiff!!!

 

Definitely go for it.

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The Black Tot
On 10/24/2016 at 6:24 PM, tanstaafl2 said:

It is also extremely helpful to be sure your vermouth stays fresh. Too many people open a bottle of vermouth to use some and then close it and leave it on the counter for weeks or even months. It is a wine based product and it will go bad sooner rather than later. Stale vermouth will kill a Manhattan, not matter what rye you use.

 

I keep mine refrigerated and use a Vacuvin stopper to take as much air out as possible (I do this for most any aromatized wine based product like Cocchi Americano, Bonal or Lillet as well as sweet and dry vermouths).  Even then I try to use it up in a few weeks at most.

 

Excellent point. I'm guilty of the too long between uses. I'm starting over when I get to land next, and I'm going to break the new bottle of vermouth up into several sample bottles with no air room, to keep everything fresh and flexible.

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