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jbutler

Need a Still?

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jbutler

Here you go. I find this interesting, but also remember that in the 70's it was perfectly legal to buy a bong ... as long as you didn't use it.

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Harry in WashDC

Hhhhhm.  They are cute. 

 

Now, here is where I provide some info and AM NOT providing professional legal advice.  For the obsessive crowd, here is a link to the Treas. Dept's Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau (TTB) page summarizing laws governing home distilling.  https://www.ttb.gov/spirits/home-distilling.shtml

 

Note that the TTB's page says that section 5601(a)(1) of the Internal Revenue Code makes it a crime to possess an unregistered still.  So, one may reasonably ask, "How do I register one if I buy one?"   Well, the TTB page summarizes that section but doesn't contain ALL the section's info.  The actual section says it is a crime for a person to have ". . . in his possession or custody, or under his control, any still or distilling apparatus set up which is not registered, as required by section 5179(a) . . ."  OK, then, what does section 5179(a) says about registering?  It says this:  "Every person having in his possession or custody, or under his control, any still or distilling apparatus set up, shall register such still or apparatus with the Secretary immediately on its being set up, by subscribing and filing with the Secretary a statement, in writing, setting forth the particular place where such still or distilling apparatus is set up, the kind of still and its capacity, the owner thereof, his place of residence, and the purpose for which said still or distilling apparatus has been or is intended to be used (except that stills or distilling apparatus not used or intended to be used for the distillation, redistillation, or recovery of distilled spirits are not required to be registered under this section)."

 

NOTE WELL that last parenthetical; if all you are going to do with it is let it sit there AND have no intention of firing it up for the purpose of distilling, redistilling, or spirit recovery, then you don't have to register it.

 

Be sure to check out the official definition of "distilled spirits"; the still, apparently, could be used for the distillation, redistillation, or recovery of stuff that does NOT fall under the definition of "distilled spirits".  But, I betcha anything consumable, directly or indirectly, is one.

 

Don't rely on this info which is NOT advice notwithstanding I believe it is true and correct as far as it goes.

 

 

 

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chappy6107
2 hours ago, Harry in WashDC said:

Hhhhhm.  They are cute. 

 

Now, here is where I provide some info and AM NOT providing professional legal advice.  For the obsessive crowd, here is a link to the Treas. Dept's Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau (TTB) page summarizing laws governing home distilling.  https://www.ttb.gov/spirits/home-distilling.shtml

 

Note that the TTB's page says that section 5601(a)(1) of the Internal Revenue Code makes it a crime to possess an unregistered still.  So, one may reasonably ask, "How do I register one if I buy one?"   Well, the TTB page summarizes that section but doesn't contain ALL the section's info.  The actual section says it is a crime for a person to have ". . . in his possession or custody, or under his control, any still or distilling apparatus set up which is not registered, as required by section 5179(a) . . ."  OK, then, what does section 5179(a) says about registering?  It says this:  "Every person having in his possession or custody, or under his control, any still or distilling apparatus set up, shall register such still or apparatus with the Secretary immediately on its being set up, by subscribing and filing with the Secretary a statement, in writing, setting forth the particular place where such still or distilling apparatus is set up, the kind of still and its capacity, the owner thereof, his place of residence, and the purpose for which said still or distilling apparatus has been or is intended to be used (except that stills or distilling apparatus not used or intended to be used for the distillation, redistillation, or recovery of distilled spirits are not required to be registered under this section)."

 

NOTE WELL that last parenthetical; if all you are going to do with it is let it sit there AND have no intention of firing it up for the purpose of distilling, redistilling, or spirit recovery, then you don't have to register it.

 

Be sure to check out the official definition of "distilled spirits"; the still, apparently, could be used for the distillation, redistillation, or recovery of stuff that does NOT fall under the definition of "distilled spirits".  But, I betcha anything consumable, directly or indirectly, is one.

 

Don't rely on this info which is NOT advice notwithstanding I believe it is true and correct as far as it goes.

 

 

 

I guess this means if you only want to make distilled water instead of buying it from the store, you are good

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Harry in WashDC
1 hour ago, chappy6107 said:

I guess this means if you only want to make distilled water instead of buying it from the store, you are good

I concur about the water.  I should have written, "But, I betcha anything consumable and distilled in it that ends up with an alcohol content probably is a "distilled spirit."  The TTB website does have a long, descriptive document  called "Standards for Distilled Spirits" that narratively walks the reader through the types of distilled spirits.

 

Nice catch, chappy.

Edited by Harry in WashDC
add more qualifications, like "and distilled in it"

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