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Mint Julep

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HighTower

Yeah I was pretty impressed by the Mint Julep too Cam, I have been wanting to try one for ages.......I would also like to try and make them....for effect I need to find me one of those pewter cups :)

We may have to go back and watch Matt make one and get a feel for it.

Scott

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camduncan
We may have to go back and watch Matt make one and get a feel for it.

I'm all for spending a Saturday or Sunday afternoon there watching him make me mint juleps :D

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HighTower
I'm all for spending a Saturday or Sunday afternoon there watching him make me mint juleps :D

Sounds like a pretty good plan to me! I wonder what they charge for those suckers.......

Maybe we need to go there when the KY Derby is on!

Scott

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tmas

Well I have a whole bunch of mint growing in my yard for quite while. A few years ago when I found SB I started making juleps, what the heck, a new way to use up the (spear) mint growing in my yard. The wife and I absolutely love them!

Anyway, it's not difficult, at least the ones we make taste great to us!

So, here's a julep that sure tastes great, let me know if you agree:

Take a bunch of mint and strip the leaves off the branches. In a manhattan type glass you'd want to have the bottom just covered to about a quarter of an inch or so. Throw in a 1/2 to a full teaspoon of sugar, depending on how sweet you like things, add about a 1/2 a tablespoon of water and mash the sugar into the mint with the back of a teaspoon until the sugar is disolved and the mint is well bruised. Add a bunch of ice, a sprig of mint and your bourbon (I use about 3-3 1/2 oz) , stir and enjoy!

... We have ordered mint juleps in many establishments and never had a better one! Tom V

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ratcheer

Tom, that is exactly the way I like to make them. I , too, prefer granulated or superfine sugar over simple syrup.

Tim

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mrt

Yep, I prepared my first mint julep of this spring. I started by preparing the minted-syrup, again. Then I took my first sip of the julep tonight. It was delicious :yum: But I used relatively small ice cubes to fill the glass, not crushed ice. It worked though, together with a tablespoon of water, for a frosty glass. Spring's great time !

BTW, I used JBW for the mint julep, this time.

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Edward_call_me_Ed

I ordered a Mint Julep at my favorite bar the other day. It was okay. Halve the sugar and double the bourbon (Elijah Craig 12) and it would have been good.

Ed

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jeff

Leslie and I made mint juleps last night and we both agree: less sugar and more bourbon. Most recipes call for around a teaspoon I think. We used 1/2 teaspoon and it was fine. We also used ETL, which is one of the sweeter bourbons available, IMHO. I also like a lot more mint, and typically will use around 10 bruised leaves plus garnish. :yum:

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Ubertaster

I have been starting the evening with mint juleps and have been experimenting with the syrup. My latest mix is start with a pint jar and fill with half and half water and white Karo syrup. The water thins out the syrup so it will pour more easily. I put in 1/2 teaspoon of McCormick mint extract. Leave a little air at the top so you can mix it well. Now if I want a mint julep it is a simple task to put some crushed ice in my shaker and add 2oz of bourbon [i like WL Weller 12yo] and add 1 tablespoon of my syrup mix and shake. This is enough mix to last me all summer. Add a sprig of mint if you like for effect.

bj

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mrt

Last night I prepared a mint julep following the simpler way: I crushed five fresh mint leaves at he bottm of a glass with one tablespoon of sugar and a little water, then filled the glass with ice, added two oz. bourbon (Ten High) and a little more water. It was really delicious. I think this method gives more of that fresh feeling than the minted sugar syrup, besides it's easier to prepare.

It's very hot here. Fortunately, just one week later, I'll go on a seaside holiday for two hot august weeks :)

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jbarlycorn

I make these cause my wife likes em.

I grow 2 mints. Kentucky Colonel, a cross between apple and spearmint, said to be bred specificly for juleps, and the less traditional Robert Mitchum Peppermint which I like to add to the mix, crazy heretic that I am.

The thunder was his engine and the lightning was his load.

Robert

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Gillman

Inspired by Bettye Jo mentioning a brand of bourbon called Pendennis Club in the current vbt thread, I found online this early 1900's recipe for a mint julep associated with the famous Pendennis Club of Kentucky. The Club was known (in whiskey terms) for creating some famous whiskey cocktails.

It seems too it gave its name to a brand of bourbon. The recipe is notable for a number of reasons, including (what I have never heard before) that in a mint julep the mint should not be tasted but rather only smelled as the drink is consumed.

"MINT JULEP, PENDENNIS CLUB (1904)

The Blue Grass Cook Book

Compiled by Minnie C. Fox (1904)

PENDENNIS CLUB MINT JULEP

By a well-known member of the club, Louisville, Ky.

These are some essentials:

1st. Fine, straight, old Kentucky Bourbon whisky-blended whiskies do not give good results.

2d. An abundant supply of freshly cut sprigs of mint-preferably young shoots-no portion of which has been bruised.

3d. Dry, cracked flint ice. A glass will answer the purpose, but a silver mug is preferable. At this club, silver cups are kept on ice. A syrup of sugar and water is also kept on hand.

The silver cup is first filled with the ice, and then the desired quantity of fine whisky poured in and thoroughly shaken with a spoon or shaker until a heavy frost forms on the mug. The desired amount of syrup is then poured in and stirred enough to be mixed. The mint is then carefully placed in the mugs with the stems barely sticking in the ice and the tops projecting 2 inches above the top of the cup. Straws are then placed in the cup, reaching from the bottom to about 1 inch above the top, and the sooner one sticks one's nose in the mint and begins drinking through the straws the better. There is no flavor of mint, merely the odor.

Any stinting in quality or quantity materially affects the result.

The complete Blue Grass Cook Book may also be found on the Michigan State University website:

'Feeding America: The Historic American Cookbook Project'

http://digital.lib.msu.edu/projects/cookbooks/".

Gary

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craigthom
Any stinting in quality or quantity materially affects the result.

I think I will make this my motto.

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HighTower

Looks like I need to find some dry cracked flint ice, by the time I crush ice it starts to melt.

It would make thew world of difference to my favorite cocktail! I will have to try it without bruising mint in the bottom of the cup.

Scott

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