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Dangermonkey

Old Overholt 1810

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Dangermonkey

I just laid my hands on a bottle of Old Overholt 1810 ( very ornate Bottle with some sort of Seal on the front at the shoulder). Anyone know anything about it?

I believe it is a Michters Pot distilled but I don't know the age ( of the Rye), or the age of the bottle.

Thanks,

Dangermonkey

The Pleasures of Exile are Imperfect at Best, At Worst They Rot the Liver

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cowdery

The Old Overholt brand is owned by Jim Beam Brands Co. and I have no reason to believe they own any of the old Michter's whiskey. More likely than not this is simply a "better" version of the rye they make at their Kentucky distilleries and bottle as Old Overholt and Jim Beam Rye.

- chuck

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Dangermonkey

Hello again,

Got the bottle in front of me now...

Marked distilled in Pennsylvania in 2 places.

Label on back says:

OVERHOLT "1810"

STRAIGHT RYE WHISKEY

93 PROOF 4/5 QUART

DISTILLED IN PENNSYLVANIA

Front Label says ( At Bottom)

Bottled by A.Overholt & Co. In Elmwood Place Ohio---- Distilled in Pennsylvania

Bottle appears to be at least 1960's.

Yes it is full and sealed. And yes I will share.

Regards,

Dangermonkey

The Pleasures of Exile are Imperfect at Best, At Worst They Rot the Liver

post-9-1448981102978_thumb.jpg

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Dangermonkey

see attached Photo of bottle.

The Pleasures of Exile are Imperfect at Best, At Worst They Rot the Liver

post-9-14489811029918_thumb.jpg

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gaijim

test

Regards,

Jim Butler

Straightbourbon.com Staff

post-39-14489811030033_thumb.jpg

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Dangermonkey

Her is another attempt at sending the Photo of the Old Overholt.

The Pleasures of Exile are Imperfect at Best, At Worst They Rot the Liver

post-9-14489811030136_thumb.jpg

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jbutler

Chris,

Did you pick the bottle up in a liquor store? It looks Intriguing.

You'll share? Hell, it's only about 3K miles, I'll be right over.

Regards,

Jim Butler

StraightBourbon.com

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cowdery

Dangermonkey,

Sorry about that. It didn't occur to me that this might be a leftover from the National Distillers days, when they were trucking the whiskey in from Pennsylvania and bottling it at their plant near Cincinnati.

On a related subject, I have a couple bottles of Michter's Original Sour Mash Whiskey stashed away, that I found in a liquor store in a Chicago suburb, along with some "real" Old Taylor (i.e., made at the actual Old Taylor Distillery prior to its closing in 1972). I opened one of the Michter's bottles and it was nothing special, but interesting. The label says, "Distillery established 1753, decanted and bottled by Michters Jug House, Pot Still, 86 proof, Schaefferstown, Lebanon County, PA."

- chuck

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Guest **DONOTDELETE**

I found a bottle of Michter's today with the same label for $ 15 while brousing a liquor store on the 'other side of the tracks'. Very dark whiskey. Pleasant rye bite up front with a touch of sweetness in the aftertaste. Several interesting flavors in there somewhere. I could live with this stuff if the premium's were not available. Helps round out the collection. Deserves further study.

Mark A. Mason, El Dorado, Arkansas

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cowdery

Because whiskey doesn't change in the bottle, it's not unusual for a small, neighborhood liquor store that's been in business a long time to have stuff on the shelf that's been there literally for 20 or 30 years. Typically, those stores are in older parts of town. It's fun to check them out and you occasionally find gems like the Michters. I encourage everyone to take up this pasttime.

- chuck

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Guest **DONOTDELETE**

Chuck, most excellent advice. I dropped into the oldest store in town and whadda know, I found two bottles of Old Crow bottled in bond (100 proof) in 1982, distilled in 1972. The distillary listed on the bottle is: A. W. Gaines. This stuff is much better than the Old Crow made today (cut down to 80 proof for a fair comarision). This citrisus taste is there, but it is darker and much more filled out. It is even in a 500 ml bottle, which you just do not see today. The words 'Old Crow' and an image of a crow are molded into the glass bottle, quite nice. The owner of the store said that there were foks that come all the way from Dallas, TX shopping for old whiskies.

I have a new pastime. Thanks Chuck.

Mark A. Mason, El Dorado, Arkansas

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