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StarSurfer55

I have grown interested in the products from the Texas Distilleries such as Balcones and TX. I have only had the Rumble and Baby Blue from Balcones and, more recently, the TX blended whiskey.  The TX is real vanilla bomb to me and I like it except for the proof point of 82.  I am a bit surprise that the amount of barrel color you can get from a whiskey in texas in a short time.  That heat really brings on the color.  However, my knowledge fo the texas distilleries is limited and I thought I would ask if others had recommendations for their products.

 

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On 4/8/2021 at 6:18 PM, StarSurfer55 said:

However, my knowledge fo the texas distilleries is limited and I thought I would ask if others had recommendations for their products.

 

 

The crickets on this topic are probably pretty telling.  I'm not saying, but I'm just saying...

 

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Texans will tell you how great it is like they take pride in everything else. 😀I was born and raised in NTX.  I have friends that get excited to win lotteries for 5 year old whiskey.  I’m sure there is good whiskey down there but I would be hesitant to buy. 

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smokinjoe

Where is Chip Tate...

 

Ive seen neither hide nor hair of him in years...

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LCWoody

The problem with TX. "whiskey" is they market it as bourbon.... TX. distilled bourbon taste nothing like bourbon, in how you think about the taste of traditional bourbon. I think the "TX. bourbon industry" would have been accepted better by drinkers if drinkers didn't go into it thinking you were drinking bourbon. I've had some great whiskey and Ryes from several different TX. distillers, but none, I mean none tasted like bourbon. I think that if the pioneers of the TX. whiskey industry would have owned this "bourbon" whiskey under another name, "Real TX. Tea", ( I know thats stupid ) but something, it would be a much more excepted and a much bigger industry for TX.  It would be something different that Texas could own, as their own. TX. distillers has some really good juice, its just not bourbon. 

 

I'm sure this rant has some bad vibes with some, but its true, to me anyway.  

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flahute
1 hour ago, LCWoody said:

The problem with TX. "whiskey" is they market it as bourbon.... TX. distilled bourbon taste nothing like bourbon, in how you think about the taste of traditional bourbon. I think the "TX. bourbon industry" would have been accepted better by drinkers if drinkers didn't go into it thinking you were drinking bourbon. I've had some great whiskey and Ryes from several different TX. distillers, but none, I mean none tasted like bourbon. I think that if the pioneers of the TX. whiskey industry would have owned this "bourbon" whiskey under another name, "Real TX. Tea", ( I know thats stupid ) but something, it would be a much more excepted and a much bigger industry for TX.  It would be something different that Texas could own, as their own. TX. distillers has some really good juice, its just not bourbon. 

 

I'm sure this rant has some bad vibes with some, but its true, to me anyway.  

Rant away! Thanks for your perspective. I've not tried any of the TX whiskies because they are so damn expensive. Not going to take a chance on something I've heard so many bad things about.

Interesting to hear you say that it can be good, but that it doesn't taste like bourbon.

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ScottEP

I'm new here but thought I might be able to contribute a little here being that I'm a native Texan and still live here. The previous comment about Texas bourbon not tasting like bourbon is a little unfair. Bourbon made in Texas SHOULDN'T taste like bourbon made in Kentucky. Just like an Islay single malt Scotch shouldn't taste like a Highland single malt Scotch. The water, grain, and climate are all different so the end product is going to be different as well. Hopefully, as more bourbons from outside of Kentucky gain in popularity (Woodinville, Old Elk, Spirit of French Lick, Hudson, etc) the acceptance of this variation in flavor will be appreciated instead of viewed as a flaw.

 

With that said, I would suggest checking out Ironroot Harbinger for a gateway into Texas Bourbon. There's a reason it's won a couple very prestigious awards. They have pretty good distribution so hopefully you'll be able to find it. 

 

Outside of the bourbon category, check out Lone Elm's straight wheat whiskey and Giant single barrel rye from Gulf Coast Distillery.

 

Cheers!

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LCWoody
21 hours ago, ScottEP said:

I'm new here but thought I might be able to contribute a little here being that I'm a native Texan and still live here. The previous comment about Texas bourbon not tasting like bourbon is a little unfair. Bourbon made in Texas SHOULDN'T taste like bourbon made in Kentucky. Just like an Islay single malt Scotch shouldn't taste like a Highland single malt Scotch. The water, grain, and climate are all different so the end product is going to be different as well. Hopefully, as more bourbons from outside of Kentucky gain in popularity (Woodinville, Old Elk, Spirit of French Lick, Hudson, etc) the acceptance of this variation in flavor will be appreciated instead of viewed as a flaw.

 

With that said, I would suggest checking out Ironroot Harbinger for a gateway into Texas Bourbon. There's a reason it's won a couple very prestigious awards. They have pretty good distribution so hopefully you'll be able to find it. 

 

Outside of the bourbon category, check out Lone Elm's straight wheat whiskey and Giant single barrel rye from Gulf Coast Distillery.

 

Cheers!

You have made my point even better than I, except the flaw part. TX. bourbon is by no means a flaw. The only flaw that I see in your examples is Hudson. If there was ever a bourbon flaw, its Hudson 🤮

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smokinjoe

I can’t say I’ve enjoyed much from “Texas” bourbons, but recent posts here have some merit to them.  But, I do believe that the aging climate in Texas does create flaws in “bourbon” that goes beyond terroir differences, and this coupled with plain distilling faults in these crafts just compound the problems.  Whether these differences can be refined and become acceptable to those who have an expectation to what is “good” bourbon remains to be seen.  For me, it does not.  That said, I found Garrison bourbons for instance, to be horrific for most of its existence, but I admit that some recent tries to be better.  As in most things, time and experience will tell.  I totally would like the concept of a “Texas made” bourbon to carve out a quality space, but for me those producers still have a long way to go.  

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I've always thought these newer companies should offer their products in 50ml bottles as an option.  

Also, the small barrel short aging craft thing is a non starter for me.

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2 hours ago, PaulO said:

I've always thought these newer companies should offer their products in 50ml bottles as an option.  

 

If they did that, they would never sell a full size bottle at $75.00 and they'd go out of business immediately 🤫

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On 4/15/2021 at 8:35 PM, ScottEP said:

I'm new here but thought I might be able to contribute a little here being that I'm a native Texan and still live here. The previous comment about Texas bourbon not tasting like bourbon is a little unfair. Bourbon made in Texas SHOULDN'T taste like bourbon made in Kentucky. Just like an Islay single malt Scotch shouldn't taste like a Highland single malt Scotch. The water, grain, and climate are all different so the end product is going to be different as well. Hopefully, as more bourbons from outside of Kentucky gain in popularity (Woodinville, Old Elk, Spirit of French Lick, Hudson, etc) the acceptance of this variation in flavor will be appreciated instead of viewed as a flaw.

 

With that said, I would suggest checking out Ironroot Harbinger for a gateway into Texas Bourbon. There's a reason it's won a couple very prestigious awards. They have pretty good distribution so hopefully you'll be able to find it. 

 

Outside of the bourbon category, check out Lone Elm's straight wheat whiskey and Giant single barrel rye from Gulf Coast Distillery.

 

Cheers!

I'm glad you brought this up.  I also live in Texas and have for almost 20 years. I've never tasted a bourbon actually made in Texas for under $50 dollars that was as good as common everyday mass-produced stuff from Kentucky that I can buy for $25.  Even the better value ones at $35 to 40 have serious shortcomings (like young corn flavors) that I wouldn't normally accept from a good KSBW for anything over 20 bucks.

 

I don't waste my money anymore. There's no reason to pay more for a bourbon just because it happens to come from a particular state.  That's just plain silly.

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DeepCover

I’m not going to say I’ve sworn off Texas bourbon, but going forward I’ll absolutely need to try before I buy. Garrison Bros. tastes too young and corn-forward. Ranger Creek tastes like soy sauce. TX Bourbon tastes like cardboard. I’m done taking risk when I can buy a bottle of BT for $23.

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9 hours ago, DeepCover said:

I’m not going to say I’ve sworn off Texas bourbon, but going forward I’ll absolutely need to try before I buy. Garrison Bros. tastes too young and corn-forward. Ranger Creek tastes like soy sauce. TX Bourbon tastes like cardboard. I’m done taking risk when I can buy a bottle of BT for $23.

Ranger Creek is my current attempt at adding a Texas bourbon to my bar, and every time I try it I think, "this tastes familiar, but I can't place it."  Maybe it's soy sauce because you are dead on about Garrison and F&R's TX.  (I had homed in on a chocolatey note for Ranger Creek.)

 

 

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Creek Wolf

I just had a sampling of Devils River. It is very very young, less than average, weak in flavor, but big in price. Shouldn’t be named after such a great river.

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