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Remus Repeal Reserve Series 3

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gurgalunas

Went to a MGP tasting at the LS last night, primarily featuring Rossville Union Rye lineup, but we finished with the Remus Repeal Reserve Series 2 and Series 3 (being released shortly).  At $85, the Reserve series is in a funny position to me.  Yes, its solid MGP, in the 12ish yr range, but not MGP of 4-5 years ago.  At $85, it's worth trying a free pour at this and last years tasting, but I havent rushed out to buy a bottle.

 

Seems like this would be nothing special to report, at least until we tried the Series 3.  This new release features a prominent orange peel note.  I immediately thought of 2018 Parkers Heritage, but this flavor was much more forward than the orange curacao finished whiskey.  I mean, think old fashioned with an orange peel expressed over the top.  And the amazing part is that it's a natural flavor imparted by the original barrel.  Sure, they selected barrels that highlighted the citrus note, but no finish or flavoring was used to achieve the results. 

 

Some hated it, some loved it, I was just baffled by the range of unique flavors a barrel could impart on the spirit.  I bought one... 

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flahute
On 10/30/2019 at 7:26 PM, gurgalunas said:

Went to a MGP tasting at the LS last night, primarily featuring Rossville Union Rye lineup, but we finished with the Remus Repeal Reserve Series 2 and Series 3 (being released shortly).  At $85, the Reserve series is in a funny position to me.  Yes, its solid MGP, in the 12ish yr range, but not MGP of 4-5 years ago.  At $85, it's worth trying a free pour at this and last years tasting, but I havent rushed out to buy a bottle.

 

Seems like this would be nothing special to report, at least until we tried the Series 3.  This new release features a prominent orange peel note.  I immediately thought of 2018 Parkers Heritage, but this flavor was much more forward than the orange curacao finished whiskey.  I mean, think old fashioned with an orange peel expressed over the top.  And the amazing part is that it's a natural flavor imparted by the original barrel.  Sure, they selected barrels that highlighted the citrus note, but no finish or flavoring was used to achieve the results. 

 

Some hated it, some loved it, I was just baffled by the range of unique flavors a barrel could impart on the spirit.  I bought one... 

This sounds very interesting indeed. Thanks for the report. 

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EarthQuake

Very interesting indeed. I will probably pick one up when I see it.

 

I seem to be one of the few who really like the Remus Reserve line, at least the Seres 2 (didn't try series 1). I liked it so much that I bought another after I killed the first. But I think both were on sale for closer to $70. These tend to sit on the shelf here - It's sort of amusing that Boone County 12 flies off the shelves at a similar price / proof / age but MGP can't manage to sell their own stuff.

Edited by EarthQuake
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Jazzhead

The Remus Reserve is excellent.   It won't,  I believe, be available in Pennsylvania,  and picking up bottles (both Series 1 and 2) has been a highlight of recent travels. 

 

I am a huge proponent of what careful blending can do to produce top-notch bourbon.    That's what MGP has done here, as well as with its former, and also excellent,  product Metze's Select.   I cracked open this weekend the new Little Book, Chapter 3, and was immediately reminded of the bliss I recalled from my long-dead Remus Reserve bottles.   (Little Book, Chapter 3 is a blending of extra-aged Beam bourbons, just as RR is extra-aged MGP bourbons, both high and low-rye recipes.   The major difference is that RR is bottled at a "normal" proof,  whereas the Little Book is cask strength.)

 

Trying the Little Book side by side with Bookers makes for an interesting case study in just what blending brings to the table.    Both were excellent pours, and with obvious familial similarities, but there are differences.    Simply stated,  Booker's punches, while Little Book beguiles.    To employ another metaphor, Little Book's blending of compatible,  extra-aged bourbons makes the journey from start to finish as smooth and exhilarating as a steel roller coaster,  as compared with the intense, wild ride of a wooden coaster that is full-strength Bookers.

 

The Remus Reserve is no head-chopper;   it's a balanced expression of the best that MGP makes.   If I can find it,  I'll gladly buy Series III,  including an extra bottle to bunker.  

 

To me, what RR and LB Chapter 3 are doing is where the future may lie.   Neither is cheap,  but each is worth the price charged.   Given the dubious nature of some of what's being marketed out there for $100 bucks a pop,  I can unreservedly recommend these two to anyone lucky enough to run across them.        

Edited by Jazzhead
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gurgalunas

Honestly, I'd buy one and try it first.  The orange note is VERY forward.  Bite an orange peel and take a sip of bourbon...  enjoyable, IMO, due to its unique place in bourbon options, being a truly natural flavor, but potent nonetheless...

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RWBadley

Interesting. I have come to associate that orange note with higher rye recipe, similar to some of the older baby Saz rye which sometimes had quite a bit of orange peel. Is this Remus Repeal Reserve 3 a rye in fact? or some sort of  'we're not sure'? blend

Edited by RWBadley

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gurgalunas
5 hours ago, RWBadley said:

Interesting. I have come to associate that orange note with higher rye recipe, similar to some of the older baby Saz rye which sometimes had quite a bit of orange peel. Is this Remus Repeal Reserve 3 a rye in fact? or some sort of  'we're not sure'? blend

No, its MGP bourbon for sure.  IIRC, its 11-12 yr old.  Specific mash and ages are listed on the bottle I think.

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EarthQuake

It's a blend of MGPs two bourbon rye mash bills, low (high) rye (21%) and high (higher) rye (36%). MGP has the same bourbon mash bills as Four Roses, which dates back to MGP being Seagrams, which used to own the Four Roses brand.

 

In this case it's 12% 12 year old 21% rye mash, 10% 11 year old 36% rye mash, and 78% 11 year old 21% rye mash.

 

MGP does a great job of telling you exactly what is in these releases, which I appreciate. It would be neat if Four Roses told us what proportions go into the Small Batch LE.

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